Faculty Appointments

Full-time Faculty

S. Harris Ali

Professor

BA Sociology, McMaster University (1987),
MA Sociology, McMaster University (1988),
B.Eng. Materials Engineering, McMaster University (1991),
Ph.D. Sociology, McMaster University (1996)

Twitter: @SHarrisAli
Website
Faculty Profile

Biography

After completing a post-doctorate at the University of Toronto, I began my tenure-track career at York University in 2000. My original appointment was in the Faculty of Environmental Studies where I have taught for 15 years before taking on the role of Graduate Program Director of Sociology and switching to the Sociology Department as a full-time faculty member thereafter. I am a long-standing member of the Graduate Program in Disaster and Emergency Management since its inception.

I am an environmental sociologist who specializes in environmental management, disaster research, urban research, and environmental health issues with an abiding interest in sociological theory and political sociology.

Research

My orientation to research is to build on a core foundation of sociological theory and methods to serve as a firm scaffolding to enable knowledge from other disciplines to be incorporated into a more holistic and comprehensive analysis of social and environmental phenomena. Much of my research is case study-based analyses of various socio-environmental phenomena: infectious disease outbreaks, toxic contamination events and disasters, mining disasters, climate change and environmental justice issues and the environmental movement in Canada.

Research areas

Technological and environmental disasters; infectious disease outbreaks, environmental management and climate change issues

Current Research Activities

I have more recently returned to studying the social and political dimensions of disease outbreaks. Over the years I have studied various different types of infectious disease outbreaks in various parts of the world, including the outbreak of waterborne E. Coli O157:H7 in the rural community of Walkerton, Ontario, the outbreak of Tuberculosis amongst the homeless in Toronto in the mid 2000s as well a comprehensive study of the outbreak of SARS in Toronto and other global cities such as Singapore and Hong Kong in 2003. This latter project resulted in an edited volume on SARS (Networked Disease: Emerging Infections in the Global City) which has recently been recognized by the Globe and Mail as one of the "top ten books that offer lessons from past pandemics." More recently with partners in Africa, I am the Principle Investigator of a study investigating community-based responses to Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreaks in West Africa and the recent outbreaks in the eastern portion of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This research has taken a new direction in investigating how the Ebola response has influenced the current COVID response in Africa. Currently, I am a co-principal investigator on a CIHR grant dealing with the role of social media misinformation/disinformation in flaming and countering anti-Asian racism during the present COVID response.

Selected Research Grants

2020–2022 COVID-19's Informational Virus: Analyzing the Viral Character and Effects of Social Media Misinformation (440307) (Nominated PI with Co PI – Dr. Fuyuki Kurasawa)

2018– 2020 International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Grant “The Role of Social, Cultural, and Environmental Factors in Improving Ebola Virus Disease Response and Resilience: Exploring the Potential of Community-Based Initiatives” (108967-001) $360,000 over two years (Nominated PI with Co_PI – Dr. Joseph MacCarthy and Dr. Mosoka Fallah)

2016–2021 NSERC Collaborative Research and Training Experience Program (CREATE) Grant: Advanced Disaster, Emergency and Rapid Response Simulation (Co-Investigator on team with Jimmy Huang PI) $1,650,000 over six years

2015–Current Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Grant: Advanced Disaster, Emergency and Rapid Response Simulation Facility (Co-Investigator on team with Professors Ali Asgary and Jianhong Wu PI) $1.45 million

2009 Understanding Pandemic Preparedness in the Context of the Homelessness Crisis. Funded by CIHR, P.I. Stephen A. Gaetz, Co-applicants – S. Harris Ali, John Graham, Roch Hurtubise, Stephen Hwang, Roger Keil, Janet Mosher, Bernadette Pauly, Schiff Waegemakers, Jianhong Wu ($100, 000)

Graduate Supervision

I am willing to accept graduate students in the areas of environmental sociology, disaster sociology and infectious diseases who have a strong conceptual and theoretical focus to their research.

Graduate Students Supervised

Masters Students
2018
Kathryn Wells
Activism in a Post-Disaster Setting: How displacement contributes to participation in Environmental Justice Movements (MA Sociology)

2015
Haroon Azam
Understanding Residents' Environmental Risk Perceptions in Three Toronto Neighbourhoods: Lived Experiences, Expectations and Policy Implications (Masters in Environmental Studies)

2013
Nicole M. Wilson
“Business Continuity and Critical Incidence Stress: Stress Effects on Ontario Provincial Court Staff” (Masters in Disasters and Emergency Management)

2012
Justine Walker
“Place and Infectious Disease: A Social Epidemiological Perspective
of TB and Homelessness” (Masters in Environmental Studies)

Nikolas Spohr
“Ontario's Green Energy Ideology in Context: How and why the
provincial government fails to 'think ecologically' ” (Masters in Environmental Studies)

2011
Josh Jayasundara
“Litigation Stress in the Aftermath of a Canadian Technological Disaster” (Masters in Environmental Studies)

2010
Marc Settoni
“Netlogo Tuberculosis Model of Disease Transmission in Toronto urban homeless communities” (Masters in Environmental Studies)

2009
Ilda Cordeiro
“Brownfield Redevelopment and Legislation in Canada: Using a Public Health Perspective” (Masters in Environmental Studies)

2008
Tanya Gulliver
"Toronto West End Heat Registry and Heat Response Project”
(Masters in Environmental Studies)

PhD Students
2014–2020
Susan Agada (Faculty of Environmental Studies)
The 2012 Flooding in Nigeria: A Profile of Institutional Neglect (Defended 18 September 2020)

Currently
Natali Downer (Faculty of Environmental Studies)
Digital Prosumption and Ultra-Fast Fashion in the Attention Economy

Ann Wordsworth (Faculty of Environmental Studies)
Sacrifice or Salvation: Can Animal Lives be Spared and Human Health Improved by Toxics Reform?

Chris Walsh (Sociology)
The ineffectiveness of poverty reduction programs due to policy actor incoordination

Lisa Seiler (Sociology)
Derailing the Climate Change Agenda? Public Transit Post-COVID

Courses Taught

2020 DEMS 5020 3.0 Disasters: Concepts and Causes (W)
2019 DEMS 5020 3.0 Disasters: Concepts and Causes (F)
2017–18 Graduate Program in Sociology Weekly Workshop Series (F and W)
2017 SOCI 6200 Contemporary Topics in Social Theory: Exploring the Dark Side of Late Modernity (Summer)
2016–17 Graduate Program in Sociology Weekly Workshop Series (F and W)
2016 DEMS 5030 Social and Behavioural Dimensions of Disasters (Winter)
2015–16 Graduate Program in Sociology Weekly Workshop Series (F and W)
2014 ENVS 6136 Environment and Health (F)
2013 ENVS 6136 Environment and Health (F)
SOCI 5901 Key Debates in Sociological Theory (F)
2012 ENVS 6103 3.0 Perspectives in Environmental Sociology
2012 DEMS 5020 Disasters: Concepts & Causes (2 Sections)
2012 ENVS 6135 3.0 Environment, Society and Disease
2011 ENVS 6103 3.0 Perspectives in Environmental Sociology
2010 ENVS 6135 3.0 Environment, Society and Disease

Books

2017 Mulvihill, Peter and S. Harris Ali Environmental Management: Critical Thinking and Emerging Practices. London: Routledge.

2008 Ali, S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil (Eds) Networked Disease: Emerging Infections in the Global City. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Select Refereed Journal Articles

2020
Connolly, Creighton; Ali, S. Harris and Roger Keil “On the relationships between COVID-19 and extended urbanization” Dialogues in Human Geography 10(2) 213–216

Connolly, C.; Keil, R., and S. Harris Ali “Extended urbanisation and the spatialities of infectious disease: Demographic change, infrastructure and governance” Urban Studies 1-19 DOI: 10.1177/0042098020910873

2019
Ali, S. Harris “Theory and the Value of the Disciplined Sociologist” Canadian Review of Sociology 56(1): 134-137.

2011
Ali, S. Harris “Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome” in Green Health: An A-to-Z Guide Edited by Oladele Ogunseitan. Sage Publications

2010
Brisbois, Ben W. and S. Harris Ali “Climate Change, Vector-borne Disease and Interdisciplinary Research: Social Science Perspectives on an Environment and Health Controversy” EcoHealth 7:425-438.

Ali, S, Harris “Tuberculosis, Homelessness and the Politics of Mobility” Canadian Journal of Urban Research 19(2):80-107.

2009
Hooker, Claire and S. Harris Ali “SARS and Security: Health in the New Normal” Studies in Political Economy 84:101-128.

2008
Ali, S. Harris “Stigmatized Ethnicity, Public Health and Globalization” Canadian Ethnic Studies 40(3): 43-64.

2007
Keil, Roger and S. Harris Ali “Governing the Sick City: Urban Governance in the Age of Emerging Infectious Disease” Antipode 40(1):846-871.

Ali, S. Harris and Roger Keil “Contagious Cities” Geography Compass 1(5):1207-1226

Mulvihill, Peter and S. Harris Ali “Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic” Environmental Impact Assessment Review 27:343-358.

2006
Keil, Roger and Harris Ali. “Multiculturalism, Racism and Infectious Disease in the Global City” Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies. 16:23-49.

Ali, S. Harris; Roger Keil, Claire Major and Estair van Wagner “Pandemics, place and planing: Learning from SARS”. Plan Canada. 46(3):34-36.

Salehi, Roxana and S. Harris Ali “The Social and Political Context of Disease Outbreaks: The case of SARS in Toronto” Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de Politiques 32(4):373-385.

Keil, Roger and S. Harris Ali “The Avian Flu: The Lessons Learned from the 2003 SARS Outbreak in Toronto” Area 38(1): 107-109.

Ali, S. Harris and Roger Keil. “Global cities and the spread of infectious disease: The Case of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Toronto, Canada.” Urban Studies 43(3):1-19.

2004
Sanford, Sarah and S. Harris Ali. “The New Public Health Hegemony: Response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Toronto.” Social Theory and Health 3: 105–125.

Ali, S. Harris. “A Socio-Ecological Autopsy of the E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak in Walkerton, Ontario, Canada.” Social Science and Medicine 58(12): 2601-2612

2003
Ali, S. Harris. “Disaster and the Political Economy of Recycling: Toxic Fire in an Industrial City.” Social Problems. 49(2):129-149.

Ali, S. Harris. “Dealing With Toxicity in the Risk Society: The Case of the Hamilton, Ontario Plastics Recycling Fire.” The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology. 39(1):29-48.

[2007] Reproduced in Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives. Edited by Lorne Tepperman and Harley Dickinson. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

1998
Ali, S. Harris. “The Search for a Landfill Site in The Risk Society.” The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 36 (1):1-19

1997
Ali, S. Harris. “Trust, Risk, and the Public: The Case of the Guelph Landfill Search.” Canadian Journal of Sociology, 22 (4): 481-504

Chapters in Books

2018
S. Harris Ali “Borderless Disease” [Revised] In George Ritzer (Ed) The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

2016
Harris Ali, Patricia Perkins, Roger Keil, Barlu Dumbuya, Michaela Hynie and Pablo Idahosa “The Social and Political Dimensions of the Ebola Response: Global Inequality, Climate Change, and Infectious Disease” In W. Leal Filho, UM Azeiteiro and F. Alves (Eds) Climate Change and Health: Improving Resilience and Reducing Risks. Springer (pages 151- 169).

2015
S. Harris Ali “Sociology and the Environment” in Robert J. Brym (Ed) New Society, 8th Edition. Toronto: Nelson. Revised and Updated. (pages 402-421)

2014
“Tar Sands Oil Development and the Criminalization of Environmental Groups in Canada” In Fatma Arslan (Ed) Sociology and Critical Perspectives on Social Movements. DAKAM (Eastern Mediterranean Academic Research Center: Istanbul. Pages 89-99).

2012
S. Harris Ali “Infectious Diseases as New Risks for Human Health” In Sigrun Kabisch, Anna Kunath, Petra-Schweizer-Ries, Annette Steinfuhrer (Eds.) Advances in People-Environment Studies, Volume 3: Vulnerability, Risks, and Complexity: Impacts of Global Change on Human Habitats. Gottingen:Hogrefe. Pp.13-25.

S. Harris Ali “Infectious Disease, Environmental Change and Social Control” (abridged version) Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives, 2nd Edition. Edited by Lorne Tepperman and Angela Kalyta. Toronto: Oxford University Press. Pages 295-298.

2011
Roger Keil and S. Harris Ali “The urban political pathology of emerging infectious disease in the age of the global city” In Eugene McCann and Kevin Ward (Eds) Assembling Urbanism: Mobilizing Knowledge and Shaping Cities in the Global Context. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Pages: 123-145.

Harris Ali and Roger Keil “Global Cities and Infectious Disease” In Ben Derudde, Michael Hoyler, Peter, J. Taylor, Frank Witlok (Eds) International Handbook of Globalization Camberley Surrey:Edward Elgar. Pages 593-611.

S. Harris Ali (2011) “Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)” Green Series, Volume 9: Health Edited by Oladele Ogunseitan. Sage.

S. Harris Ali (2011) “Tuberculosis” Green Series, Volume 9: Health Edited by Oladele Ogunseitan. Sage

2010
S. Harris Ali “The Microbial Traffic of New and Emerging Infectious Disease Threats: The case of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Influenza A/H1N1 (Swine Flu)” In Susan Craddock, Tamara Giles-Vernick, and Jennifer Gunn (Eds) Influenza and Public Health: Learning From Past Pandemics. London: Earthscan Press. Pages 22-37.

S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil “Securitizing Network Flows: Infectious Disease and Airports”. In S. Graham and S. Marvin (Eds) Disrupted Cities: When Infrastructure Fails. NY: Routledge. Pages 97-110.

2009
S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil “Public Health and the Political Economy of Scale: Implications for Understanding the Response to the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Outbreak in Toronto” In Roger Keil and Rianne Mahon (Eds) Leviathan Undone? Towards a Political Economy of Scale. Vancouver: UBC Press. Pages 195-208.

S. Harris Ali “The Political Economy of Environmental Inequality: The social distribution of risk as an environmental injustice” In Julian Agyeman, Peter Cole, Patricia O’Riley, Randolph Haluza-DeLay (Eds) Speaking for Ourselves: Environmental Justice in Canada Vancouver: The University of British Columbia Press. Pages 97-110.

2008
S. Harris Ali “Analyzing Environmental Disasters” In Samir Das Gupta (Ed) Understanding the Global Environment. New Delhi: Pearson Press. Pages: 245-264.

S. Harris Ali “Environmental Health and Society” In B. Singh Bolaria and Harley D. Dickinson (Eds) Health, Illness, and Health Care in Canada 4th Edition. Toronto: Nelson. Pages 370-387.

S. Harris Ali and Ann Novogradec "Disasters and Emergency Preparedness" in J. Golson and Yawei Zhang (Eds) Encyclopedia of Global Health. London: Sage. Pages 532-535.

S. Harris Ali “Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)” in J. Golson and Yawei Zhang (Eds) Encyclopedia of Global Health. London: Sage. Pages 1532-1533.

Roger Keil and S. Harris Ali “SARS and the Restructuring of Health Governance in Toronto” in S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil (Eds) Networked Disease: Emerging Infections in the Global City. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Pages 55-69.

Roger Keil and S. Harris Ali “Racism is a Weapon of Mass Destruction: SARS and the Social Fabric of Urban Multiculturalism” in S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil (Eds) Networked Disease: Emerging Infections in the Global City. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Pages 152-166.

S. Harris Ali “SARS as an Emergent Complex: Toward a Networked Approach to Urban Infectious Disease” in S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil (Eds) Networked Disease: Emerging Infections in the Global City. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Pages 235-249.

Other Publications

S. Harris Ali and Fuyuki Kurasawa (2020) “#COVID19: Social media both a blessing and a curse during coronavirus pandemic” https://theconversation.com/covid19-social-media-both-a-blessing-and-a-curse-during-coronavirus-pandemic-133596

Roger Keil, Creighton Connolly and S. Harris Ali (2020) “Outbreaks like coronavirus start in and spread from the edges of cities” The Conversation—https://theconversation.com/outbreaks-like-coronavirus-start-in-and-spread-from-the-edges-of-cities-130666

Media Engagements

2020
Television Interview with Katherine Ward, Global News at Six, on social aspects of pandemic (aired 27 September 2020)

Radio interview with Jonathan Green on ABC Radio National in Australia program Blueprint “The politics of mask culture” (2020) for Podcast on 22 August 2020
https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/the-politics-of-face-masks/12575196

Phone Interview with Melissa Couto The Canadian Press (6 July 2020) https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/face-masks-condom-safety_ca_5f04e1d2c5b67a80bbffbe6c

Interview with Sandra Ong BBC (May 5)” PSYCHOLOGY: How face masks affect our communication” https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200609-how-face-masks-affect-our-communication (appearing 8 June 2020)

Oped “What if physical distancing is not effective in COVID-19 containment? Learning from the community-centred response to Ebola in West Africa” National Newswatch https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2020/04/20/what-if-physical-distancing-is-not-effective-in-covid-19-containment/#.Xp31NchKiUk

COVID-19 Panel Discussion Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 Scholars Hub Online An Urban Pandemic? COVID-19 in a world of cities for York University Alumni Enagagement

Interview with Graham Slaughter CTV News, April 3, 2020
https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/18-isolated-countries-have-avoided-covid-19-could-they-skip-the-pandemic-1.4882162?cache=wcoseppn%3FautoPlay%3Dtrue%3FclipId%3D89680

Phone Interview with Talya Meyers. Humanitarian and Health Journalist https://www.directrelief.org/2020/04/the-world-is-rapidly-urbanizing-that-may-mean-more-epidemics/ March 30, 2020

Radio interview with Jonathan Green on ABC Radio National in Australia program Blueprint “The urban politics of COVID-19” (March 25, 2020) for Podcast
https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/urban-politics-of-covid-19/12095834

Phone Interview with Melissa Couto The Canadian Press (23 March 2020)
https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/03/25/is-online-shaming-of-covid-19-rebels-effective-maybe-but-not-for-everyone/
https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/the-latest-developments-on-covid-19-in-canada-569085002.html

Urban Political Podcast "The Urbanization of COVID-19" 14. March 2020 with Roger Keil and Creighton Connolly https://urbanpolitical.podigee.io/16-covid19

Interview with Jason Miller, The Toronto Star https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/03/23/canadian-government-doubles-down-on-money-for-covid-19-counter-attack.html

Kevin McGran Toronto Star https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/03/24/like-waking-up-in-a-zombie-flick-returning-vacationers-must-adapt-to-very-different-canada-amid-covid-19.html

Interview with Sarah Zheng of South China Morning Post (9 March 2020) https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3075211/face-masks-and-coronavirus-how-culture-affects-your-decision (posted on 14 March)
https://www.msn.com/en-xl/asia/top-stories/face-masks-and-coronavirus-how-culture-affects-your-decision-to-wear-one/ar-BB11cAvG 14/03/2020

Interview with Jessica Rachel Buxbaum of Supermaker (6 March 2020)
https://supermaker.com/articles/as-coronavirus-spreads-so-does-xenophobia-and-its-impacting-asian-owned-businesses (posted 14 March)

Interview with James Murray, Senior Report, CBC for The National on Coronavirus and Racism (aired on radio 28 January)

Interview with Alan Neal of the radio show CBC All In A Day (aired on radio 28 January 2020) “Discriminatory Response to Coronavirus” Available as podcast: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-92-all-in-a-day/clip/15757914-discriminatory-responses-to-the-coronavirus

Interview with Elian Yahye of NRC Handelsbad (newspaper of record in the Netherlands); published as Feature Interview :‘Een epidemie versterkt racisme’ https://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2020/02/10/een-epidemie-versterkt-racisme-a3989897

Phone interview with Jillian Kestler-D’Amours of Al Jazeera; Online on Coronavirus and Racism (31 January) https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/02/chinese-canadians-denounce-rising-xenophobia-tied-coronavirus-200202191216923.html

Phone interview with Marisa Peryer of Undark Magazine (30 January) https://undark.org/2020/02/13/coronavirus-racism-history/

Phone interview with Daskhana Bacaramurty of the Globe and Mail on Coronavirus and Racism (27 January) https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-panic-over-coronavirus-prompts-school-board-in-ontario-to-warn-parents/

Phone interview with Premila D’Sa of the Huffington Post Canada on Coronavirus and Racism (28 January—https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/coronavirus-sars-racism-canada_ca_5e3241f6c5b611ac94cf4b36)

2019
Interview with Katie Nicholson, CBC The National on Ebola Research (aired on radio and television 25 August 2019)
(https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/ebola-research-vaccine-public-health-1.5249602)

2017
Phone interview with Adam Rogers, Wired Magazine (on Hepatitis A outbreaks in California)(16 Nov) (https://www.wired.com/story/californias-hepatitis-a-outbreak-is-the-future-poking-us-in-the-face/)

Email Interview with Abdeali Saherwala of Excaliber (York University newspaper) on Environmental Management book

Email Interview with Yfile on Environmental Management book
(http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2017/11/02/bold-new-book-aims-to-reframe-environmental-thinking-at-pivotal-point-in-time/)

2015
Phone Interview with Oyeyinka Oyelowo of Osgoode Hall Law School Newspaper Obiter Dicta (on climate debt) (http://obiter-dicta.ca/2015/10/13/enforcing-international-climate-debt/)

2014
Phone Interview with Emily Troutman, freelance journalist (on stigmatization and disease) (August 11)
(http://aid.works/2014/11/race-and-disease-should-we-change-the-name-of-ebola/)

2013
Phone Interview with Jon Hembrey, Senior writer, CBCNews on the 10th Anniversary of SARS (March 6)

2010
Television Interview with Aadel Haleem Reporter, South Asian Edition, OMNI Toronto on “The Impacts of Natural Disasters” (Broadcast Dec 20)


Karen Anderson

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile

I’m a sociologist who takes seriously C Wright Mill’s statement on the Sociological Imagination.

I’m a sociologist who has written two introductory sociology texts, largely as an exercise to gain a better understanding of the discipline.

I’m a sociologist who doesn’t pay much attention to contemporary disciplinary boundaries—for example, I’ve interests in physics, human embodiment and neurobiology.

Research areas

Past research interests included neurosociology, theory, embodiment, refugees, digital communications

Current Research Activities

Currently I’m developing a research and writing project comparing successful and unsuccessful cases of environmental activism in the South Shore area of NS

My approach to graduate supervision is co-operative—I like to learn/discover along with the student. I’m most effective when engaged with a student who is a clear thinker who is passionate about an interesting project.

Graduate Students Supervised

I’ve supervised many MA and PhD candidates, several of whom have gone on to become professors at York or at other institutions in Canada, the US and Europe.

Among those currently teaching at York for whom I’ve served as either primary supervisor or committee member are:

Annette Bickford—Social Science
Eric Mykhalovskiy—Sociology
Cate Sandilands—Environmental Studies
Nergis Canefe—Politics

Books

Chain Her By One Foot. Routledge
Thinking About Sociology. Oxford University Press

Refereed Journal Articles

Kyriakides, C, McLuhan, A., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L. (2018) Status Eligibilities: The Eligibility to Exist and Authority to Act in Refugee–Host Relations, Social Forces. DOI doi.org/10.1093/sf/soy109

Kyriakides, C., Bajjali, L., McLuhan, A., Anderson, K. (2018) Beyond Refuge: Contested Orientalism and Persons of Self-Rescue. Canadian Ethnic Studies (special issue). Volume 50 Number 2, 59–78

Kyriakides, C., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L., McLuhan, A. (Forthcoming, 2019) 'Splits in the Neighbourhood?: Negotiating Visibility in a Rural Reception Context'. In L. Hamilton, L. Veronis, M. Walton-Roberts (Eds) A National Project: Canada’s Syrian Refugee Resettlement Experience. McGill-Queens Press.

Kyriakides, C., McLuhan, A., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L. (2019). Status Eligibilities: The Eligibility to Exist and Authority to Act in Refugee-Host Relations. Social Forces. 98(1): 279–302.

Kyriakides, C., McLuhan, A., Bajjali, L., Anderson, K., Elgendy, N., (2019). (Mis)Trusted Contact: Resettlement Knowledge Assets and the Third Space of Refugee Reception. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees. September 2019. *special issue on private sponsorship.

Kyriakides, C., Bajjali, L., McLuhan A., Anderson, K. (2018) Beyond Refuge: Contested Orientalism and Persons of Self-Rescue. Canadian Ethnic Studies. *Special Issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association.

Chapters in Books

Kyriakides, C., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L., McLuhan, A. (Forthcoming, 2020) 'Splits in the Neighbourhood?: Negotiating Visibility in a Rural Reception Context'. In L. Hamilton, L. Veronis, M Walton-Roberts (Eds) A National Project: Canada’s Syrian Refugee Resettlement Experience. Montreal: McGill-Queens Press.

Kyriakides, C., McLuhan, A., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L. (2020) 'Transactions of Worth in Refugee-Host Relations’. In S. Labman and G. Cameron (Eds) Private Refugee Sponsorship: Concepts, Cases and Consequences. Montreal: McGill-Queens Press.

Kyriakides, C., McLuhan, A., Anderson, K., Bajjali, L., Elgendy, N., (2020). 'Building Trust in the Third Space of Refugee Reception'. In T. Fouskas (Ed) Immigrants and Refugees in Times of Crisis. European Public Law Series. Athens: European Public Law Organisation.


Pat Armstrong

Research Professor of Sociology, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada

B.A., Sociology, University of Toronto, M.A., Canadian Studies, Carleton University, Ph.D., Sociology, Carleton University

Faculty Profile

As an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, I came to sociology because it allowed me to learn from a wide range of disciplines and scholars. I also became an activist around new social justice issues for me, working with others to make change in and outside the university. It was there, too, and in the three years I spent after graduation employed by student unions, that I became increasingly convinced that feminist political economy was the most useful theoretical. approach, albeit one in constant need of revision. All this continues to guide my work. Most of my research is done in teams that always include students because I am convinced that we do our best work together. Most of it is also done in partnership with unions and with community organizations. All of it is focused on providing evidence to inform change, which is one reason I have focused primarily on Canada, but a Canada located in a global world. My thesis for my MA in Canadian Studies became The Double Ghetto: Canadian Women and their Segregated Work. Our hospital research was prompted by our daughter breaking her leg. As we spent hours in the hospital, we realized how this place encompassed the full range of women’s paid and unpaid work, with structures shaping inequities among women. But we also realized that we needed to know much more about health care, as we moved in our research from hospitals to home care and, most recently, to long-term residential care. Along the way, I continue to work on pay and employment equity as well as on women’s health. And because I focus on making change with others, I try very hard to make my writing as accessible as possible while constructing ways to help ensure that the research reflects the experiences and voices of those who do the work under study.

Research areas

Health care, women’s health, pay equity, work, social policy, research methods, states

Current Research Activities

Our international, interdisciplinary team ahs just completed a ten-years study that still provides the basis for publications, even though we have produced a hundred of them. We are continuing a project on the transition into long-term care and the unpaid work done in care homes and on another project focusing in families and long-term care in the time of COVID-19.

Selected Research Grants

Covid-19, familes and long-term residential care” SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant, 2021. $24,850, Pat Armstrong PI

Changing Places: Paid and Unpaid Work in Public Places. SSHRC Insight Grant, 2018-2021, $197,039, Pat Armstrong PI

Graduate Students Supervised

I have supervised to completion 15 post-doctoral fellows, 21 PhDs and 47 MAs. In addition, I have served on 26 committtees for PhDs and for 11 M’s completed and continue to serve on a number of others; in other words, too many to list. They have covered topics such as health policy, health care, feminist theory, women’s health, states, pay equity, women’s work.

Courses Taught

Courses Taught at Carleton University
Women's Studies, Interdisciplinary Seminar
Canadian Women and Work
Health Care in Canada
Modern Concepts of Canada
Introduction to Canadian Studies
Political Economy of Health

Courses Taught at York University
Work and Occupations 2013
Health, Policy and Care, 2004-2007
Courses Women and Health, 2007-2008
M.A. Workshop, 2007-2008
Women and Society, 1999-2000
Social Order and Social Organization, 1999-2000
Women and Work, 1991
Sociology of Health and Illness, 1987-1991
Theorizing Women's Work, 1987-1989

Courses Taught at Other Institutions
Introduction to Sociology
Canadian Society
Sociology of the Family
Alternatives for Women
Quebec Society
Political Economy of Health

Books

Books: authored and co-authored

Wash Wear and Care: Clothing and Laundry in Long-Term Residential Care (Pat Armstrong and Suzanne Day), Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017, 206 pp.

About Canada: Health Care (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, Revised Second Edition, 2016, 181 pp. About Canada: Health Care (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 2008, 157 pp

Wasting Away: The Undermining of Canadian Health Care (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Wynford Project Edition, with new Introduction, Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010, xii + 271 pp. Wasting Away: The Undermining of Canadian Health Care (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Revised Second Edition, Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002, viii + 272 pp. Wasting Away: The Undermining of Canadian Health Care (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996, viii + 245 pp.

The Double Ghetto: Canadian Women and Their Segregated Work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Wynford Project Edition, with new Preface, Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010, 7 + 259 pp. The Double Ghetto: Canadian Women and Their Segregated Work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Revised Third Edition, Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1994, 259 pp. The Double Ghetto: Canadian Women and Their Segregated Work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Revised Second Edition, Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1984, 223 pp. The Double Ghetto: Canadian Women and Their Segregated Work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978, 199 pp.

They Deserve Better: The long-term care experience in Canada and Scandinavia (Pat Armstrong, Albert Banerjee, Marta Szebehely, Hugh Armstrong, Tamara Daly and Stirling Lafrance), Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2009, 155 pp.

Critical to Care; The Invisible Women in Health Services (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and Krista Scott-Dixon), Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008, xii + 228 pp.

“Heal Thyself”: Managing Health Care Reform (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Ivy Bourgeault, Jacqueline Choiniere, Eric Mykhalovskiy and Jerry White), Toronto: Garamond Press, 2000, 171 pp.

Universal Health Care. What the United States Can Learn From the Canadian Experience (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and Claudia Fegan), New York: The New Press, 1998, xv + 176 pp.

Medical Alert: New Work Organizations in Health Care (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Jacqueline Choiniere, Eric Mykhalovskiy and Jerry White), Toronto: Garamond Press, 1997, x + 158 pp.

Take Care: Warning Signals for Canadian Health Care (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Jacqueline Choiniere, Gina Feldberg and Jerry White), Toronto: Garamond Press, 1994, 127 pp.

Vital Signs: Nursing Work in Transition (Pat Armstrong, Jacqueline Choiniere and Elaine Day), Toronto: Garamond Press, 1993, 125 pp.

Theorizing Women's Work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Toronto: Garamond Press, 1990, 161 pp.

Labour Pains: Women's Work in Crisis (Pat Armstrong), Toronto: The Women's Press, 1984, 273 pp.

A Working Majority: What Women Must Do for Pay (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Ottawa: Supply and Services Canada for the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women, 1983, 280 pp. Translated as Une Majorité Laborieuse: Les femmes qui gagnent leur vie, mais a quel prix, Ottawa: Approvisionnements et Services Canada pour le Conseil Consultatif Canadien de la Situation de la Femme, 1983, 329 pp.

Books: edited/co-edited
Health Matters: Evidence, Critical Social Science and Health Care Canada (Eric Mykhalovskiy, Jacqueline Choiniere, Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, eds.) Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020.

The Privatization of Care: The Case Of Nursing Homes (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong, eds.) New York: Routledge (2020)

Creative Teamwork: Developing Rapid, Site-Switching Ethnography (Pat Armstrong and Ruth Lowndes, eds.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.

Women’s Health: Intersections of Policy, Research and Practice – 2nd edition (Pat Armstrong and Ann Pederson, eds.), Toronto: Women’s Press, 2015, 380 pp.

Shaping Academia for the Public Good (Louise Potvin and Pat Armstrong, eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2013, 297 pp.

Troubling Care: Critical Perspectives on Research and Practices (Pat Armstrong and Susan Braedley, eds.), Toronto: Women’s Press, 2013, 253 pp.

Thinking Women and Health Care Reform in Canada (Pat Armstrong, Barbara Clow, Karen Grant, Margaret Haworth-Brockman, Beth Jackson, Ann Pederson and Morgan Seeley, eds.), Toronto: Women’s Press, 2012, vi + 333 pp.

A Place to Call Home: Long Term Care in Canada (Pat Armstrong, Madeline Boscoe, Barbara Clow, Karen Grant, Margaret Haworth-Brockman, Beth Jackson, Ann Pederson, Morgan Seeley, Jane Springer, eds.), Toronto: Fernwood Publishing, 2009, 127 pp.

Women’s Health: Intersections of Policy, Research and Practice (Pat Armstrong and Jennifer Deadman eds.), Toronto: Women’s Press, 2008, xi + 290 pp.

Caring For/Caring About. Women, Home Care and Unpaid Caregiving (Karen R. Grant, Carol Amaratunga, Pat Armstrong, Madeline Boscoe, Ann Pederson and Kay Willson eds.), Aurora: Garamond Press, 2004, 200 pp.

Studies in Political Economy: Developments in Feminism (Caroline Andrew, Hugh Armstrong, Pat Armstrong, Wallace Clement and Leah Vosko, eds.), Toronto: Canadian Scholar’s Press, 2003, vi + 362 pp.

Exposing Privatization: Women and Health Care Reform (Pat Armstrong, Carol Amaratunga, Jocelyne Bernier, Karen Grant, Ann Pederson and Kay Willson, eds.), Aurora: Garamond Press, 2002, 308 pp.

Unhealthy Times: Political Economy Perspectives on Health and Care in Canada (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and David Coburn eds.), Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2001, x + 254 pp.

World Class Cities: Can Canada Play? (Caroline Andrew, Pat Armstrong, and André Lapierre eds.), Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1999, 454 pp.

Feminism, Political Economy and the State: Contested Terrain (Pat Armstrong and M. Patricia Connelly eds.), Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press, 1999, 373 pp.

Feminism in Action: Studies in Political Economy (Pat Armstrong, M. Patricia Connelly eds.), Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press, 1992, 342 pp.

Refereed Journal Articles

“Care Summit Keynote” International Journal of Care and Caring forthcoming spring 2021

Michael Liu, Colleen J. Maxwell, Pat Armstrong, Michael Schwandt, Andrea Moser,,Margaret J. McGregor, Susan E. Bronskill, Irfan A. Dhalla COVID-19 in Long-Term Care Homes in Ontario and British Columbia Canadian Medical Association Journal September 30:192, (2020)

Clothing matters: locating wash, wear, and care, Pat Armstrong & Suzanne Day Studies in Political Economy, 101:1, 1-16, 2020 DOI: 10.1080/07078552.2020.1738777

Non‐job work/unpaid caring: Gendered industrial relations in long‐term care. Donna Baines, D., & Pat Armstrong, Gender, Work, & Organization, 26(7), pp 934-947, 2019. DOI: 10.1111/gwao.12293.

Balancing the Tension in Long-Term Residential Care Ageing International, Online Published online before print, May 24, 2017; DOI: 10.1007/s12126-017-9285-7. In print 43(1):74-90.

“Liminal and invisible long-term care labour: Precarity in the face of austerity” (Tamara Daly and Pat Armstrong), The Journal of Industrial Relations, Online April 19, 2016.

“‘Care workers Don’t Have a Voice:’ Epistemological Violence in Residential Care for Older People” (Albert Bannerjee, Pat Armstrong, Tamara Daly, Hugh Armstrong, Susan Braedley), Journal of Aging Studies, 33: 28-36, April 2015.

“Centring Care: Explaining Regulatory Tensions in Residential Care for Older Persons” (Albert Banerjee and Pat Armstrong), Studies in Political Economy, 95, Spring 2015: 7-28.

“The Meaning of "Dining" The Social Organization of Food in LTC” (Ruth Lowndes, Pat Armstrong and Tamara Daly), Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 4(1): 19–34, 2015.

“Taking Gender into Account in Occupational Health Research: Continuing Tensions” (Pat Armstrong and Karen Messing), Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 12(1): 3–16, 2014.

“Puzzling Skills” Canadian Review of Sociology, Special Issue 50th Anniversary of the Canadian Review of Sociology, 53(3): 256–283, 2013.

“Structural violence in long-term, residential care for older people: Comparing Canada and Scandinavia” (Albert Banerjee, Tamara Daly, Pat Armstrong, Marta Szebehely, Hugh Armstrong, Stirling LaFrance), Social Science and Medicine, 74(3): 390-398, 2012.

“Structural Violence in Long-Term Residential Care” (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Albert Banerjee, Tamara Daly, and Marta Szebehely), Women's Health and Urban Life, 10(1): 11-129, May 2011.

“Qualitative research and the politics of knowledge in an age of evidence: Developing a research-based practice of immanent critique” (Eric Mykhalovskiy, Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Ivy Bourgeault, Jackie Choiniere, Joel Lexchin, Suzanne Peters and Jerry White), Social Science and Medicine, 67: 195-203, 2008.

“Bringing it Home: Women’s Health Work” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Women's Health and Urban Life: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal, VII:2: 6-15, December 2008.

“Indicating Occupational Health” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 6(2): 3-7, 2008.

“Back to Basics: Pay Equity for Women Today” Labour and Industry, 18(2): 11-32, December 2007).

“Public and Private: Implications for Care Work” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Sociological Review, 53(2): 167-187, 2005. Reprinted in Lynne Pettinger, Jane Parry, Rebecca Taylor and Miriam Glucksman, eds., A New Sociology of Work. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006.

“Market Principles, Business Practices and Health Care: Comparing the U.S. and Canadian Experiences” (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, Jacqueline Choiniere, Joel Lexchin, Eric Mykhalovskiy, Suzanne Peters and Jerry P. White), International Journal of Canadian Studies, 28: 13-38, Fall 2003, issue on “Health and Well-being in Canada.”

“Thinking it Through. Women, Work and Caring in the New Millennium” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Canadian Woman Studies/les cahiers de la femme, 21/22:4/1: 44-50, Spring/Summer 2002. Summary version of the original. Reprinted as pp. 145-53 in Barbara A. Crow and Lise Gotell, eds., Open Boundaries: A Canadian Women’s Studies Reader. Toronto: Prentice-Hall, 2004.

“Decentralized Health Care in Canada” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), British Medical Journal, 318: 1201-04, May 1999.

“Restructuring Pay Equity for a Restructured Work Force: Canadian Perspectives” (Pat Armstrong and Mary Cornish), Gender, Work and Organization, 4(2): 67-86, April 1997.

“Caring and Women's Work” Health and Canadian Society, 2(1): 109-18, 1996.

“Lessons from Pay Equity” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Studies in Political Economy, 32: 29-54, Spring 1990. Reprinted as pp. 286-314 in M. Patricia Connelly and Pat Armstrong, eds., Feminism in Action. Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press, 1992.

“Sex and the Professions in Canada” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Journal of Canadian Studies, 27(1): 118-35, 1989.

“Beyond Numbers: Problems with Quantitative Data” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Alternate Routes, 6: 1-40, 1983. Reprinted as pp. 307-335 in Mary Kinnear and Greg Mason, eds., Women and Work. Winnipeg: University of Winnipeg Institute for Social and Economic Research, 1983. Revised version published as pp.54-79 in Greta Hofmann Nemiroff, ed., Women and Men: Interdisciplinary Readings on Gender. Toronto: Fitzhenry and Whiteside, 1987.

“Beyond Sexless Class and Classless Sex: Towards Feminist Marxism” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Studies in Political Economy, 10: 7-43, Winter 1983. Excerpt reprinted as pp. 317-19 in Althea Pierce and Susan Silva-Wayne, eds., Feminisms and Womanisms: A Women’s Studies Reader. Toronto: Women’s Press, 2004. Reprinted as pp. 11-50 in Caroline Andrew et al., eds., Studies in Political Economy: Development in Feminism. Toronto: Women’s Press, 2003. Reprinted as pp. 1-37 in Pat Armstrong et al., Feminist Marxism or Marxist Feminism: A Debate. Toronto: Garamond, 1985. Revised version published as pp. 208-237 in Michele Barrett and Roberta Hamilton, eds., The Politics of Diversity. London: Verso and Montreal: Book Centre, 1987.

“The Segregated Participation of Women in the Canadian Labour Force, 1941-1971” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 12.4(1): 370-384, November 1975.

Selected Chapters in Books

“Putting Life into Years: Promoting Health and Joy in Nursing Homes” Armstrong, Pat, Hugh Armstrong and Jacqueline Choiniere in Irv Rootman et al eds. Health promotion and Older Adults in Canada Toronto: CSP, forthcoming fall 2020

“Learning Sociology: A Participant’s Perspective” in Stephen Harold Riggins and Neil McLaughlin eds. Canadian Sociologists in the First Person Kingston McGill-Queens University Press, forthcoming fall 2020

Start Early. Stay Late. Planning for Care in Old Age (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong) in Leo Panitch and Greg Albo eds. Beyond Digital Capitalism: New Ways of Living London: Merlin Press 2020

Privatization, Hybridization and Resistance in Contemporary Care Work”
(Pat Armstrong and Donna Baines) in Donna Baines and Ian Cunningham, eds. Working in the Context of Austerity Bristol: Policy Press 2020

“Privatization and COVID-19: A Deadly Combination for Nursing Homes” Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and Ivy Bourgeault pp.447-463 in Colleen M Flood, Vanessa MacDonnell, Jane Philpott, Sophie Theriault & Sridhar Venkatapuram, eds, Vulnerable: The Policy, Law and Ethics of COVID-19 Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 2020.

“Never Done: The Struggle for Health Care” pp. 107-113 in Cynthia Levine-Rasky and Lisa Kowalchuk, eds. We Resist: Defending the Common Good in Hostile Times, Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. 2020.

“Women, Health and Care” Ch. 13. in Toba Bryant, Dennis Raphael and Marcia Rioux, eds. Staying Alive, Third Edition. Critical Perspectives in Health, Illness, and Care Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2019.

“Caring for Seniors the Neo-Liberal Way” (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Tamara Daly and Jacqueline Choiniere) pp. 229-244 in Mark Thomas et al. eds. Change and Continuity: Canadian Political Economy in the New Millennium McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019.

“Complexities, tensions, and promising practices: work in Canadian long-term residential care” (Pat Armstrong and Tamara Daly) Chapter 20 in Karen Christensen and Doria Pilling, eds., The Routledge Handbook of Social Care Work Around the World. London: Routledge, 2018.

“Working for Care: Caring for Work” pp. 101-104 in Patrizia Albanese, Lorne Tepperman and Emily Alexander, eds., Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2017.

"Women's Health in Context: Gender Issues" pp. 82-99 in John Germov and Jennie Hornosty, eds., Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology—2nd Canadian edition. Toronto: Oxford University Press Canada, 2016.

“The Mental Health of Health Care Workers – A Woman’s Issue?” pp. 19-32 in Khanlou N & Pilkington B, eds., Women’s Mental Health: Resistance and Resilience in Community and Society. Advances in Mental Health and Addiction (Series Editor: Masood Zangeneh). New York: Springer, 2015.

“Nurses Unions: Where Knowledge Meets Know-How” (Pat Armstrong and Linda Silas), pp. 158-180 in Majorie McIntyre and Carol McDonald eds., Realities of Canadian Nursing: Professional, Practice and Power Issues. New York: Walters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2014.

“Regulating Care: Lessons from Canada” pp.217-228 in Gabrielle Meagher and Marta Szebehely eds., Marketisation in Nordic Eldercare: A Research Report on Legislation, Oversight, Extent and Consequences. Stockholm: Stockholm University School of Social Work, 2013.

“Women’s Health Centres” pp. 371-86 in Ellen Kuhlmann and Ellen Annandale, eds., The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Healthcare—2nd edition 2013. Basingstoke UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

“Pay Equity in Canada, The Story Continues” (Pat Armstrong and Krista Scott-Dixon), in Gillian Whitehouse, ed., Equal Pay for Women? Trends and Perspectives in Cross-National Perspective. New York: Routledge Press, 2013.

“Health Care ‘Reform’. Privatization and its Impact on Women” in Les Samuelson and Wayne Antony, eds., Power and Resistance: Critical Thinking about Canadian Social Issues—5th Edition. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 2012.

“Pay Equity: Yesterday’s Issue?” pp. 211-214 in Lorne Tepperman and Angela Kalyta, eds., Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives—2nd Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.

“Neoliberalism in Action: Canadian Perspectives” pp. 184-201 in Susan Braedley and Meg Luxton, eds., Neoliberalism and Everyday Life. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2010.

“Gendering Work? Women and Technologies in Health Care” (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and Karen Messing), pp. 122-37 in Ellen Balka, Eileen Green and Flis Henwood, eds., Gender, Health and Information Technology in Context. Basingstoke UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

“Contradictions at Work: Struggles for Control in Canadian Health Care” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 145-67 in Leo Panitch and Colin Leys, eds., Morbid Symptoms: Health under Capitalism. Pontypool Wales: Merlin Press and New York: Monthly Review Press, 2009.

“Managing Care the Canadian Way” pp.370-372 in Johanna Fisher, ed., Biomedical Ethics: A Canadian Focus. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2009.

“Doing Women’s Studies” pp. 250-55 in Wendy Robbins, Meg Luxton, Margrit Eichler, and Francine Descarries, eds., Minds of Our Own: Inventing Feminist Scholarship and Women’s Studies in Canada and Quebec, 1966–76. Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier Press, 2008.

“Las mujeres, el trabajo y el cuidado de los demás en el actual milenio” (“Thinking it Through: Women, Work and Caring in the New Millenium”) (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 195-204 in María Luisa Clark, ed., La mediciόn de las aportaciones de las mujeres a la salud y al desarrollo en las Américas: encuestas sobre el empleo del tiempo y cuentas satélite del sector familiar [Measuring Women’s Contributions to Health and Development in the Americas: Household Satellite Accounts and Time-Use Surveys], 2008.

“Doubtful Data: Why Paradigms Matter in Counting the Health-Care Labor Force” (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong and Kate Laxer), pp. 326-48 in Vivian Shalla and Wallace Clement, eds., Work in Tumultuous Times: Critical Perspectives. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2007.

“Relocating Care: Home Care in Ontario” pp. 528-53 in Marina Morrow, Olena Hankivsky and Colleen Varcoe, eds., Women’s Health in Canada: Critical Perspective on Theory and Policy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007.

“Planning for Care: Approaches to Human Resources Policy and Planning in Health Care” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 117-49 in Pierre Gerlier Forest, Gregory P. Marchildon and Tom McIntosh, eds., Changing Health Care in Canada. Romanow Papers, Volume 2. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004. Translated as “Planification des soins: approches en matière de politiques et de planification des ressources humaines de la santé”, pp. 125-63 in Pierre-Gerlier Forest, Gregory P. Marchildon and Tom McIntosh, eds., Les forces de changement dans le système de santé canadien. Ottawa: Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa, 2004.

“Feminist Methodology” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 11-24 in Merle Jacobs, ed., Is Anyone Listening? Women, Work and Society. Toronto: Women’s Press, 2002. Reprinted from Theorizing Women’s Work, 1990.

“Pay Equity: Complexities and Contradictions in Legal and Social Processes” (Pat Armstrong, Mary Cornish and Elizabeth Millar), pp. 161-82 in Wallace Clement and Leah Vosko, eds., Changing Canada: Political Economy as Transformation. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2003.

“Women and Health: Not Just a Matter of Care” pp. 260-78 in Nancy Mandell, ed., Feminist Issues: Race, Class and Sexuality. Revised Third Edition. Scarborough: Prentice-Hall, 2001.

“Women and Health: Challenges and Changes” pp. 249-66 in Nancy Mandell, ed., Feminist Issues: Race, Class and Sexuality. Revised Second Edition. Scarborough: Prentice-Hall, 1998. Revised from pp. 294-314 in 1995 edition.

“Restructuring Public and Private: Women's Paid and Unpaid Work” pp.37-61 in Susan B. Boyd, ed., Challenging the Public/Private Divide: Feminism, Law and Public Policy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. Revised version pp. 37-61 in Barbara A. Crow and Lise Gotell, eds., Open Boundaries: A Canadian Women’s Studies Reader. Toronto: Prentice-Hall, 2000.

“Pay Equity: Not Just a Matter of Money” pp. 246-65 in Patricia Evans and Gerda Werkerle, eds., Women and the Canadian Welfare State: Challenges and Changes. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. Revised version pp. 122-37 in Caroline Andrew and Sandra Rogers, eds., Women and the Canadian State. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1997.

“From Caring and Sharing to Greedy and Mean?” in André Lapierre, Patricia Smart and Pierre Savard, eds., Language, Culture and Values in Canada at the Dawn of the 21st Century. Ottawa: Carleton University Press, 1996. Revised version published as "The Welfare State as History" pp. 52-71 in Raymond Blake, Penny Bryden and J. Frank Strain, eds., The Welfare State in Canada. Concord: Irwin, 1997, pp. 251-268.

“The Feminization of the Labour Force: Harmonizing Down in A Global Economy” pp. 368-392 in Karen Messing, Barbara Neis and Lucie Dumais, eds. Invisible: La Santé des Travailleuses. Charlottetown: Gynergy, 1995. Revised version pp. 29-54 in Isabella Bakker, ed., Rethinking Restructuring: Gender and Change in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996.

“Unraveling the Safety Net: Transformations in Health Care and Their Impact on Women” pp. 129-50 in Janine Brodie, ed., Women and Canadian Public Policy. Toronto: Harcourt Brace, 1995.

“Professions, Unions or What? Learning from Nurses” pp. 304-24 in Linda Briskin and Patricia McDermott, eds., Women Challenging Unions: Feminism, Democracy, and Militancy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993.

“Women as Victims, Women as Actors” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 299-310 in James Curtis, Edward Grabb and Neil Guppy, eds., Social Inequality in Canada—2nd edition. Scarborough: Prentice-Hall, 1993. Reprinted from Theorizing Women's Work, 1990.

“Women and Work: Learning From the Research Experience” pp. 135-46 in Joan Brockman and Dorothy E. Chunn, eds., Investigating Gender Bias in the Law: Socio-Legal Perspectives. Toronto: Thompson, 1993.

“Limited Possibilities and Possible Limits for Pay Equity” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 110-21 in Patricia McDermott and Judy Fudge, eds., Just Wages: A Feminist Assessment of Pay Equity. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1991.

“Understanding the Numbers: Women in the Film and Television Industry” pp. 3-38 in Toronto Women in Film and Television, ed., Changing Focus: The Future of Women in the Canadian Film and Television Industry. Toronto: TWIF, 1991.

“Taking Women into Account: Redefining and Intensifying Employment in Canada” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 65-84 in Elizabeth Hagen, Jane Jenson and Trudi Koziol, eds., Feminization of the Labour Force: Paradoxes and Promises. Cambridge: Polity and New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

“Women, Family and Economy” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 143-74 in Ann Duffy and Nancy Mandell, eds., The Canadian Family: Feminist Reflections. Scarborough: Butterworths, 1988.

“Women's Work: Women's Wages” pp. 354-76 in Greta Hofmann Nemiroff, ed., Women and Men: Interdisciplinary Readings on Gender. Toronto: Fitzhenry and Whiteside, 1987.

“Women, Technology and the Economic Crisis” pp. 43-96 in John F. Peters, ed., Work in Canada. Occasional Paper No. 4. Waterloo: Interdisciplinary Research Committee, Wilfred Laurier University, 1986.

“Women” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), pp. 36-43 in Daniel Drache and Wallace Clement, eds., A Practical Guide to Canadian Political Economy. Revised Second Edition. Toronto: Lorimer, 1985.

Other Publications

Co-editor of special journal issues
“Introducing an Evidence Base” (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong), Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 6.2, (2008).

“Benefiting Women? Women’s Labour Rights” (Pat Armstrong, Linda Christiansen-Ruffman et al.), Canadian Woman Studies 23, (2004): 3-4.

"Privatization" (Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, and M. Patricia Connelly), Studies in Political Economy 53, (Summer 1997).

“Feminism and Political Economy” (Pat Armstrong and M. Patricia Connelly), Studies in Political Economy 30, (Fall 1989).

“Feminist Scholarship” (Pat Armstrong and Roberta Hamilton), Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology (25th Anniversary Issue) 25.2, (May 1988).

“Domestic and Wage Labour” (Pat Armstrong and M. Patricia Connelly), Atlantis 6.3, (Fall 1981).

Bookettes edited (evidence-informed, accessible, small books, free to download)
Negotiating Tensions in Long-Term Residential Care: Ideas Worth Sharing (Pat Armstrong and Ruth Lowndes, eds) Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2018, 134 pp.

Exercising Choice in Long-Term Residential Care. (Pat Armstrong and Tamara Daly, eds.) Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2017. 128 pp

Physical Environments for Long Term Care: Ideas Worth Sharing. (Pat Armstrong and Susan Braedley, eds.) Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2016. 112pp

Promising Practices in Long Term Care: Ideas Worth Sharing. (Donna Baines and Pat Armstrong, eds.) Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2015/16. 84pp.

  • Rik Davidson/SPE Book Prize for Wash, Wear and Care (with Suzanne Day). 2019
  • YWCA Toronto Woman of Distinction Award, 2018
  • Post-doctoral Supervisor Award, York University, 2017
  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (2011–)
  • Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, York University (2010–)
  • Ethel Meade Award, Ontario Health Coalition (2007)
  • Canadian Sociology & Anthropology Association Award for Outstanding Contribution to Sociology (2002)
  • Dean's Award for Outstanding Contribution in Teaching, York University (1991-92)

Because I understand knowledge creation as a shared activity, almost all of my research and writing has been carried out with others and in partnership with unions as well as with community groups. Because I do research and writing not only to understand the world but also to change it (to reference one well-known theorist), I seek to be accessible not only in terms of style but also in terms of where and how I publish or present. Because I see all research as a dialogue between theory and evidence (to quote another well-known theorist) my feminist political economy approach is in constant development. In the process, I learn from and with students both in the classroom and in my research projects.


Sylvia Bawa

Associate Professor

B.A. (First Class Honours), University of Ghana, Sociology and Psychology, (2004), M.A., Brock University, Social Justice and Equity Studies, (2007), Ph.D., Queen’s University, Sociology, (2013).

Twitter: @Essenbi

Faculty Profile
Research

I am a global sociologist whose research links globalization, human rights, postcolonial feminism and development theory. With a specific focus on women’s rights and empowerment in Africa, my work examines the ways in which historical forces and events shape current political, economic, cultural and social circumstances whilst highlighting the particular contradictory and paradoxical outcomes they produce at national, global and local levels. Among others, my publications on these topics appear in top-ranking journals such as Third World Quarterly, African Identities, Qualitative Report, Development in Practice, Canadian Journal of African Studies, chapters in the International Human Rights of Women, and the Palgrave Handbook of African Women's Studies (Springer Major Reference Works Series).

Research areas

Human Rights, Globalization, Women’s rights, Postcolonial and African Feminisms, Gender and Development.

Current Research Activities

Currently, I am the principal investigator or co-investigator on the following SSHRC-funded Partnership projects:

  1. (2019–2022), Principal Investigator, Research/Dissemination Network on the Canada’s Human Rights Role in Sub-Saharan Africa (CARRISSA)—a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) funded Partnership which examines Canada/Africa transnational human rights engagements.
  2. (2020) Assessing Canada’s Women’s Empowerment Programs in Africa, Deans Awards for Research Excellence (York University)
  3. (2018–2022). Co-Investigator, Confronting Atrocity: Truth Commissions, National Reconciliation and the Politics of Memory. SSHRC Partnership Grant. The Confronting Atrocities Project studies the role of truth commissions in post-conflict reconstruction and democratic transitions by paying attention to the tensions in their truth seeking and reconciliation mandates.
  4. (2018–2022). Co-Investigator, The GMO 2.0 Partnership SSHRC Partnership Development Grant. The projects investigates how new agricultural technologies impact gender equality in four countries (Kenya, Uganda, South Africa and Ghana)

Selected Research Grants

Bawa, S. (2019–2021), Principal Investigator, Research/Dissemination Network on the Canada's Human Rights Role in Sub-Saharan Africa (CARRISSA).

Bawa, S. (2017–2022), Collaborator, Urbanization, gender and the global south: a transformative knowledge network. Principal Investigator, Prof. Peake, L. Department of Geography SSHRC Partnership Grant).

Bawa, S. (2017–2018), Co-Investigator, The Research/Dissemination Network on the Development of the African Union's African Human Rights Action Plan (AHRAP-NET), Principal Investigator: Prof. Okafor, O., Osgoode, York University). SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant.

Bawa, S. (2018–20). Co-Investigator, Confronting Atrocity: Truth Commissions, National Reconciliation and the Politics of Memory. Principal Investigator, Prof. Bonny Ibawoh, McMaster University. SSHRC Partnership Grant.

Bawa, S. (2018–2020). Co-Investigator, The GMO 2.0 Partnership. Principal Investigator, Dr.
Matthew Schnurr, Dalhousie University. SSHRC Partnership Development Grant.

Bawa, S. (2014–2017): Principal Investigator, International Collaboration Grant, York University.

Bawa, S. (2010): Principal Investigator, International Development Research Centre (IDRC). Doctoral Research Award for Field Research.

I supervise students in my area of expertise.

Graduate Students Supervised

Doctoral Theses Supervision Committees

  • Nwajiaku, Adaora, Ph.D. Dissertation, Osgoode Law School (Committee Member, Feb. 2020–present).
  • Jade Da Costa, Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, York University (Committee member, November 2019–present)
  • Jake O. Effoduh, Ph.D. Dissertation, Osgoode Law School (Committee Member, September 2017–present)
  • Rita Nketia, Ph. D. Dissertation, Department of Geography (Committee Member, September 2015–2020)
  • Nadiya Ali—Sociology, Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member (2018–Present)
  • Beatrice Anane-Bediakoh—Sociology, Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member (2018–Present)

Ph.D. Examination Committees

  • Sara Ghremusse, Osgoode Law School (May, 2020). Internal/External Examiner
  • Aliya Amarshi, Sociology (July, 2018). Chair and Dean’s Representative
  • Nergis Canafe, Graduate Program in Law, Osgoode Law School (October 2017). Internal/External Examiner
  • John Matthew Hayter, Social and Political Thought (January, 2017)—Internal/External
  • Wangui Kimari, Anthropology (October, 2017). Internal/External

MA Theses Examination Committees

  • Leva Rouhani, MA Thesis, Interdisciplinary Studies, York University (Internal/External Examiner, Dec. 2015)
  • Kwakyewah, Cynthia MA Thesis, Interdisciplinary Studies, York University (Internal/External), September 2018

Courses Taught

Graduate Courses
SOCI 6200: Contemporary Topics in Contemporary Theory: Postcolonial and Third World Feminisms

Undergraduate Courses
AP/SOCI 4450: 6.00 (F/W) Women in Development. York University
AP/SOCI 3650: 6.00 (F/W) Sociology of Religion. York University,
AP/SOCI 2050: 6.00 (F/W) Social Structure and Social Change. York University
SOCY 225: Sociology of Globalization—January 2012–April 2012 Queen’s University

Selected Chapters in Books

Bawa S. (2020) Culture, Rights, and African Women’s Futures. In: Yacob-Haliso O., Falola T. (eds.). The Palgrave Handbook of African Women's Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-77030-7_41-1 (invited contribution)

Bawa, S. (2019). Women and the Human Rights Paradigm in the African Context. In, Reilly, N (2019). (Ed.) International Human Rights of Women, 107–120. Springer Major Reference Works Series (Part of the Part of the International Human Rights book series (IHR) (invited contribution)

Bawa, S. (2020). The Third World Interventionist Imperative: Ethics, Crises and Women, in Kyriakides, C. & Torres, R. (Eds.) (2018) Borders of Mass Destruction: Racialization, “the Refugee” and National Belonging. Routledge. 7200 words (forthcoming, 2020)

Baffoe, H. J. B., Bawa, S., Andrews, N., Oduro, R., (2013). Beyond Access: Challenges in Women’s Higher Education in Ghana, in Andrews et al. (eds.) Africa Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow: Exploring the Multi-Dimensional Discourses on 'Development'. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, (pg. 230-247).

Other Publications

(Opening commentary/field note to introduce a book chapter)

Bawa, S. (2014). Gold, History and Women in Post-Colonial Ghana. chapter 3. Fouberg, et al., Human Geography: People, Place, and Culture. (Second Canadian Edition). Canada: John Wiley & Sons Canada Ltd.

Selected Refereed Journal Articles

Okafor, O., Miyawa, M., Bawa, S., & Odumosu-Ayanu, I. (2020). Assessing the African Union's 2016–19 Human Rights Action Planning Process: Embracing, and De-Coupling from, the Conventional “Ideal”. Journal of African Law, 64(2), 143-172. doi:10.1017/S0021855320000121

Dery, I., & Bawa, S. (2019). Agency, Social Status and Performing Marriage in Postcolonial Societies. Journal of Asian and African Studies, 54(7), 980–994., doi:0021909619851148.

Andrews, N., & Bawa, S. (2019). "People come and go but we don't see anything": How Might Social Research Contribute to Social Change? The Qualitative Report, 24(11), 2874-2890.doi:

Bawa, S. (2018). “Feminists make too much noise!”: generational differences and ambivalence in feminist development politics in Ghana. Canadian Journal of African Studies/Revue canadienne des études africaines, 52(1), 1-17. doi: 10.1080/00083968.2018.1462720

Bawa, S. and Grace A. Ogunyankin (2018). (Un) African women: identity, class and moral geographies in postcolonial times. African Identities, 1-16. doi: 10.1080/14725843.2018.1474340 8740 words. 50% contribution

Bawa, S. (2017). Assessing Universalism and the Rhetoric of Development Assistance in Human Rights Research: Canadian-Ghanaian Human Rights Engagements. Transnational Human Rights Review 4, (28). 7200 words, doi: hp://digitalcommons.osgoode.yorku.ca/thr/vol4/iss1/3

Bawa, S. (2017). Christianity, tradition, and gender inequality in postcolonial Ghana. African Geographical Review, 1-16, doi: 10.1080/19376812.2017.1286245

Bawa, S. (2016). Paradoxes of (dis) empowerment in the postcolony: women, culture and social capital in Ghana. Third World Quarterly, 37(1), 119-135.

Andrews, N. & Bawa, S. (2014). A Post-Development Hoax? (Re)-Examining the Past, Present and Future of Development Studies. Third World Quarterly, 35 (6), 922-938, 50% contribution. doi: 10.1080/01436597.2014.907704

Bawa, S. & Sanyare, F. (2013). Women’s Political Participation and Representation in Africa: Perspectives from Ghana. International Journal of Public Administration, 36 (4), 282–291, 50% contribution, doi: 10.1080/01900692.2012.757620

Bawa, S. (2013). Autonomy and Policy Independence in Africa: A Review of NGO Development Challenges. Development in Practice, 23(4), 526-536. doi: 10.1080/09614524.2013.790935

Bawa, S. (2012). Women's rights and culture in Africa: a dialogue with global patriarchal traditions. Canadian Journal of Development Studies/Revue canadienne d'études du développement, 33 (1), 90-105, doi: 10.1080/02255189.2012.664545

Other Publications

Non-Refereed Publication
Bawa, S. (2017) Canada’s ‘Feminist’ Aid Program Creates More Questions Than Answers. In News Deeply (Women and Girls). www.newsdeeply.com/womenandgirls/

  • 2017: John O’Neill Award for Teaching Excellence, Department of Sociology, York University
  • 2011: Winner, Polanyi-Levitt Paper Prize competition $1,000
    –Prize awarded to the best graduate student paper in international development for the Canadian Association of International Development
  • 2010: Finalist, Trudeau Canada Doctoral Research Awards
  • 2009: Queen’s University’s Institutional Nomination for Vanier Canada Scholarship Award
  • 2008: Institutional Nomination for Vanier Canada Scholarship Award (One of three candidates nominated by Queen’s University)
  • 2007: Canadian International Development Association-Canadian Federation of Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Student Competition Award, $2,000

York University Service

  • 2018–2019: Tubman Talks Coordinator and Executive Committee Member, Tubman Centre, York University
  • 2017–present: Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Sociology Department, York University
  • 2016–2018: Member, Faculty of Graduate Studies ‘Academic Planning and Policy Committee, York University.
  • 2015–Present: Executive Committee Member, African Studies Program, LA&PS, York University.
  • 2013–2016: Member, Graduate Program Curriculum Committee, Sociology Department, York University.
  • 2013–2017: Member, Tenure and Promotion Committee, Sociology Department, York University.

Service to Academic Communities beyond York University

  • July 2020–July 2023, Member, Editorial Team. Studies in Social Justice (Open-Access Journal)
  • 2016–2019. Member, Board of Directors - Canadian Association of African Studies
    • Reviewer, Third World Quarterly (Journal) (3)
    • Reviewer, Development in Practice (Journal) (3)
    • Advisory Board, The Conversation Africa, Global (Gender and Sexuality)
  • 2010–2012: Co-Organizer, Queen’s Feminist Discussion Group, Queen’s University.
  • 2009–2012: Member, Equity Committee, Sociology Department, Queen’s University.
  • 2009: Member of Steering Committee, Africa Days Symposium at Queen’s University.
  • May 2009: Member of Organizing Committee for The Measure of a Revolution: 50 Years of the Cuban Revolution. Queen’s University.
  • May 2009: Member of Organising Committee for the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of African Studies. Queen’s University.
  • 2009: Student advisor for the School of Graduate and Professional Studies, Queens University.
  • 2008/2009: Graduate Student Representative to the Sociology Departmental Committee, Queen’s University.

Membership in Professional Organizations

  • African Studies Association (ASA)—2013–present.
  • Network of Women’s Rights in Ghana (NETWRIGHT)—2010–present.
  • Canadian Sociological Association—2011–present.
  • British Sociological Association—2008–2010.
  • Canadian Association of African Studies—2008–present.
  • Canadian Association for Studies in International Development—2008–2012.
  • American Association of Geographers—2008–present.

Leadership and Community Involvement

  • 2014–Present: African Women and Feminist Reading and Mentoring Group, Toronto (20 members)
  • 2015–Present: Member, Ghanaian-Canadian Association of Ontario

I believe that research must serve the public interests, especially of revealing the relational links in our collective existence. I do public sociology through engagements with community, the general public and media.


photo of Kathy BischopingKathy Bischoping

Associate Professor

BMath Statistics and Combinatorics & Optimization, Waterloo, (1987),
MSc Biostatistics, Michigan, (1989),
PhD Sociology, Michigan, (1995).

Faculty Profile
Researchgate

Biography

Coming soon

Qualitative methods, particularly interviewing methods and arts- and performance-based methods; Narrative and discourse analysis, particularly pertaining to oral history.

Graduate Supervision

I’m often asked to join supervisory and comprehensives committees as a “methods person”. On comprehensives, I’m a fan of the option to design a course syllabus and write an accompanying lecture. In my view, this option is not only useful when students have job applications in mind, but also poses fascinating intellectual challenges. In supervision, I care about students’ writing (my office has a shelf of writing books) and about the cohesion between a project’s research methods and its theoretical position. I decide about taking new students based on whether I can genuinely contribute to the project, and how the student’s planned timeline fits with my upcoming responsibilities.

At the graduate level, I teach:
SOCI 6995 Interviewing Methods,
SOCI 6090 Selected Topics in Empirical Methods: Narrative Analysis,
SOCI 5995 MA Seminar

Books

K. Bischoping and A. Gazso. (2016) Analyzing Talk in the Social Sciences: Narrative, Conversation and Discourse Strategies. London, UK: SAGE. us.sagepub.com

K. Bischoping and Y. Ishii, guest editors (April 2017) Special Issue on Generations and Memory: Continuity and Change, Oral History Forum d’histoire orale. www.oralhistoryforum.ca

Select Refereed Journal Articles

K. Bischoping and Z. Gao. (February 2020) “‘Learn from Lei Feng!’: Generations and memories of a Chinese Communist hero”. Historical Encounters Special Issue “The Politics and Practices of Memory Media in History Education”, 7(2), hej.hermes-history.net

Z. Gao and K. Bischoping (August 2019). “The Communist hero and the April Fools’ joke: A case study in the cultural politics of authentication and fakery.” Social Anthropology Special Issue “An Anthropology of Defrauding and Faking”, 27(3), 438-54. 10.1111/1469-8676.12593

R. Chisholm and K. Bischoping (July 2019). “The narrative self in rural dementia: A case study from eastern Nova Scotia.” Ageing & Society 39(7), 1436-58. 10.1017/S0144686X18000089

A. Gazso and K. Bischoping (2018). “Feminist reflections on the relation of emotions to ethics: A case study of two awkward interviewing moments.” Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research 19(3), Art. 7 10.17169/fqs-19.3.3118

K. Bischoping and Z. Gao (2018). “Reframing generations scholarship through the eyes of ordinary Chinese.” Chinese Sociological Dialogue 3(2):133-47. journals.sagepub.com

Z. Gao and K. Bischoping (2018). “The emergence of an anti-elder discourse in 21st-century China.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 33(2):197-215. 10.1007/s10823-018-9347-7

K. Bischoping and Z. Gao (2017). “Story sequencing and stereotyping: A case study from talk about the crowded buses of China.” Narrative Inquiry 27(1):85-108. 10.1075/ni.27.1.05bis

K. Bischoping, S. Chapman-Nyaho and R. Raby (2016). “Linking visuality to justice through international covers of Discipline and Punish.” The Annual Review of Interdisciplinary Justice Research 5:180-215. c0c42d9a-a170-4571-949c-ea8bd55b102f.filesusr.com/ugd/bab59a_a1047d0db09c4ae798234ecfcab74959.pdf (.pdf)

Recent Book Chapters

A. Gazso and K. Bischoping (2018). “Reframing an awkward moment: A comparison of two analytic strategies for being reflexive.” pp. 256-262 in S. Kleinknecht, L.-J. van den Scott, & C.B. Sanders, eds., The Craft of Qualitative Research, Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. coursepack.cspi.org

K. Bischoping, R. Abdelbaki, K. Ahmed, K. Banasiak, and D. Gül Kaya (2017). “Unsettling Orientalism: Edward W. Said’s (1978) book and its covers.” pp. 122-139 in S. Saffari, R. Akhbari, K. Abdolmaki, & E. Hamdon (eds.), Unsettling Colonial Modernity in Islamicate Contexts. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. ucmconf.com

R. Chisholm, C. Weaving, & K. Bischoping (2016). “Girl Power figures, mythic Amazons, and neoliberal risk performers: Discursively situating women who participate in Mixed Martial Arts.” pp. 279-298 in H. Thorpe & R. Olive, eds., Women in Action Sport Cultures: Identity, Politics, Experience and Pedagogy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. www.palgrave.com

K. Bischoping (2014). “Identity and mutability in family stories about the Third Reich.” pp.56-73 in Ivana Maček (ed.), Engaging Violence: Trauma, Memory and Representation. London: Routledge. www.routledge.com

Other Publications

Recent non-refereed works:

K. Bischoping and A.D.K. King (2020). “The forgotten work of cultural workers: A case study from the Toronto theatre community.” Labour/Le Travail 84, 259-278. 10.1353/llt.2019.0039

K. Bischoping (2018). “Revisiting a boy named Jim: Using narrative analysis to prompt reflexivity.” Special invited paper, International Journal of Qualitative Methods 17: 1-12. 10.1177/1609406918809167

K. Bischoping (2017). “Generations and memory: A meeting of modern concepts and postmodern questions.” Oral History Forum d’histoire orale 37 Special Issue on Generations and Memory: Continuity and Change: 1-8. www.oralhistoryforum.ca

Book Review Editor, Oral History Forum d’histoire orale, March 2016–February 2018
Reading Committee, Expanding the Canon Project, Hedgepig Ensemble, 2021. [This is a theatre project aimed at expanding the representation of women and gender non-conforming playwrights.]

K. Bischoping (2018). Keynote address, “What ‘good stories’ have to do with reflexivity”, Qualitative Methods Conference, International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, Banff, Alberta, May 1-3.
Parents' Association University-Wide Teaching Award, York University, selected by Senate Committee on Teaching and Learning, 1997
John O'Neill Award for Teaching Excellence, York University, selected by Sociology Undergraduate Student Association and Department of Sociology, 1995


photo of Debi BrockDebi Brock

Associate Professor

B.A., Sociologyand Canadian Studies, University of Waterloo, (1982),
M.A., Sociology, Carleton University, (1984),
Ph.D., Sociology, OISE/University of Toronto, (1990).

Faculty Profile
Website

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and affiliated with Socio-Legal Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research. When I encountered sociology in the first year of my undergraduate degree, I knew that it was right for me because it was an umbrella discipline that encompassed many of the areas that sparked my curiosity, including history, anthropology, Canadian society, literature, political science and more. Choosing sociology was a way to embrace something from all of these areas, while honing a distinct sociological lens through which to understand the social, material and spiritual world. Later, it was sociological knowledge that compelled me to become more involved in activism for social justice and social change; in the women’s movement, labour struggles, anti-racist alliances, international solidarity, HIV/AIDS Activism, and queer politics. Although it has been some time since I have been able to describe myself as an activist, these movements nevertheless inform and inspire my ongoing work as a sociologist.

I completed my PhD in Sociology at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, in 1990, under the supervision of Dorothy E. Smith. My dissertation, ‘Regulating Prostitution, Policing Prostitutes: Some Canadian Examples, 1970-1989'’ was later published (in a much-revised form) by the University of Toronto Press. My early interest in sex work connected me to a Junior Research Fellowship, and later a Post-Doctoral Fellowship, at the Centre for Criminology, University of Toronto. Following my post-doc, I was employed on a contractual basis at a number of universities, until I secured a tenure-stream position at York University in 2000. Between completion of my PhD and securing a position at York, I joined with an impressive group of women to form the History of Sexuality Study Group, where we supported one another in crafting our dissertations into published books. I also engaged in front line work with street-involved youth, specifically young men involved in sex work. I mention all of these elements of my biography because they were crucial to the formation of my sociological practice; simply put, I don’t think that I could have ‘fit’ (however awkwardly) into academic life without them.

My area of research can be broadly described as social, sexual and moral regulation.
My theoretical approach can best be described as a materialist governmentality. My writing in this area stemmed from my search to find scholarship in governmentality studies that complimented my materialist approach and that was accessible to undergraduate students. It became clear that I would need to produce these books myself. This resulted in two sole-edited and two co-edited books, which are listed in my bibliography. Throughout my practice, I have prioritized developing an accessible writing style that can appeal to laypersons and people new to scholarly writing.

My early research focused primarily on sexual labour, leading to the publication of the book, Making Work, Making Trouble: The Social Regulation of Sexual Labour 1998. However, I no longer research or supervise in this area. Most recently, I am best described as a generalist, drawn to the bigger picture of social and political events, such as the rise of authoritarian populism and surveillance technologies (although I cannot claim expertise in these areas!). I aspire to return to the kind of popular sociological writing that I produced for community-based publications, many years ago.

Research areas

Social, sexual and moral regulation, Materialist governmentality, Sexuality studies

Books

Brock, Deborah, Aryn Martin, Mark Thomas, and Rebecca Raby (Editors) Power and Everyday Practices University of Toronto Press, 2019.

Deborah Brock (Editor) Re-Making Normal: Governing the Social in Neoliberal Times University of British Columbia Press, 2019.

Deborah Brock, Amanda Glasbeek and Carmela Murdocca (Editors) Criminalization, Representation and Regulation Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014.

Brock, Deborah, Mark Thomas, and Rebecca Raby (Editors) Power and Everyday Practices Nelson, 2012.

Making Work, Making Trouble: The Social Regulation of Sexual Labour Toronto: University of Toronto Press, Second Edition 2009 (First Edition 1998).

Making Normal: Social Regulation in Canada (Editor) Toronto: Nelson, 2003.


Nergis Canefe

Associate Professor

SJD (Osgoode Hall Law School, Canada), Ph.D (York University)

Faculty Profile
Latest Publications

Professor Nergis Canefe (PhD & SJD) is a Turkish-Canadian scholar of public international law, comparative politics, forced migration studies and critical human rights. She has held posts in several European and Turkish Universities and is a faculty member at York University, Canada since 2003. She regularly serves at the executive board of several international organizations, including International Association of Forced Migration Studies, and is the co-editor of Journal of Conflict Transformation and Security. She penned close to 100 scholarly articles and several books, Transitional Justice and Forced Migration (edited volume, 2019, Cambridge University Press), The Syrian Exodus (monograph, 2018, Bilgi University), The Jewish Diaspora as a Paradigm: Politics, Religion and Belonging (edited volume, 2014, Libra Press –Jewish Studies Series), Milliyetcilik, Kimlik ve Aidiyet (monograph, 2006, Nationalism, Identity and Belonging], Istanbul: Bilgi University Publishing House), and Turkey and European Integration: Accession Prospects and Issues (2004, edited volume in collaboration with Mehmet Ugur, Routledge). Her most recent book is Limits of Universal Jurisdiction: A Critical Debate on Crimes against Humanity (University of Manchester International Law Series, in press), to be followed by a volume on Unorthodox Minorities in the Middle East and Comparative Politics of Administrative Law in the Middle East. Her scholarly work appeared in Nations and Nationalism, Citizenship Studies, New Perspectives, Refugee Watch, Refuge, South East European Studies, Peace Review, Middle Eastern Law and Governance, Journal of International Human Rights, and, Narrative Politics. Professor Canefe is also a trained artist and her designs and murals have been showcased regularly since 2008.


Sheila L. Cavanagh

Professor

Faculty Profile
Website

Biography

Sheila L. Cavanagh is a professor at York University, Toronto and clinical sociologist. She coordinated the Sexuality Studies Program at York (2010–2014) and is past chair of the Sexuality Studies Association (Canada) (2014–2016). She co-edited the Somatechnics Journal for four years (2016–2018). Cavanagh was an assistant professor of education at Western University (1999–2004), London, Ontario, before coming to York. Her research is in the area of psychoanalytic sociology, gender and sexuality studies. Cavanagh is also a sociotherapist certified by the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology and undergoing psychoanalytic psychotherapy training at the Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis. She uses her clinical work to inform her social psychoanalytic research program and teaching.

Research areas

Professor Cavanagh’s scholarship is in psychoanalytic sociology, gender and sexuality studies. She has published her research in queer theory, transgender studies and psychoanalysis in a wide range of international journals and given keynotes addresses at conferences in Sweden, Turkey, England and the United States and Canada. Cavanagh also does research in performance ethnography and used the method to share her work with non-academic communities. Cavanagh wrote a play based on interviews from her second book Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality and the Hygienic Imagination (2010) and staged it as a professional production at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre in 2014. The research-based production has toured at conferences, colleges and universities in Canada and the United States. Most recently, she has given presentations on transgender studies at the Freud Museum in London, England. Presently, she is completing a book titled Transgender and the Other Sexual Difference: An Ettingerian Perspective.

Professor Cavanagh usually teaches the following undergraduate courses:
Sociology of Gender (AP/SOCI 3690A);
Bodies, Genders, Sexualities (AP/SOCI 4470M).

Professor Cavanagh is currently teaching the following graduate courses:
Studies in Sexual Regulation (GS/SOCI 6181M);
Race, Psyche and Sexuality in Psychoanalytic Perspective (SPTH 6402M).

Graduate Supervision

Professor Cavanagh supervises Masters and Doctoral students in five graduate programs at York University: The Graduate Program in Sociology; The Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; The Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; the Graduate Program in Music; and the Graduate Program in Theatre.

Books (Authored)

Cavanagh, S.L. (2010). Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality, and the Hygienic Imagination. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Cavanagh, S.L. (2007). Sexing the Teacher: School Sex Scandals and Queer Pedagogies. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

In Progress

Cavanagh, S.L. (In progress). Transgender and the Other Sexual Difference: Bracha L. Ettinger & Jacques Lacan.

Books (Co-dited)

Cavanagh, S.L., Failler, A., and Hurst Alpha Johnston, R. (2013). Skin, Culture and Psychoanalysis. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Chapters in Books

14. Cavanagh, S.L. (2019). Tiresias: Bracha L. Ettinger and the Transgeression with-in-to the Feminine. In A. Piortrowska & B. Tyrer, (Eds.). Femininity and Psychoanalysis: Cinema, Culture, Theory. New York: Routledge.

13. Cavanagh, S.L. (2018). Principles for psychoanalytic work with trans clients. In O. Gozlan (Ed.), International Handbook of Transsexuality and Mental Health. New York: Routledge.

12. Cavanagh, S.L. (2017). The queer body politics of the bathroom. In A. Gorman-Murray and M. Cook (Eds.), Queering the Interior. London and New York: Bloomsbury.

11. Cavanagh, S.L. (2014). Gender, sexuality and race in the Lacanian mirror: Urinary Segregation and the Bodily Ego. In P. Kingsbury & S. Pile (Eds.), Psychoanalytic Geographies (pp. 323–338). Surrey, England: Ashgate.

10. Cavanagh, S.L. (2013). Touching gender: Abjection and the hygienic imagination. In S. Stryker & A.Z. Aizura (Eds.), The Transgender Studies Reader 2 (pp. 426-442). New York: Routledge.

9. Cavanagh, S.L. (2013). White trash: Aileen Wuornos and queer productions of monstrosity. In S. Cavanagh, A. Failler, & R. Hurst (Eds.), Skin, Culture and Psychoanalysis (pp. 240–267). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

8. Cavanagh, S.L. (2012). Sexing the teacher: Voyeuristic pleasure in the Amy Gehring case. In M. Fitzgerald and S. Rayter (Eds.), Queerly Canadian: An Introductory Reader in Sexuality Studies (pp. 311–328). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press. (Reprint)

7. Cavanagh, S.L., and Sykes, H. (2012). Transsexual bodies at the Olympics: The international Olympic policy on transsexual athletes at the Athens Summer Games. In M. Fitzgerald & S. Rayter (Eds.), Queerly Canadian: An Introductory Reader in Sexuality Studies (pp. 409–426). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press. (Reprint)

6. Cavanagh, S.L., Ellingson, C., & Spencer, B.L. (2012). Subjectivity and discipline: Women teachers and contradictory norms of recognition. In B.L. Spencer, K. D. Gariepy, K. Dehli, B. Spencer, & J. Ryan (Eds.), Canadian Education: Governing Practices and Producing Subjects (pp. 57–76). Calgary: Detselig Press.

5. Cavanagh, S.L. (2011). Queer notes on sex education in Ontario. In D. Stanley & K. Young (Eds.), Contemporary Studies in Canadian Curriculum: Principles, Portraits and Practices (pp. 237–269). Calgary: Detselig Press.

4. Cavanagh, S.L. (2009). Sex in the lesbian teacher’s closet: The hybrid proliferation of queers in school. In J. Dillabough, J. McLeod, & M. Mills (Eds.), Troubling Gender in Education (pp. 83–95). London and New York: Routledge.

3. Cavanagh, S.L. (2005). Female teacher gender and sexuality in twentieth-century Ontario, Canada. In R. Coulter & H. Harper (Eds.), History is Hers: Women Educators in Twentieth Century Ontario (pp. 111–136). Calgary: Detselig.

2. Cavanagh, S.L. (2005). Nervous narratives: Female teacher maladies in the twentieth century. In R. Coulter & H. Harper (Eds.), History is Hers: Women Educators in Twentieth Century Ontario (pp.193–210). Calgary: Detselig.

1. Cavanagh, S.L. (1999). The heterosexualization of the Ontario woman teacher in the postwar period. In N. Amin, et al. (Eds.), Canadian Woman Studies: An Introductory Reader (1st ed.). (pp. 387–395). Toronto: Inanna Publications and Education Inc. Reprinted in M. Gleason and A. Perry (Eds.). (2006). Rethinking Canada: The Promise of Women’s History (5th ed.). (pp. 278–86). Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Chapters in Books (In Progress)

Cavanagh, S.L. (Accepted). Transpsychoanalytics. In P. Gherovici & M. Steinkoler (Eds.), Psychoanalysis, Gender and Sexuality. Cambridge University Press.

Cavanagh, S.L. (Invited). “The discourse of the pervert and the jouissance of race in Portrait of Jason.” Lacanian Psychoanalysis and Race. Edited by Sheldon George and Derek Hook. Routlege Press

Special Issues of Journals—Sole Editor

Transgender Studies Quarterly, Special double issue: “Transgender and Psychoanalysis”. 4(4). 2017. (TSQ is a journal published by Duke University Press.)

Papers in Scholarly Journals (Refereed)

21. Cavanagh, S.L. “Queer Theory, Psychoanalysis and the Symptom: A Lacanian Approach. Studies in Gender and Sexuality 20.4 (2019): 226-230.

20. Cavanagh, S. L. "Transgender, Hysteria, and the Other Sexual Difference: An Ettingerian Approach." Studies in Gender and Sexuality 20.1 (2019): 36-50.

19. Cavanagh, S.L. (2018). Transcryptums: An Ettingerian Reading of the Trans-subjective Landscape in Transparent Transgender Studies Quarterly, 6(1): 20-42.

18. Cavanagh, S.L. (2018). Transgender Embodiment: A Lacanian Approach. The Psychoanalytic Review, 105(3), 303-327.

17. Cavanagh, S.L. (2018). Bracha L. Ettinger, Jacques Lacan and Tiresias: the Other Sexual Difference. Sitegeist: A Journal for Psychoanalysis and Philosophy. Issue 13. London: The Site for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 32-50.

16. Cavanagh, S.L. (2017). Antigone’s legacy: A feminist psychoanalytic of an Other sexual difference. MAMSIE: Studies in the Maternal, 9(1), 4. DOI: doi.org/10.16995/sim.223

15. Cavanagh, S.L. (2016). Tiresias and psychoanalysis with/out Oedipus. European Journal of Psychoanalysis. Retrieved from www.journal-psychoanalysis.eu/

14. Cavanagh, S.L. (2016). Transsexuality as sinthome: Bracha L. Ettinger and the Other (Feminine) sexual difference. Studies in Gender and Sexuality, 17(1), 27-44.

13. Cavanagh. S.L. (2013). Affect, performance and ethnographic methods in Queer Bathroom Monologues. Text and Performance Quarterly, 33(4), 1-22.

12. Cavanagh, S.L. (2008). Sex in the lesbian teacher’s closet: The hybrid proliferation of queers in school. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education 29(3), 387-399.

11. Cavanagh, S.L. & Sykes, H. (2006). Transsexual bodies at the Olympics: The international Olympic policy on transsexual athletes at the Athens Summer Games. Body and Society 12(3), 75-102.

10. Cavanagh, S.L. (2006). Spinsters, schoolmarms, and queers: The unmarried teacher in
medicine and psychoanalytic theory. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 27(4), 421-440.

9. Cavanagh, S.L. (2005). Sexing the teacher: Voyeuristic pleasure in the Amy Gehring case, Social Text 82 (1), 111-134.

8. Cavanagh, S.L. (2005). Female-teacher gender and sexuality in twentieth-century Ontario, Canada. History of Education Quarterly 45(2), 247-273.

7. Cavanagh, S.L. (2004). Upsetting desires in the classroom: School sex scandals and the pedagogy of the femme fatale. Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society, 9 (1), 315-332.

6. Cavanagh, S.L. (2003). Teacher transsexuality: The illusion of sexual difference and the idea of adolescent trauma. Sexualities: Studies in Culture and Society, 6 (3-4), 365–388.

5. Cavanagh, S.L. (2003). The gender of professionalism and occupational closure: The management of tenure related disputes by the Federation of Women Teacher’s Associations of Ontario, 1918–1949. Gender and Education, 15 (1), 39-57.

4. Cavanagh, S.L. (2001). From a belief in biology as destiny to an environmental perspective of mental health: The impact of the Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene on education in Ontario, Canada, 1920-50. Change: Transformation in Education: A Journal of Theory, Research, Policy and Practice, 4 (1), 48-62.

3. Cavanagh, S.L. (2001). The pedagogy of the pastor: Social studies education in early twentieth century Canada. Canadian Journal of Education, 26 (4), 401–417.

2. Cavanagh, S.L. and Harper, H. (1999). Lady bountiful: The white woman teacher in multicultural education. Women’s Education/Education des Femmes, 23 (1), 94-99.

1. Cavanagh, S.L. (1998). The heterosexualization of the Ontario woman teacher in the post-war period. Canadian Women’s Studies/Les Cahiers de la Femme, 18 (1), 65–69.

Panel Discussions and Interviews Published in Journals (Reviewed)

Cavanagh, Sheila L., Camilla Bruun Eriksen, and Michael Nebeling. "The Psychic life of Gender. Introducing a psycho-soma-technical approach to gender." Kvinder, Køn & Forskning 20.1 (2020).

Sheila L. Cavanagh (2019) Queer Theory, Psychoanalysis, and the Symptom: A Lacanian Reading, Studies in Gender and Sexuality, 20:4, 226-230

Papers in Non-refereed Journals and Magazines

Cavanagh, S.L. (2014). Queer Tuvalet Hikâyeleri” Ankara’da anlatılacak. Kaos GL Magazine (Turkey), #135. Retrieved from kaosgl.org/sayfa.php?id=19285.

Cavanagh, S.L. (2019) Transgender Psychoanalysis: Lacan, Sex, and Sinthomes. In Public Seminar, The New School for Social Research. www.publicseminar.org/

2012 CWSA/ACEF Outstanding Scholarship Prize Honourable Mention for Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality, and the Hygienic Imagination.
2011 Patron’s Pick Award for the Queer Bathroom Monologues (a play written and produced by Sheila Cavanagh), staged at the Toronto Fringe Festival, July 6th–17th.
2011 Independent Book Publishing Professionals Group, GLBT Indie Book Award Finalist for Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality, and the Hygienic Imagination.
2008 Canadian Women’s Studies Association’ Book Award Honourable Mention for Sexing the Teacher: School Sex Scandals and Queer Pedagogies for their annual book award.

International Grants (Refereed)

2018–2021 Medicine Man: Media Assemblages of Medicalized Masculinity. Principal Investigator Karen Hvidtfeldt Madsen, Department for the Study Culture, University of Southern Denmark. Advisory Board Member: Sheila L. Cavanagh.

National Grants (Refereed)

2015–2018 Transgender and Performance Ethnography.
SSHRC Partnership Development Grant ($187,000) Nominating Principal Investigator: Sheila Cavanagh. Co-Principal Investigator: Laura Levin, and Greta Bauer. Partners: Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, EGALE, and the Centre for Feminist Research at York University.
2012–2014 Queer Bathroom Monologues.
SSHRC Dissemination Grant ($102,000) Principal Investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh.
2010–2013 Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality and the Hygienic Imagination.
SSHRC Aid to Scholarly Publications. Principal Investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh.
2008–2011 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students and Bullying in Highschool Bathrooms.
SSHRC Standard Research Grant. ($103,123) Principal Investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh.
2006 Sexing the Teacher: School Sex Scandals and Queer Pedagogies.
SSHRC Aid to Scholarly Publications ($30,000). Principal Investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh.
2004–2007 Female Sex Scandals and Professionalism as a Regulatory Ideal.
SSHRC Standard Research Grant ($78, 384). Principal Investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh.
2000–2003 The Woman Teacher in Twentieth-Century Ontario.
SSHRC Standard Research Grant. SSHRC Standard Research Grant ($222, 213). Principal Investigator: Rebecca Coulter. Co-investigator: Sheila L. Cavanagh, Helen Harper, Suzanne Majhanovich, Goli Rezai-Rashti and Aniko Varpalotai.

Editorial Board Member

  • Editorial board member of Studies in Gender and Sexuality journal (2019–present).
  • Editorial board member of Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society journal (2019–present)
  • Editorial board member of Somatechnics journal (2015–present).

Co-editor of Journals

2016 – 2018, Co-editor, Somatechnics, a multidisciplinary body studies journal published by Edinburgh University Press (EUP). EUP journals are part of the ALPSP Collections via ACCUCOMS’ Aggregagent. (ACCUCOMS is the leading independent provider of services to academic and professional publishers around the world. With its headquarters based in the Netherlands, the company operates in five continents, covering North America, Latin America, Europe, Middle East, North Africa, Turkey, India, South Korea, Taiwan and South East Asia.)

Professional and Clinical Certifications

Registered Clinical Sociologist (Oct. 2019), Association of Applied and Clinical Sociology, Sociotherapy specialization.

Professional Memberships,

Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (TICP) (Guest Membership).
Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA).
Association of Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS).
The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (CASP).

Membership in Academic Organizations

The Association for Psychosocial Studies (APS).
Sexuality Studies Association of Canada (SSA).
The Canadian Network for Psychoanalysis and Culture (CNPC).
The Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS).

Visiting Professorships, Writing Retreats and Residences

December–January 2015, Varuna: The National Writer’s House, Katoomba, Australia.
2008, The Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
2005, Canadian Studies Association Academic Exchange, Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Universidad del Rosario. Invited.

Clinical and Psychoanalytic Education

Candidate in the three-year Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program at the Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (TICP), 2020–2023.

Conferences Organized

2016 Annual meeting of the Sexuality Studies Association. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 29–31 May 2016. Calgary, AB (with the steering committee).
2014 international exhibition titled Medusa-Eurydice: Painting, drawing, video of Dr. Bracha L. Ettinger’s art-working in Toluca at the Universitario Leopoldo Flores (Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México) and at the Galeria Polivalente of the Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico. (with Dr. Karen Rodriguez).
2014 Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, University of Toronto, May 22–25, 2014 (Local Organizing Committee).
2013 “Sex Talk @ York University II”. Sponsored by the LA&PS Research Events and Outreach Fund, the Associate Vice-President Research of LA&PS, the Centre for Feminist Research, and the Sexuality Studies Program at York University, York University, May 1st, 2013.
2011 “Sexuation: Encountering Gender and Sexuality: A Symposium on Lacan, Trans Studies, and Queer Theory,” Sponsored by the Speaking of Lacan Psychoanalytic Group in Toronto, the Sexuality Studies Program, and the LA&PS Faculty at York University. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto. April 2nd, 2011.

Conference Sessions Organized

2008 Queer Spectacles (Two separate sessions). Canadian Sociological Association: Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 5 June, 2008. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia.

Lectures to Professional Organizations

Cavanagh, S.L. Transgender and Psychoanalysis. (Presenter and Discussant). Between Hours/Interdisciplinary Dialogues. Toronto, ON: Toronto Psychoanalytic Society, October 21, 2017.

Cavanagh, S.L. Tiresias and psychoanalysis after Oedipus: Bracha L. Ettinger and Jacques Lacan. SITE Conference on Transgender, Gender and Psychoanalysis. London, England: Freud Museum. [Dutch translation by Mileen Janssens submitted to Psychoanalytische Perspectieven. Universiteit Gent]. 11 March, 2017.


Jacqueline A Choiniere

Associate Professor

  •  | Health, Nursing and Environmental Studies Building, 319 |
  •    ext. 30010 |
  •    jacchoin@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile


Elaine Coburn

Associate Professor

(Honours) Sociology and Canadian Studies, the University of Toronto, (1997),
MA Sociology, Stanford (1998),
PhD Sociology, Stanford, (2002).

  •  | Office: Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), 6th floor Kaneff, |
  •    ext. 55915 |
  •    ecoburn@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile
Researchgate

Biography

I grew up in Toronto and completed my undergraduate degree (Honours) in Sociology and Canadian Studies at the University of Toronto in 1997. I then began my PhD studies at Stanford University, completed in 2002. Subsequently, I moved to France, where I was a post-doctoral scholar and then researcher at the Centre d’analyse et d’intervention sociologiques (CADIS) at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS). In addition, I taught at the American University of Paris.

In 2016, I moved back to Canada with my husband and three children to join the International Studies department at the Glendon Campus, cross-appointed to Sociology through the Faculty of Graduate Studies. In 2020, I became the Director of the Centre for Feminist Studies, York University, for a four-year term.

Outside of research, I am a life-long distance runner. I enjoy hiking with my spouse, children and my younger brother and his family, in and around Toronto—and generally, being outside in the changing seasons, watching the wildlife in the ravine system.

Research areas

My research is concerned with three major areas:

  • the contemporary production of unjust inequalities through global capitalism, ongoing colonialisms and world-wide patriarchy;
  • struggles against unjust inequalities and the capitalist, colonial, and patriarchal systems that produce them;
  • social theories informed by and informing these social justice struggles, especially Indigenous feminisms, socialist feminism, and anti-racist feminisms.

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on the following projects:

  • “femina economica” and the International Monetary Fund’s “gender turn”, concerned with the emergence of the contradictory figure of the economic woman in (some) IMF discourse and policy
  • The Emma LaRocque Reader: Selected Writings of a Metis Feminist, 1975-2020, bringing together 45 years of writing by a major intellectual from lands now claimed by Canada
  • Indigenous Philosophy: Being in Our Times (by invitation from Bloomsbury Press) about the critical insights that diverse Indigenous intellectuals bring to major questions of our times, including what and how we know, how we become in relations with others, and what our obligations are in our human and other-than human relationships
  • the Flying Heads of Settler Colonialism with Yann Allard-Tremblay (McGill University) about persist ideologies that, over centuries and today naturalize and legitimate settler colonialism
  • contemporary racial capitalism with Wesley Crichlow (Ontario Tech University), exploring how the international political economy continues to be shaped by what Cedric Robinson describes as the mutually constitutive relationships of racialized exploitation and capital accumulation

Graduate Supervision

I am available to supervise students concerned with unjust inequalities, struggles to combat them and theorizing that informs those struggles, especially Indigenous, feminist and anti-racist perspectives.

Graduate Students Supervised

I am on the PhD supervisory committee for:

Kaitlin Peters. The Ontario Federation of Labour and Coalition-Building Praxis:
Struggling Against the Exploitation of Unpaid Labour?

I was the co-supervisor for the MA Major Research Paper for:

Toby Anne Finlay. Between Feminist Psychoanalysis and Deleuze: Bisexuality and the Transgender Subject in Feminist Theory.”

Comprehensive Examination Committees:
2020. Keelin Griffin. Citizenship.

---- Keelin Griffin. Feminist Theory.

2019 Kaitlin Peters. Feminist Epistemologies and Methodologies.

2018–2019 Kaitlin Peters. Feminist Theory.

---- Giovanni Carranza. Racial Hierarchies in the Americas.

---- Beatrice Anane-Bediakoh. Contemporary Social Theory: Blackness and Resistance.

2017–2018
Dean Ray. Indigenous Theories of Indigenous Identities.

2017
Sonia D’Angelo. Qualitative Methods.

Courses Taught

Soci 6200: Topics in Contemporary Sociology: African, Judaic and Indigenous Philosophies

Books

2015 Coburn, Elaine. ‘More Will Sing Their Way to Freedom’: Indigenous Resistance and Resurgence. Foreword by Emma LaRocque. Halifax: Fernwood Press. Pp.264.
fernwoodpublishing.ca

Refereed Journal Articles

Special Issues
2017 Coburn, Elaine. Defaire et refaire le sexe, le genre, la sexualité: le sujet intersexe, trans et queer. Socio. Vol. 9. Pp.237

2012 Coburn, Elaine. The Political Philosophy of GA Cohen. Socialist Studies/ Etudes Socialistes. Vol.8, No.1. Pp. 320.

Select Articles
2019 Coburn, Elaine. “Trickle-Down Gender at the International Monetary Fund: The Contradictions of Femina Economica in Global Capitalist Governance”. The International Feminist Journal of Politics. 21(5): 768-788. DOI: 10.1080/14616742.2019.1607764

2017 Coburn, Elaine. “Against the Grain: Sociology from the Standpoint of Roxana Ng.” Social Justice Studies. Vol. 11, No. 1. Pp.136-159.

2016 Coburn, Elaine. “Theorizing Colonial Capitalism and Indigenous Liberation: Contemporary Indigenous Scholarship from Lands Claimed by Canada.” Studies in Political Economy. Vol. 97, No. 3. Pp. 285-307.

2013 Coburn Elaine, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, George Sefa Dei and Makere Stewart-Harawira. “‘Unspeakable Things’: Indigenous Research and Social Science”: Socio. No. 2. Pp. 331-347.

Chapters in Books

2020. Gina Starblanket and Elaine Coburn. “This Country has Another Story”: Indigenous Women’s Scholarship and Agency on Turtle Island.” Edited by Heather Whiteside. Canadian Political Economy: Changes, Crises, Conflict. University of Toronto Press. Pp.86-102.

2017. Carroll, William K. and Elaine Coburn. “Counterhegemonic and Cognitive Practice in Transnational Alternative Policy Groups”. Think Tanks: Key Spaces in the Global Production of Power. Edited by Alexandra Sallas-Porras and Georgina Murray. Palgrave Macmillan. Pp.187-217.

2016. Coburn, Elaine and Clifford (Kam'ayaam/Chachim'multhnii) Atleo. “Not Just Another Social Movement: Indigenous Resistance and Resurgence.” A World to Win. Edited by William K. Carroll and Kanchan Sarker. Winnipeg: Arbeiter Ring Press. Pp. 176-195.

2011. Coburn, Elaine. “Resisting Neoliberal Capitalism: Insights from Political Economy.” Relations of Global Power: Neoliberal Order and Disorder. Edited by Stephen McBride and Gary Teeple. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Pp.194-226.

Other Publications

Review Essays
2020. Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Darryl R. J. Leroux’s Distorted Descent: White Claims to Indigenous Identity. Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture. 5000 words. DOI: 10.1080/13504630.2020.1770585

2016 Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Glen Coulthard’s Red Skin, White Mask: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition. Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory. Vol. 63, No. 148:72-85. 4000 words.

---- Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Abigail Bakan and Enakshi Dua’s Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theories. Canadian Review of Sociology. 53 (2). Pp. 253-263. 4000 words.

---- Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Colin Barker, Laurence Cox, John Krinsky and Alf Gunvald Nilsen. Marxism and Social Movements. Socialist Studies/Etudes Socialistes. Vol.11, No.1. Pp. 237-250. 4000 words.

2015 Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Maggie Walter and Chris Andersen’s Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Research Methodology. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and S2014

---- Coburn, Elaine. Review essay of Achille Mbembe’s Critique de la raison nègre. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society. Vol. 3, No.2. Pp. 176-186. 4000 words.
Reprinted January 28, 2015. African Studies Association. http://www.africanstudies.org/blog
Society. Vol. 4 (2). Pp. 123-133. 4000 words.

I am on the editorial boards of the Canadian Review of Sociology and global-e, a twice-weekly social science open-access journal on topical concerns.

Previously, I was on the editorial board of the French language journal Socio, based at the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme in Paris, France. For five years, I was the editor of the peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal, Socialist Studies/Etudes Socialistes. Towards the end of my tenure as editor, Cheryl LaGuardia, librarian at Harvard University’s Widener Library wrote that “Libraries serving Canadian and socialist scholars should be knowledgeable about this title.”

I have reviewed for more than twenty scholarly journals, including the American Indian Quarterly, the American Journal of Sociology, the Canadian Journal of Native Studies, the Canadian Review of Political Science, the Canadian Review of Sociology, Current Sociology, the International Feminist Journal of Politics, Qualitative Inquiry, and Studies in Political Economy.

With my colleague, Professor Wesley Crichlow, I have co-edited two symposia on topical concerns, “Sociology and Black Liberation” in the Canadian Review of Sociology and “Black Humanity: Bearing Witness to COVID-19“ in Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography, both in 2020.

Other publications for more general audiences include a chapter for the Transnational Institute on “Economics as Ideology: Challenging Expert Political Power” in their publication State of Power 2016, and for the United Nations Educational, Science and Cultural Organizations (UNESCO) “Taking Space and Making Space: Feminist Leadership Beyond the ‘Honorary Man’” in The Time is Now: Feminist Leaderships in a New Era/ La hora del liderazgo feminista, published in 2019.


Tania Das Gupta

Professor

BA Sociology, University of Toronto, (1979),
MA Sociology, University of Toronto, (1981),
PhD Sociology, University of Toronto, (1987).

Home Unit: School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies

Faculty Profile

Although I am trained as a sociologist from the University of Toronto, having done my graduate studies at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, my research and writing are interdisciplinary, bringing together Gender and Women’s Studies, Anti-racism Studies and Marxist Studies. In short, I have an intersectional approach. Currently, I am located in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies. I also have a background in paid and unpaid community activism, having worked for many years with immigrant and immigrant women’s groups and anti-racism organizations, particularly in my formative years as a graduate student in Toronto. Perhaps due to that and my own positionality as a one and-a-half generation racialized immigrant youth in Toronto in the 1980’s, my scholarship and activism are connected, characterising my research and teaching that has remained to this day. I was hired by York University in 1991 in a position that mainly focused around anti-racism research and practice. I was also appointed to the Sociology Graduate Program from that time onwards.

I have also been appointed for two years (August 2020-June 2022) as Affirmative Action, Equity and Inclusivity Officer at York University. In this role, I co-facilitate workshops for colleagues on Hiring Committees, act as a resource person in committees and meetings and also have the task of reviewing the Affirmative Action Program in the York University Faculty Association (YUFA) Collective Agreement (2018–2021).

Research areas

South Asian diaspora and transnationalism, immigration and refugee issues, women, work and families, race and racism in the workplace and in other social contexts, anti-racism, state policies, and community activism.

Current Research Activities

I have recently concluded an exploratory research project on twice migrated Gulf South Asians in Toronto, Ontario and their experiences in the labour market, with racism and Islamophobia and their transnational lives. This project was based on in-depth interviews and some ethnographic research. A book is being published titled Twice Migrated, Twice Displaced: Gulf-Indian and Gulf-Pakistani Professionals and Transnational Households in Canada, 2004–2014 (UBC Press, projected for Fall catalogue 2021). Over the last many years, while I was doing the research and writing for this book, I made several conference presentations and also have a few smaller publications:

  1. Gulf Husbands and Canadian Wives In the South Asian Community: Transnationalism From Below – A Classed, Gendered and Racialized Phenomenon in Man, Guida and R. Cohen, eds. 2015. Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work and Identities. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2015, 17-32.
  2. Twice Migrated: Political Economy of South Asian Immigrants From the Middle East to Canada, International Journal of the Humanities, Vol. 3, Issue 9, 2005-06 [www.Humanities-Journal.com], p. 263-274
  3. Twice Migrated Gulf South Asians in Canada, 17th Annual Online IMISCOE (International Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion in Europe) Conference, July 1, 2020.
  4. Twice Migrated South Asians in Canada, Canadian Sociological Association (CSA), University of B.C., Vancouver, June 4, 2019.
  5. Twice Migrated South Asian Households and Transnational Living, 25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) Conference, Oct. 12, 2018, Banff, Alberta.
  6. Twice Migrated South Asians in Canada, Multinational Migration: Onward Migration Patterns and Possibilities in Asia and Beyond, Asia Research Inst. and Yale Centre for the Study of Race, Indigeneity and Transnational Migration, September 27, 2018.

Second, I have been involved as a Co-Investigator in two SSHRC-funded research partnerships, including as Co-Investigator, Standard Research Grant (SSHRC) titled ‘Professional Immigrant Women Navigating the Canadian Labour market: A Study in Adult Learning,’ (PI: Dr. Roxana Ng, University of Toronto), October 2005 ($110,091) and Co-Investigator, Standard Research Grant (SSHRC) titled “Transnational Migration Trajectories of Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada,”( PI: Dr. Guida Man, York University), April 2009 ($100,488). Two contributions out of these engagements are:

  1. Tania Das Gupta, Guida Man, Kiran Mirchandani, Roxana Ng, “Class Borders: Chinese and South Asian Canadian Professional Women Navigating the Labour Market,” Journal of Pacific Migration Review, Volume 23, No. 1, 2014, p.55-83.
  2. Srabani Maitra, Tania Das Gupta, Heejoo Yoon, Journey to Find Myself Again: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women in the Labour Market, 2013. (documentary film available in Scott Library).

Third, in partnership with Punjabi Community Health Services (PCHS) and Co-Investigator, Sugandha Nagpal (India), a project titled Punjabi Community and COVID-19 will identify the new and shifting needs, obstacles, concerns and strategies around immigration and settlement among young newcomer Punjabis (aged 18-35) in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) as a result of COVID-19. This project will use a transnational lens and will be based on participatory research methods, interviews and autoethnographies.

Selected Research Grants

  • PI, SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant (PEG), Punjabi Migrants and Covid-19 in Canada, 2021, $23,886 (with Sugandha Nagpal in India).
  • PI, York Centre for Asian Research Collaboration Fellowship (with Dr. Sugandha Nagpal, India) to focus on the impact of COVID-19 on Punjabi migration, 2020-21, $4,000
  • PI, 2014-2015 LA & PS International Collaboration Grant, “Woman and Man Alone: A Comparative Study of Split Families in India and Canada,” $5,000
  • PI, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Minor Research Grants, “Split Families” Among South Asian Families in Canada, February 2013, $4,000
  • CI, Standard Research Grant (SSHRC) titled “Transnational Migration Trajectories of Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada,” PI: Dr. Guida Man, York University, April 2009 ($100,488)

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the areas of racialization and racism, South Asian migration and diaspora, immigrant and racialized women.

Graduate Students Supervised

Master's
Kimberley Palmer, MA, completed 2006, Title: Garifuna Frontier Navigation: Two Centuries of Relocation and Resistance

Roanna Persaud, MA completed 2006, Title: Ontario’s Experience with Employment Equity Policy: Interrogating Legislated Employment Equity Initiatives and the Emergence of the ‘Managing Diversity Model.’

Danielle Gillis, MA completed in 2007, Title: White Ice, White Canada: Examining Men's Professional Hockey as an Example of Colonial Multiculturalism (Nominated for MA Thesis Prize)

Nishani Wickramasinghe, MA completed, 2008

Mohammad Sidky, MA completed 2009. Title: Precariously Employed Immigrants: Ethno-Racial Filtering Through the Devaluaton of Internationally Obtained Credentials.

Sugandha Nagpal, MA completed, 2010. Title: Exploring Explanations for Sex-Selection in Indo-Canadian Communities

Khalida Ramyar, MA completed 2015. Afghanistan before the Invasions: The Subversion of Democracy in 1973

Adela Ludin, MA completed 2013. Title: Beyond a Violence Against Women Approach: Understanding Violence Against Women in Afghanistan

Jonathan Zissakos, MA completed 2013. Title: The Allure of Ethno-Nationalism: Analyzing Genocide Justification in Rwanda.

Betty Ann Henry, MA completed 2015. Title: Stepping Out of Place: The Socio-Economic Marginalisation of Fat Black Women (fBw) and its Relevance for Contemporary Labour Practices.

Rubina, Karyar, MA completed 2013. Title: Historical materialism, biopolitical abandonment, total institutions and intersectionality: a Marxist Feminist critique of homeless women’s shelters in Canada from homeless women’s perspectives.

Alina Budhwani, MA completed 2019 Patterns of violence: How gender considerations shape conceptions of intimate partner violence (IPV)

PhD
Betty Ann Henry, ongoing.

Tomoko Mizuguchi, PhD in progress, withdrawn, 2017.

Tara Atluri, PhD completed, 2008. Title: Off Colour Jokes: The Ambivalence of Race Based Humour.

Lina Samuel, PhD completed, 2008. Title: Disruption, Displacement, Ambivalence: The Making of Migrant Identities Among Women in the Keralite Diaspora, nominated for Sociology Dissertation Prize.

Madelina Sunseri, PhD. Completed, 2006, Title: Theorizing Nationalisms: Intersections of Gender, Nation, Culture and Colonialism in the Case of Oneida’s Decolonizing Nationalist Movement. (Winner of Sociology Dissertation prize and winner of Mary McEwan PhD dissertation award)

Courses Taught

Race and Ethnic Relations SOCI6760.06, 2004-05 (Co-taught with Ester Reiter), 2005, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012 (Title changed to ‘Race and Ethnicity’), Winter 2018, Fall 2019
The Family (name changed to Families Today SOCI6840 6.0), 1999, 2000 (co-taught with L. Davids)
Intimate Relations (SOCI6540.03B), Winter 1998
Class, Politics and Society: Racism and Sexism in Capitalist Labour Process ( SOCI 6790.03F, course creator), Fall 1993.
SOCI 6680 3.0M Selected Topics in Work and Occupations: Racism and Sexism at Work (course creator), Winter 2019.
Directed Reading Course (SOCI6900.06 and SOCI6900.03), 1991,1993, 1995, 2003, 2004

Books

Twice Migrated, Twice Displaced: Gulf-Indian and Gulf-Pakistani Professionals and Transnational Households in Canada, 2004–2014 (UBC Press, projected for Fall catalogue 2021).

Racism and Paid Work (Toronto: Garamond Press, 1996), 130 pages, ISBN 1-55193-000-5.

Real Nurses and Others: Racism in Nursing. (Halifax: Fernwood Press, 2009),127 pages, ISBN978-1-55266-298-4

Learning From Our History: Community Development by Immigrant Women in Ontario, 1958–86, A Tool For Action (Toronto: Cross Cultural Communication Centre, 1986), 105 pages , ISBN 0-9691060-7-6.

Edited Books

Lead editor (with Carl James, Chris Andersen, Grace Edwards Galabuzi, Roger Maaka), Race and Racialization: Essential Readings. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2018 (second edition), 713 pages. (ISBN 978-1-77338-015-5)

Lead editor (with Carl James, Grace Edwards Galabuzi et al), Race and Racialization: Essential Readings. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2007, 416 pages (ISBN 978-1-55130-335-2)

Co-editor (with Jesse Vorst, Roxana Ng, et al), Race, Class, Gender: Bonds and Barriers, (Winnipeg: Between the Lines, 1989), 260 pages (ISBN 0-921284-26-8).

Chapters in Books

*”Indian Women and Work in the Diaspora,” Handbook on Indian Diaspora Eds. Radha Hegde and Ajaya Sahoo. New York: Routledge, 2017.

“Restructuring, Resistance and Knowledge Production on Campus: The story of the Department of Equity Studies at York University” in Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader edited by Nada Elia, et al. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016, p. 90-202.

“Journey to Consciousness,” in Resilience and Triumph: Immigrant women tell their stories edited by Rashmi Luther, et al. Toronto: Second Story Press, 2015, p.245-249.

*“Gulf Husbands and Canadian Wives In the South Asian Community: Transnationalism From Below – A Classed, Gendered and Racialized Phenomenon,” in Man, Guida & R. Cohen, eds. 2015. Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work and Identities. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2015, 17-32.

*”Migration, Trauma and Work,” in Roots and Routes of Displacement Trauma: From Analysis to Advocacy and Policy to Practice, Eds. Soheila Pashang and Sheila Gruner. Toronto: Rock Mills Press, 2014.

*“Race and Migration,” in Immanuel Nesse, et al. Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, p.2483-2491.

“Racism/Anti-Racism, Precarious Employment and Unions” in Daily Struggles—the Deepening Racialization and Feminization of Poverty in Canada edited by Maria Wallis and Siu-ming Kwok. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2008, p. 143-157. (Reprint)

“Racism/Anti-Racism, Precarious Employment and Unions” in Tania Das Gupta, Carl James, Grace Edwards Galabuzi et al), Race and Racialization: Essential Readings. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2007, p. 350-355 (Reprint)

Co-authored with Rebecca Hagey and Jane Turritin, “Racial Discrimination in Nursing” in Interrogating Race and Racism, Vijay Agnew, eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007, p.261-301.

“Immigrant Women’s Activism: The Last Thirty Years,” in Race, Racialization, and Antiracism in Canada and Beyond, Genevieve Fuji Johnson and Randy Enomoto, eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007, p.105-116.

*“Racism and the Labour Movement” in Equalizing Labour: Union Responses to Equity in Canada edited by Gerald Hunt and David Rayside. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007, p. 235-277.

Co-authored with Cynthia Cranford and Leah F. Vosko, “Thinking Through Community Unionism” in Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada edited by Leah F. Vosko. Canada: McGill Queen’s University Press, 2006, p. 353-377

“Racism/Anti-Racism, Precarious Employment and Unions” in Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada edited by Leah F. Vosko. Canada: McGill Queen’s University Press, 2006, p. 318-334.

“Families of Native Peoples, Immigrants and People of Colour” in Open Boundaries: A Canadian Women’s Studies Reader edited by B. Crow and L. Gotell. Toronto Prentice-Hall, 2005, p. 199-216. (Reprint)

“Racism in Nursing,” in Women At the Margins: Is Anyone Listening? edited by Merle Jacobs (Toronto: Women’s Press, 2002), p.117-137. (Reprint)

*“Families of Native Peoples, Immigrants and People of Colour,” in Canadian Families: Diversity, Conflict & Change edited by Nancy Mandell and Ann Duffy (Toronto: Harcourt Brace, 2000), p.146-187.

“Multiculturalism Policy: Terrain of Struggle For Immigrant Women”, in Canadian Woman Studies: An Introductory Reader edited by Nuzhat Amin, Frances Beer, Kathryn McPherson, Andrea Medovarski, Angela Miles, Goli Rezai-Rashti (Canada: Inanna Publications and Education Inc., 1999), p. 166-171.

*"The Politics of Multiculturalism: "Immigrant Women" and the Canadian State," in Scratching the Surface: Canadian Anti-Racist Feminist Thought edited by Enakshi Dua and Angela Robertson (Toronto: Women's Press, 1999), p. 187-205

*"Anti-Racism and the Organized Labour Movement," in Racism and Social Inequality in Canada, ed. Vic Satzewich, (Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing, 1998), p. 315-334.

"Towards An Anti-Racist, Feminist Teaching Method," in Feminism and Education: A Canadian Perspective,/em>, Vol. 2, (Toronto: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 1994), p. 17-42.

"Introducing Race, Class and Gender: Towards an Anti-Racist, Working Class Feminist Movement," in Race, Class, Gender: Bonds and Barriers. (Winnipeg: Between the Lines, 1989), p. 1-9.

Refereed Journal Articles

Special journal issues:
Guest co-editor (with Soma Chatterjee) of special issue on Indigenous self-determination in a ‘chronically mobile’ world: Critical perspectives from anti-racist scholars of migration and mobility, in Studies in Social Justice, Vol. 14, No. 2 (2020)
Link: journals.library.brocku.ca/index.php/SSJ/issue/current

Guest editor (with Franca Iacovetta) of issue on 'Whose Canada Is It?’ with Atlantis, Volume 24.2, Spring/Summer, 2000, 168 pages.

Co-editor (with Vijay Agnew, Maroussia Hajdukowski-Ahmad, Jacinthe Michaud), “Restructuring and Women’s Work,” Resources for Feminist Research, Vol. 27, Nos.3/4, 2000, 217 pages.

Guest editor (with Pat Bradshaw, Jo-Ann Hannah, Carmen Henry, Milana Todoroff), 'Women and Work' with Canadian Woman Studies, Vol. 18, No.1, Spring 1998, 152 pages.

Soma Chatterjee and Tania Das Gupta, “On Migration and Indigenous Sovereignty in a Chronically Mobile World,” Studies in Social Justice, Volume 14, No. 2 (2020): 246-267. https://journals.library.brocku.ca/index.php/SSJ/issue/view/126

“Are You a Bengali Or Are you an Indian? Bengalis in Canada,” Alternate Routes 31(1), 2019, Retrieved from http://www.alternateroutes.ca/index.php/ar/article/view/22467

Tania Das Gupta, Guida Man, Kiran Mirchandani, Roxana Ng, “Class Borders: Chinese and South Asian Canadian Professional Women Navigating the Labour Market,” Journal of Pacific Migration Review, Volume 23, No. 1, 2014, p.55-83.

Pramila Aggarwal and Tania Das Gupta, “Grandmothering at work: Conversations with Sikh Punjabi Grandmothers in Toronto,” South Asian Diaspora, special issue, Vol. V, no. 1, 2013, p.77-90.

“The Challenges of a ‘Multicultural’ Classroom: Some Reflections,” Atlantis: A Woman’s Studies Journal, Vol. 35.2 , 2012, p.118-127.

“Twice Migrated: Political Economy of South Asian Immigrants From the Middle East to Canada,” International Journal of the Humanities, Vol. 3, Issue 9, 2005-06 [www.Humanities-Journal.com], p. 263-274

“Teaching Anti-Racist Research in the Academy,” Teaching Sociology, Vol. 31, No. 4 October 2003, p.456-468.

with Franca Iacovetta “Introduction to “Whose Canada Is It? Immigrant Women, Women of Colour and Feminist Critiques of ‘Multiculturalism’,” in Atlantis, Vol. 24.2 Spring/Summer 2000, p. 1-4.

"Anti-Black Racism in Nursing in Ontario," in Studies in Political Economy, (Fall, 1996), p. 97-116.

"Multiculturalism Policy: Terrain of Struggle for Immigrant Women," in Canadian Woman Studies, (1994), Vol. 14, no. 2, p. 72-75.

"Political Economy of Gender, Race & Class: Looking at South Asian Immigrant Women in Canada," in Canadian Ethnic Studies, (1994), Vol. XXVI, no. 1, p. 59-73.

"Towards An Anti-Racist, Feminist Teaching Method," in New Horizons in Adult Education, (1993), April, p. 33-50.

"Involving Immigrant Women: A Case of Participatory Research," in Canadian Women's Studies, (1987), Vol. 8, no. 2, p. 14-16.

"Unravelling the Web," in Resources for Feminist Research, (1987), Vol. 16, no. 1, March, p. 13-14.

"Looking Under the Mosaic: South Asian Immigrant Women," in Polyphony, (1986), Vol. 8, nos. 1-2, p. 67-69.

with Roxana Ng, "Nation-builders? The Captive Labour Force of Non-English Speaking Immigrant Women," Canadian Women's Studies, (1981), Vol. 3, no. 1, p. 83-85.

Winner of 2015-16 Dean's Award for Excellence in Teaching for Full-Time faculty in the Faculty of LA & PS
Research Development Fellowship, YUFA, 2015-16
Seneca College Social Services Worker Program (Immigrant & Refugee) award for dedication towards improving the lives of displaced persons, racialized individuals and communities, and immigrants and refugees, 2015.
Research Release Award, LA & PS, 2013-14, 2018-19.
Research Development Fellowship, YUFA, 2009-10
Academic Activist Award, May Day and South Asian Heritage Month Celebrations, 2009
York University Merit Award, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2006, 2001
Atkinson College Alumni Association Teaching Award, 1997
Ontario Graduate Scholarship, 1983

Technical reports
“Some Effects on Nurses of Race, Colour or Ethnicity: Summary of Das Gupta’s Survey of Nurses, November 2001-May 2002,” Implementing Accountability for Equity and Ending Racial Backlash in Nursing, Centre for Equity in Health and Society, Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Toronto, April 2005.

“Report of the SSHRC Research Cluster on Refugees and Forced Migration: A Cross Sector Research Agenda for the Protection of Refugees and Forced Migrants, Co-authored with Susan McGrath, Tracey Derwing, Jean Renaud and Sharryn Aiken, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University, 2005. http://www.yorku.ca/crs/Research/refugeeresearchreport.pdf

*“Racism in Nursing,” Ontario Nurses’ Association, 2003, 150 pages (additional Executive Report of 19) pages. The full report was the basis of a book by Fernwood Press titled Real Nurses and Others.

*"Analytical Report on Ontario Nurses Association (ONA) vs. Hotel Dieu," ONA, 1995, 75 pages.

*"Analytical Report on the Human Rights Case Involving Northwestern General Hospital," Ontario Human Rights Commission, 1994, 82 pages.

Selected professional activities
Anonymous assessment of T & P file:
Full Professor file at Carleton University
Tenure and promotion file, University of Ottawa
Tenure and promotion file, University of Windsor
Tenure and promotion file, University of Toronto

External/Internal PhD Examiner
Fiona Sookhai, Adult Education and Counselling, OISE, University of Toronto, 2021
Raj Kumar Khadkar, PhD, UBC, School of Social Work, May 2020
Anh Ngo, PhD oral exam, School of Social Work, York University, June 10, 2019.
Andrea Monteiro, PhD oral exam, School of Nursing, University of Victoria, April 20, 2018.
Roula Kteily-Hawa, PhD oral exam, University of Toronto, Dec. 3, 2012.
Michael Ma in Social and Political Thought, York University, Aug. 28, 2007.
Archana Sharma, Sociology and Equity Studies, OISE, University of Toronto, May 15, 2006.
Sharon Sandhu, Faculty of Education, Oct. 31, 2005

Anonymous article review
Studies in Social Justice, August 5, 2020.
Transnational Social Review, May, 2017
Canadian Ethnic Studies Review, January, 2017
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research (CJNR), January 2012.
Gender and Society, July 2008.

Member of International Editorial Board of journal Migration and Development (Routledge), 2017–

Selected non-refereed publications
“Inquiry into coronavirus nursing home deaths needs to include discussion of workers and race.” The Conversation, May 25, 2020.
theconversation.com

“Canadian Multiculturalism and Inclusion,” Fedcan Equity Matters Blog, Friday (4 March 2011). blog.fedcan.ca.


Deborah Davidson

Associate Professor

B.A., Sociology, York University, (1996),
M.A., Sociology, York University, (1998),
Ph.D., Sociology, York University, (2008).

Faculty Profile
thetattooproject.info

My introduction to sociology came many years ago, in my first round of post-secondary education at SUNY, Buffalo, when I met with Kai Erikson’s Wayward Puritans, as I was encouraged to think differently about deviance. Fast forward many more years after a long hiatus from university, I completed my undergraduate degree at York and went on, and on, eventually to a tenured position. I have been very fortunate, along the way, to have been mentored and supported by colleagues in Canada and the UK. As a sociologist I am never bored, and as a sociologist I love teaching!

Using an auto/biographical approach, my research began in the area of perinatal loss and how hospital protocols to recognize and acknowledge grief in women experiencing death during the perinatal period emerged in hospitals. This research extended my interest in grief and bereavement more broadly and The Tattoo Project was born when I began research on tattoos used for purposes of memorialization and, from that, commemoration more generally.

I consider myself a feminist, qualitative, micro-meso life course sociologist, as my research interests span from birth to death, and involve mainly individuals, smaller groups, and social institutions. Within this paradigm, I also do research in critical disability studies. Some of my research is interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary.

Research areas

Life course: pregnancy and birth, grief, bereavement, memorialization and commemoration; gender; qualitative methodology; critical disability studies

Current Research Activities

My Tattoo Project research has morphed and branched. Having recently completed one collaborative SSHRC funded project on tattoos for memorialization, I am working on another collaborative SSHRC funded project on tattoos for healing. Relatedly, along with a sociology graduate student we are writing about tattoos after sexual violence. While a York-Seneca Commemorates Tattoo Project has is on hold due to pandemic restrictions, I am conducting a smaller related project with York-Seneca participants. My goal for the York-Seneca Commemorates Tattoo Project, while working with a portrait photographer at Seneca@York, is to curate an exhibit based on the project. The exhibit is intended to be in honour of “Canada’s coolest poet”, deceased York Professor Priscila Uppal, who was involved in the earliest stages of The Tattoo Project and who contributed an original poem to The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive (Davidson, Ed, 2017).

As well, I continue to work with the Faculty of Health’s Associate Professor Nazilla Khanlou, Echo's OWHC Chair in Women's Mental Health Research on interdisciplinary SSHRC and CIHR funded projects.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020, SSHRC, Insight Grant, Healing Tattoos. $88,000 (Co-applicant)
  • 2019, (extended due to Covid-19) SSHRC Insight Development Grant, Arts-based participatory research approach: Potential for exploring Asian-Canadian youth identities through an intersectionality lens, 47,971 (Co-applicant)
  • 2020, SSHRC, COVID19 Supplement, for: Arts-based participatory research approach: Potential for exploring Asian-Canadian youth identities through an intersectionality lens, $7,615 (Co-applicant)
  • 2019, LA&PS Minor Research Grant, The Tattoo Project, Photographing Memory: A York-Seneca Collaboration, $3,000 (PI)
  • 2018, The $15K Challenge Application for Project Funding, Women’s College Hospital Women’s Xchange, Mothering at the margins: Towards an equity-based health promotion framework for racialized mothers of children with disabilities. $15,000 (Co-applicant)
  • 2017, SSHRC, Insight Development Grant, Memorial Tattoos: Inking the Bond, $71,093 (Co-applicant)
  • 2013, SSHRC, Small Research Grant, A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos: Developing a Prototype. $3,500 (PI)
  • 2013, York University Faculty Association Teaching-Learning Development Grant, Engaging Sociology: Enhancing the Experience of Students in AP/SOCI 1010 6.00, Introduction to Sociology, $4000 (PI)
  • 2012, CIHR, Café Scientifique, Mothers speak up! On parenting children with disabilities: Implications for mom’s wellbeing and social support. $3000 (Co-applicant)
  • 2011, Faculty of Health, York University Social Support of Immigrant Mothers of Children with Disabilities, start-up funding (Co-Investigator)
  • 2011, British Academy, eGAP2, Use of the Internet and Griefwork in Perinatal Loss. £7495 (Co-PI)
  • 2010, Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Minor Research Grant, Embodied Grief and Tattoos as Memorialization: Comparisons Among Types of Losses. $4000 (PI)
  • 2010, Plymouth University, An exploration of Mother/Daughter Relationships during Pregnancy and the Transition to Motherhood of Women with Pre-Existing Diabetes – view from the professionals UK and Canada. £5000 (Co-investigator)
  • 2004, York University Faculty of Arts Research Grant, Challenging Practices in the University Classroom: Implementing and Evaluating Constructive Teaching/Learning Strategies. $4997 (Co-investigator)
  • 2004, Social Science and Humanities Research Council Small Research Grant, Challenging Practices in the University Classroom: Implementing and Evaluating Constructive Teaching/Learning Strategies. $3100 (Collaborator)
  • 1999, National Network on Environments and Women’s Health, Women’s Health: An Impact Assessment of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy, $23,500 (Co-investogator)

I am accepting new students for supervision in areas related to gender, life course, disability, and qualitative methodology. As a teacher, I mentor, support, collaborate, and encourage intellectual risk-taking.

Graduate Students Supervised

  • Ameera Ali, 2020, Reproducing and Resisting the Binary: Discursive Conceptualizations of Gender Variance in Children's Literature. (PhD, Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies)
  • Samantha Teichman, 2020, The New Mourning Routine: Online Mourning and Ritual Practices in the Digital Age (MA, Sociology)
  • Emily Gillespie, 2014 (MA, Critical Disability Studies)
  • Jordana Reinstein, 2013, (MA, Sociology)
  • Nili Pervan, 2020 (MA, Graduate Program in Interdisciplinary Studies)
  • Thrmiga Sathiyamoorthy, 2018 (MA, Graduate Program in Interdisciplinary Studies)
  • Joycelyn Afrifa, 2014, Policy [In] Action: Egg Donation-A Detriment to Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Women? (MA, School of Health Policy and Management)
  • Maryam El'Bably, 2013, Surrogacy and Social Processes: A Policy Analysis (MA Sociology).
  • Hannah Banfield, 2011, The Over-prescription of Psychotropic Drugs to Women (MA, Women’s Studies)

Courses Taught

GS SOCI 6090 3.0 Selected Topics in Empirical Methods: Visual Research Methods
GS EDUC 5720 3.0 Disability in Society
SOCI 5900 3.0 Directed Reading
GS SOCI 6900 3.0 Directed Reading
GS WMST 6801 3.0 Directed Reading
INTERDIS 5000 3.0 Reading Course

Books

The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive (Davidson, Ed, 2017). www.canadianscholars.ca/books/the-tattoo-project

Select Refereed Journal Articles

Susan C., Lambert, M. R., Davidson, D., Greco, C & Macdonald, M. E. (2020) Memorial tattoos: Advancing continuing bonds theory, Death Studies, DOI: 10.1080/07481187.2020.1716888

Davidson, D. (2019). Sibling Loss—Disenfranchised Grief and Forgotten Mourners. Bereavement Care 37(3): 124-130.

Davidson, D. & Letherby, G. (2019). Use of the Internet and Griefwork in Perinatal Loss: motivations, methodologies and meaning making. Women’s Studies International Forum 74 52-58. 10.1016/j.wsif.2019.02.004

Cadell, S., Lambert, M. R. Macdonald, M. E., Davidson, D. O’Gorman, M. & Baljko, M. (2018). ‘The Pain of the Tattoo Was a Relief': Advancing a Theory of Embodied Pain in a Study of Memorial Tattoos. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 56(6): e31.

Vazquez, L. M., Khanlou, N., Davidson, D. & Aidarus, F. (2018). Strategies to Promote the Inclusion of Young Adults With Developmental Disabilities in Community-Based Health Studies. Qualitative Health Research 1–14 10.1177/1049732318808249

Davidson, D. (2018). The Need for Bereavement Support Following Perinatal Loss. Bereavement Care 37(1): 31-34.

Davidson, D. (2017). Art embodied: tattoos as memorials. Bereavement Care 36(1): 33-40.

Khanlou, N, Mustafa, N. Vazquez, L. M., Davidson, D. & Yoshida, K. (2017). Mothering children with developmental disabilities: A critical perspective on health promotion. Health Care for Women International 38(66): 613-634.

Brown, G., Davidson, D., Harvey, J. & Letherby, G. (2015). HE(R)tales: Reflections on Some Auto/biographical Inter/multi-connections in Academia. Auto/Biography Yearbook. British Sociological Association. Auto/Biography Study Group.

Davidson, D. & Letherby, G. (2015). Editorial Introduction Special Edition: Loss, Bereavement, and Creativity. Illness, Crisis & Loss 23(4): 289–290.

Letherby, G. & Davidson, D. (2015). Embodied Storytelling: Loss and Bereavement, Creative Practices, and Support. Special Edition Illness, Crisis & Loss 23(4): 343-360.

Davidson, D. & Letherby, G. (2014). Griefwork Online: Perinatal Loss, Lifecourse Disruption and Online Support. Human Fertility 3: 214-217.

Davidson, D. (2011). Reflections on Doing Research Grounded in My Experience of Perinatal Loss: From Auto/biography to Autoethnography. Sociological Research Online, (1) www.socresonline.org.uk/16/1/6.html.

Davidson, D. & Stahls, H. (2010). Maternal Grief: Creating an Environment for Dialogue. Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement 1(2): 16-25.

Davidson, D. (2008). A Technology of Care: Caregiver Response to Perinatal Loss. Women’s Studies International Forum, Special Edition, Women and Technologies of Reproduction 31(4): 278-284.

Davidson, D. & Langan, D. (2006). The Breastfeeding Incident: Teaching and Learning Through Transgression. Studies in Higher Education 31(4): 439-452.

Langan, D. & Davidson, D. (2005). Critical Pedagogy and Personal Struggles: Feminist Scholarship Outside Women’s Studies. Feminist Teacher 15(2): 132-158.

Fontaine, P., Letherby, G. & Whatley (Davidson), D. (1998). Mothers, Daughters, and Others: Some Personal Reflections on Mothers and Daughters. Canadian Woman Studies 18 (2&3): 112-114.

Chapters in Books

Davidson, D. & Khanlou, N. (2017). Families Experiencing Disability, in Amber Gazso and Karen Kobayashi (eds.) Continuity and Innovation: Canadian Families in the New Millennium, 1e. Toronto: Nelson Education.

Davidson, D. (2017). Introducing The Tattoo Project, in Deborah Davidson (ed.) The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Davidson, D. & Duhig, A. (2017). Visual Research Methods: Memorial Tattoos as Memory-Realization, in Deborah Davidson (ed.) The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Davidson, D. (2017). Reflecting, in Deborah Davidson (ed.) The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Letherby, G. & Davidson, D. (2017). Creative Methodologies, in Deborah Davidson (ed.) The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Letherby, G. & Davidson, D. (2017). Tattooing as Auto/Biographical Method and Practice, in Deborah Davidson (ed.) The Tattoo Project: Commemorative Tattoos, Visual Culture, and the Digital Archive. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Davidson, D. (2105). Midwives and Loss, in Ruth Deery, Elaine Denny and Gayle Letherby (eds.) Sociology for Midwives. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Langan, D. & Davidson, D. (2011 & 2005). Rethinking Intimate Questions: Intimacy as Discourse, in Nancy Mandell and Ann Duffy (eds.) Canadian Families: Diversity, Conflict and Change. Toronto: Nelson and Thompson. Pp. 117-143.

Langan, D., Sheese, R., & Davidson. D. (2009). Beginning with Values: Constructive Teaching and Learning in Action, in Jack Mezirow and Ed Taylor and Associates. Transformative Learning in Practice: Insights from Community, Workplace, and Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Pp. 46-56.

Davidson, D. (2003). Woe the Women: DES, Mothers and Daughters, in Sarah Earle and Gayle Letherby (eds.) Gender, Identity & Reproduction: Social Perspectives. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan. Pp. 160-173.

Other Publications

Final Reports
Khanlou, N., Vazques, L. M., Davidson, D. & Aidarus, F. (2016). Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities & Inclusive Research: Why does it matter? Information Sheet #10 Office of Women’s Health Chair in Mental Health.

Khanlou, N., Nasim H., Davidson, D. & Dastjerdi, M. (2016). Voices of Immigrant Mothers of Children with Disabilities: Availability and use of Social Support. Report prepared for the Office of Echo Chair in Women’s Mental Health Research.

Commentary
Letherby, Gayle and Deborah Davidson (2013). Rocking or Not? Reflections from the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI) Annual Fall Conference 2012 Mothering and Reproduction. Crisis, Illness & Loss 21(2): 159–160.

Editorial positions held
Guest Editor (by invitation)

  • 2014—Co-Editor for Crisis, Illness & Loss, Special Edition on Creativity and Bereavement. October 2015 23(4) 10.1177/1054137315590738
  • 2010—Editorial Board Member, Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, Special Issue on Mothering, Bereavement, Loss and Grief.
  • 2008—Editorial Board Member, Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, Special Issue on Caregiving and Carework: Theory and Practice.
  • 2003—Editorial Board Member, Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, Special Issue on Motherwork.

Volunteer positions held

  • 2019– Matthew’s House Hospice, Alliston, ON
  • 2012–2015 Professional Advisory Committee, Bereaved Families of Ontario, Halton-Peel, Member
  • 2009–2012 Professional Advisory Committee, Bereaved Families of Ontario, Halton-Peel, Chair
  • 2003–2011 Bereaved Families of Ontario, Provincial Board, Member
  • 2003–2015 Bereaved Families of Ontario, Halton-Peel, Bereavement Volunteer

Television and radio
Broadcast Interviews

  • 2018-09-18—Are Temporary Tattoos a Sell-Out, BBC News, Dan Lytwyn.
  • *2018-08-27—Inking the Bond, The Morning Edition. Kitchener: CBC, Crait Norris.
  • *2018-08-27—Memorial tattoos part of grief process, says Waterloo prof.” CBC News, M. Ferrier.
  • *2018-09-30—Memorial Tattoos. The Mike Farwell Show. Kitchener: 570 News, Mike Farwell.
  • *2018-10-0—Memorial tattoos help cope with grief. CTV News Kitchener. Kitchener: CTV, Marta Czurylowicz.
  • 2017-02-11—Commemorative Tattoos, ABC TV (Australia) Weekend Breakfast Television.
  • 2013-09-03—A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, Independent Art & Culture, CHRY Radio.
  • 2013-08-15—A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, Barry Morgan Radio Show, CJAD Radio.
  • 2013-08-13—A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, Evening News, CBC Television.
    *Joint—Project Applicants for SSHRC Memorial Tattoos: Inking the Bond

Text Interviews

  • 2020-12-16 Grief, Steve McKinley, The Toronto Star.
  • 2020-09-29 Memorial Tattoos, Madasyn Kost, Calgary Journal.
  • 2020-09-24 Covid-19 Tattoos, Kim Zarzour, Torstar Corp.
  • 2020-09-10 Commemorative Tattoos, Shervin Abdolhamidi, The Brooklyner.
  • 2017-01-05 Commemorative Tattoos, Orangeville Banner.
  • 2017-01-27 Commemorative Tattoos, Orangeville Citizen.
  • 2013-10-04 Death and Memorial Tattoos, National Post.
  • 2013-08-29 A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, Daily Press & Argus.
  • 2013-08-13 A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, PostMedia.
  • 2013-08-12 A Digital Archive for Memorial Tattoos, The Toronto Star.

Invited Public Lectures/Presentations

  • 2020-10-14—The Tattoo Project—Tattoos and Trauma: Why We Commemorate, Scholars’ Hub, York University.
  • 2020-07-14—Speak Their Names: Memorializing with Tattoos, Compassionate Friends, Waterloo Region
  • 2020-05-30—Tattoos as Living Memorials, MADD Canada.
  • 2018-06—Opening of Wellington County’s “My Story, My Tattoo” photographic exhibit, Lennox and Addington County Museum & Archives.
  • 2016-08—ROM Speaks, An Industry INKED, Royal Ontario Museum.
  • 2016-06—Assault: The Roadshow, Scadding Court Community Centre.

Andrew Dawson

Associate Professor

BComm, University of Calgary (2000),
BA Sociology, University of Calgary (2000),
MA Sociology, McGill University (2005),
Ph.D. Sociology, McGill University (2011)

Twitter: @AND_Dawson
Faculty Profile

Biography

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the Glendon Campus of York University. I am a member of both the Graduate Program in Sociology and the Master’s in Public and International Affairs Program, and an Associate Editor of the Canadian Review of Sociology. In 2019–2020, I was a Visiting Scholar at Massey College, University of Toronto.

Originally from Alberta, I joined York University via Montreal, where I completed my MA and PhD in Sociology at McGill University, followed by a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Université de Montréal, jointly held between the Department of Political Science and CÉRIUM (the Centre for International Studies). My primary areas of research interest are political sociology, violence and development, with a focus on state legitimacy, political and social trust, democracy and the rule of law. I have pursued an empirical and cross-national research agenda in these fields that draws upon both quantitative and comparative historical methods. This research has been published in various sociology and social science journals, including the British Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Social Science History, World Development and Nationalism and Ethnic Politics.

Research areas

Political Sociology; State Legitimacy; Political and Social Trust; Law and Society; Violence; Sociology of Development; Comparative Historical Sociology; Quantitative Methods.

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on several projects. First, I am analyzing the data collected from my research funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. This project entailed the collection of historical homicide rate data over the last 250 years in both Ontario and Nova Scotia, creating the first long-term homicide rate time series for each province. Second, I am undertaking a project that draws upon quantitative, cross-national data to empirically assess the relationship between various characteristics of the state and homicide. Third, in collaboration with Isabel Krakoff, I am empirically investigating the macro- and micro-level correlates of political trust. Fourth, in collaboration with Dr. Cary Wu, I am exploring historical factors influencing contemporary levels of social trust in Quebec.

Selected Research Grants

Research Grant ($72,135), 2017-2019
The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
“An Analysis of the Long-Term Trajectories of Homicide Rates between the United States and Canada from the Mid-Eighteenth to the Twenty-First Century.”
Principal Investigator

Insight Grant ($178,080), 2016-2021
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
“Developing Conformity: Foreign Aid and the Diffusion of Global Norms.”
Research Collaborator

Graduate Supervision

I am currently open to taking on graduate students interested in political sociology, democracy, development, violence, trust, public opinion research, comparative sociology or related areas.

Graduate Students Supervised

PhD Students
Graduate Program in Sociology:
– Committee Member: Giselle Thompson (2020)
“National Debt and Public Education in Jamaica: ‘Glocal’ Challenges and Responses”

– Committee Member: Joshua Armstrong (current)

Master's Students
Graduate Program in Sociology:
– Second Reader: Kayla Jeffrey, MA Research Review Paper (2018)
“The Geographical Imagination: Imaginative Geographies and Its Influence on Development in the Global South”

– Second Reader: Leigh Denholm, MA Research Review Paper (2017)
“The Potential Praxis: Material and Philosophical Affinities of the Early Church and Marx”

Glendon School of Public and International Affairs:
– Second Reader: Louise Hartley, Master’s Major Research Paper (2016)
“Rwanda: Assessing Innovation in the Agricultural Sector”

Courses Taught

Graduate Teaching
Graduate Program in Sociology
– Comparative Historical Methods (SOCI 6090)
– Sociology of Global Development (SOCI 6660)

Master’s in Public and International Affairs
– The Dynamics of International Development (PIA 6339)

Refereed Journal Articles

Dawson, Andrew and Liam Swiss (2020). “Foreign Aid and the Rule of Law: Institutional Diffusion versus Legal Reach.” British Journal of Sociology 71 (4): 761-784.

Dawson, Andrew (2018). “Police Legitimacy and Homicide: A Macro-Comparative Analysis.” Social Forces 97 (2): 841-866.

Dawson, Andrew (2017). “Belief in State Legitimacy and Homicide: A Cross-National Analysis.” The Sociological Quarterly 58 (4): 552-575.

Dawson, Andrew (2016). “Political Violence in Consolidated Democracies: The Development and Institutionalization of Partisan Violence in Late Colonial Jamaica (1938-1962).” Social Science History 40 (2): 185-218.

Dawson, Andrew (2013). “The Social Determinants of the Rule of Law: A Comparison of Jamaica and Barbados.” World Development 45: 314-324.

Dawson, Andrew (2010). “State Capacity and the Political Economy of Child Mortality in Developing Countries Revisited: From Fiscal Sociology towards the Rule of Law.” International Journal of Comparative Sociology 51 (6): 403-422.

Lange, Matthew and Andrew Dawson (2010). “Education and Ethnic Violence: A Cross-National Time-Series Analysis.” Nationalism and Ethnic Politics 16 (2): 216-239.

Lange, Matthew and Andrew Dawson (2009). “Dividing and Ruling the World? A Statistical Test of the Effects of Colonialism on Postcolonial Civil Violence.” Social Forces 88 (2): 785-817.

Associate Editor, Canadian Review of Sociology

Manuscript Reviewer
American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Canadian Review of Sociology, Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre (University of Manchester), International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, McGill Sociological Review, Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, Sociology of Development, Studies in Comparative International Development and World Development.


photo of Conor DouglasConor M.W. Douglas

Assistant Professor

BA Sociology (Hons.) and Political Science (Maj.), University of Victoria,
MSc, Science and Technology Studies (cum laude), University of Amsterdam,
PhD, Sociology (of Science and Technology) University of York (UK)

Twitter: @cmwDouglas
Website
Website
Faculty Profile

Biography

I am sociologist of science, technology, health and medicine. I have been interested in sociological perspectives of new medical technologies for almost twenty years, and for the past fifteen years I have been more closely affiliated with the academic in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). This discipline, and the projects I work on, seek to assess the impact of sciences and technologies (like new genetic medical sciences) on social organization and social relations; and at the same point in time look at the social processes internal and external to science that influence how these novel science and technologies are developed and deployed.

I approach Science and Technology Studies (STS) in an multi and interdisciplinary way, and all of my research has been collaborative with international and Canadian colleagues across diverse faculties and departments, policy-makers, as well as patients and patient representatives. My methodological approach to research is a qualitative one, which involves: one-on-one interviews, group interviews, focus groups; participant observation; ethnographic research; and scenario studies. I also sit on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Responsible Innovation.

After completing my PhD at the University of York (in the Science and Technology Studies Unit within the Department of Sociology) I undertook interdisciplinary post-doctoral research at the University of British Columbia (Centre for Applied Ethics), VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam, and again at the University of British Columbia (Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences). Following that I received a limited-term Senior Lectureship in the Department of Technology and Society Studies at Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

Research areas

My research explores the co-production between science/technology (particularly new genetic medical technologies) and society; patient and public participation in science and technological development (particularly in clinical trials, research studies, and pharmaceutical policy); governance of science and technology (particularly new genetic medical technologies); social and cultural factors constraining or enabling the translation—or development and deployment—of science and technologies; as well as global health & governance (particularly as it relates to new medical technologies)

Current Research Activities

These research interests are currently being deployed in a new project Social Pharmaceutical Innovation (For Unmet Medical Needs), or “SPIN”, which I am the named Project Leader and Canadian national team Principal Investigator. This is a three year internationally collaborative project funded through the Trans-Atlantic Partnership and includes a team of researchers including Larry Lynd from British Columbia, Fernando Aith from Brazil, Vololona Rabeharisoa from France and Ellen Moors from the Netherlands.

Selected Research Grants

2020: Trans-Atlantic Partnership & Social Science and Humanities Research Council
of Canada: Social Pharmaceutical Innovation for Unmet Medical Need (SPIN) (Project Leader & Canadian Team PI: €398,000 total for the project / $100,000 for Canadian component)

2016: Research Stimulation Fund – Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University (Award Holder / PI: €2,500)
2014: Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Partnership for Health Services Improvement Grant: Informing Future Orphan Drug Coverage with Scenario Studies (iFOCUSS) (Listed co-applicant: $235,801)

2014: Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Planning and Dissemination Grant: Translating Research in E-health into Community Pharmacies (Listed co-applicant: $9,419)

2012: Visiting research fellowship at Centre de Sociologie de L’Innovation, Ecoles desMines ParisTech (Award Holder / PI: €2,500)

2007: Economic and Social Research Council (UK) Seminar Series (Award Holder / PI: £15,000)

2006: Economic and Social Research Council (UK), Genomics Policy and Research Forum postgraduate training and capacity building grant (Award Holder / PI: £20,000)

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting Graduate students for supervision in areas of medical science, health technologies, pharmaceutical innovation, policy and governance.

I have teaching qualifications and certification from the Netherlands, Canada, and the UK, which also includes experience and expertise in innovative pedagogy of Problem-Based Learning (PBL).

Graduate Students Supervised

Shir Grunebaum – Understanding assistive technology abandonment using Science and Technology Studies: ORCAM case study, MRP in Science and Technology Studies Graduate Program. Completed August, 2020.

Courses Taught

  • SOCI6381 “Health and Illness”;
  • STS6100 "Biomedicine and the late 20th / early 21st Century" (STS Grad Program);
  • NATS1760 Science, Technology and Society;
  • STS3600 “Technological Failure”;
  • STS3780 “Biomedical Science in Sociohistorical Context”;
  • STS3790 “Science and Technology Issues in Global Development”.

Refereed Journal Articles

Douglas, C.M.W. (revise and resubmit) New forms of collaboration needed to address challenges facing drugs for rare diseases. Canadian Medical Association Journal (Medicine & Society section).

Douglas, C.M.W., Dragojlovic, N.,, et al. (under review). Methodology for constructing scenarios for health policy research: The case of coverage decision-making for drugs for rare diseases in Canada. Technological Forecasting and Social Change.

Jansen, M.E. van den Bosch, L.J.M. Hendriks, M.J. Scheffer, M.M.J. Heijnen, M.L. Douglas, C.M.W and van El, C.G. (2019) Factors contributing to young new parents’ perspectives on retention and secondary use of neonatal dried bloodspots: A mixed methods study in the Netherlands. BMC Pediatrics.

Rizzardo, S., Bansback, N., Dragojlovic, N., Douglas, C., et al. (2019). Evaluating Canadians’ values for drug coverage decision making. Value in Health, 22(3), 362-369.

Stephens, N. Brown, N. and Douglas, C.M.W. (2018) Biobanks as sites of Bio-objectification. Life Sciences, Society and Policy. 14:6. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40504-018-0070-5

Douglas, C.M.W. Wilcox, E. Burgess, M. and Lynd, L. (2015) Why orphan drug coverage reimbursement decision-making needs patient and public involvement. Health Policy, 119 (5), 588-596.

Douglas, C.M.W. and Scheltens, P. (2015) Rethinking the products of translational medicine in the Netherlands: How the research process stands to matter for patient care. European Journal of Human Genetics, 23(6), 736-8.

Boeckhout M. and Douglas, C.M.W. (6 August 2015) Governing the research-care divide in clinical biobanking: Dutch perspectives. Life Sciences, Society and Policy, 11:7. doi:10.1186/s40504-015-0025-z

van Teeffelen, S. R., Douglas, C. M., van El, C. G., Weinreich, S. S., Henneman, L., Radstake, M., & Cornel, M. C. (2015) Mothers' Views on Longer Storage of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots for Specific Secondary Uses. Public Health Genomics, 19(1), 25-33.

Douglas, C.M.W. Lander, B. Fairley, C and Atkinson-Grosjean, J. (2015) The role of user/producer hybrids in the production of translational science. Social Epistemology, 29 (3), 323–343.

Douglas, C.M.W. (2014) The role of bioinformatics in facilitating translational
science and medicine. Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal Science & Technology Studies,/em>, 5 (1), 141-163. ISSN 2038-3460

Douglas, C.M.W. and Stemerding, D. (2014) Challenges for the European governance of synthetic biology. Life Sciences, Society and Policy, 10:6. doi.org/10.1186/s40504-014-0006-7.

Douglas, C.M.W. and Stemerding, D. (2013) Governing synthetic biology for global health through responsible research and innovation. Systems and Synthetic Biology, 7(3), 139-150.

Douglas, C.M.W. van El, C. Radstake, M et al. (2012) The politics of representation in the governance of emergent ‘secondary use’ biobanks: The case of dried blood spot cards in the Netherlands. Studies in Ethics Law & Technology, 6(1), Article 4.

Douglas, C.M.W. van El, C. Faulkner, A. and Cornel, M. (2012) Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking. Croatian Medical Journal,, 53,390-7.

Douglas, C. Goulding, R. Ferris, L. and Atkinson-Grosjean, J (2011) Socio-cultural characteristics of usability of bioinformatics databases and tools. Interdisciplinary Sciences Review, 36(1), 55-71.

Webster, A. Douglas, C. and Lewis, G. (2009) Making sense of medicine: ‘Lay pharmacology’, narratives of safety and efficacy. Science as Culture, 18(2), 233-47.

Douglas, C.M.W. (2005) Managing HuGE Expectations: Rhetorical Strategies in Human Genome Epidemiology. Science Studies, 18(2), 26-45.

Chapters in Books

Douglas, C.M.W. (2012) Bio-objectification of clinical research patients: Impacts on the stabilization of new medical technologies. In Niki Vermeulen, Sakari Tamminen, and Andrew Webster (eds.) Bio-objects: Life in the 21st,/sup> century. Aldershot, England: Ashgate Publishing.

Atkinson-Grosjean, J. and Douglas, C. (2010) “The ‘Third Mission’ and the laboratory: How translational science engages and serves the community,” in Hans Schuetze and Patricia Inman (eds.) Community Engagement and Service Mission of Universities. Leicester, England: NIACE Publications.

Webster, A. Douglas, C.M.W. and Sato, H. (2009) “Emergence of asbestos-related health issues and development of regulatory policy in the UK” in Hajime Sato (ed.) Management of Health Risks from Environment and Food: Policy and Politics of Health Risk Management in Five Countries—Asbestos and BSE (pp.63-100). The Netherlands: Springer.

Webster, A. Douglas, C.M.W. and Sato, H. (2009) “BSE in the United Kingdom,” in Hajime Sato (ed.) Management of Health Risks from Environment and Food: Policy and Politics of Health Risk Management in Five Countries—Asbestos and BSE (pp.221-265). The Netherlands: Springer.

Douglas, C. (2007) “Scientific literacy and public understandings of science”. George Ritzer (ed). Encyclopaedia of Sociology. Blackwell Publishing.

Other Publications

Douglas, C.M.W. (2014) Book review of Courtney Davies and John Abraham’s “Unhealthy Pharmaceutical Regulation” Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan 2013. 336 pages. Sociology of Health and Illness, 36(7), 1120–1122.

Douglas, C.M.W. (2012) Book review of Alex Faulkner’s “Medical Technology into Healthcare and Society: A Sociology of Devices, Innovation and Governance” Basingstoke, England: Palgrave MacMillan 2009. 264 pages. Science Studies, 25(1), 76-78.

Webster, A. Brown, N. Douglas, C. et al. (2008) “Public attitudes to third party access and benefit sharing: their application to UK Biobank,” Report to UK Biobank Ethics and Governance Council. Final Report (.pdf)

Brown, N. Douglas, C. Eriksson, L. Rodrigues, E. Yearley, S. and Webster, A. (2005) Researching expectations in medicine, technology and science: theory and method, Positioning paper for the York Workshop of the ‘Expectations Network’, 23 June 2005

2018–Present: Editorial Board (Journal of Responsible Innovation)

2014–2015: Positive Space Trainer & Resource Person (UBC)

2011–2015: Board Member (European Sociological Association)

2010–2013: Working Group Leader (COST Research Network)

2006–2008: Student Representative on EASST Council (European Association for the
Study of Science & Technology)

Science, technology and medicine are the main ways in which we establish truth in our society, tackle social problems, and determine health and illness. This represents considerable social power and promise. All of my work (both teaching and research) is interdisciplinary, and seeks to engage directly with science, technology and medicine to make it more socially responsible. Furthermore, my work carries a strong governance focus and research and teaching always addresses policy that seeks to produce socially robust science, technology and medicine.


Lorna Erwin

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Carlo Fanelli

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Amber Gazso

Associate Professor

BA Major in Criminal Justice, Minor in Sociology, University of the Fraser Valley,
MA, Sociology, Western University,
PhD, Sociology, University of Alberta

Faculty Profile
Website

Biography

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Graduate Program in Sociology and an associate member in the Graduate Programs of Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, Political Studies, and Interdisciplinary Studies.

My passion for sociology developed in the last two years of my undergraduate degree in criminal justice and especially after I took courses in the sociology of gender and the family at the (then) University College of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford, BC (now University of the Fraser Valley). While employed with the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) as a Correctional Officer, I chose to prolong the completion of my undergraduate degree in order to minor in sociology. By the time I had crossed the stage at convocation, I had already applied to several Sociology Master of Arts programs across Canada. After taking several educational leaves of absence from CSC, and after having moved back and forth across Canada (Abbotsford, BC -London, ON - Abbotsford, BC - Edmonton, AB - Abbotsford, BC) to complete my MA (Western University) and PhD (University of Alberta) in Sociology over 7 years, I eventually left my employment with CSC and, with pleasure, became employed as a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at York University.

I identify primarily as a feminist sociologist who specializes in the study of gender, family, low income, and the Canadian welfare state.

In general, I research the family as an institution and/or ideological construct and families as relational experiences, practices and processes of everyday living experienced by individuals. In much of my research, I tend to work with an understanding of gender as a social structure that (re)produces differences and inequalities and critically engage with how its personal and social, hierarchical dimensions inter-locks with those of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, ability, and citizenship. Broadly speaking, my research is underscored by three related goals. I seek to understand:

  • how the meanings attached to family and gender change over time;
  • the relations and practices (e.g. paid and unpaid work; exchanges of instrumental and expressive support) engaged in by family members, these informed by gendered and sexual selves;
  • and, the processes of being, becoming, or con¬structing gender and family identities and relations, especially in opposition to ‘dominant norms’ of family life—e.g. the construction of fictive kin families.

My research specifically focuses on how families and gender relations are connected to and/or shaped by the social policy and programs of the Canadian welfare state. Overall, I pay a great deal of attention persons and families experiencing low income.

To date, a central goal of this specific program of research is my deliberate juxtaposition of policy discourse and ideology (e.g. neo-liberalism) with the everyday experiences of individuals, especially parents. I aim to uncover the disconnections, tensions, and possible congruities that materialize when we compare and contrast how single women and men, or mothers and fathers, (where individuals self-define as straight or LGBTIQ2SA, as white or Black, Indigenous and People of Colour) are conceptualized and their eligibility constituted in social policies such as social assistance (e.g. Ontario Works) and how they actually live out their family lives. While the totality of my research is empirical and multi-method, I am drawn to discourse analysis and in-depth interviewing in order to meet this particular goal.

If not sociology… I would have spent years in education and training to achieve the career of “art historian,” or “professional equestrian” specializing in Grand Prix dressage.

Research areas

I am committed to the following main areas of research: citizenship; sociology of the family and intimate relations; sociology of gender and sexuality; poverty; social policy; research methods (with concentration on qualitative); and the welfare state.

Current Research Activities

I am currently engaged in research on:

  • the intergenerational transmission of social assistance receipt in Ontario;
  • the experiences of persons managing substance use dependency while on Ontario Works;
  • how people experiencing low income navigate relationships with Ontario Works as well as criminal justice, addiction and mental health, and child welfare systems;
  • how new immigrant Chinese and South Asian families experience settlement in Canada.

For some of these projects, specific research questions are outlined immediately below.

Selected Research Grants

The Systems of Our Lives: Navigating Multiple Systems While Living on Low Income (Principal Investigator) 2020–
This project is pursued with a team of researchers (Tracy-Smith Carrier and Carrie Smith, Kings College @ Western; Stephanie Baker Collins, McMaster) and in collaboration with Toronto Employment and Social Services. Over a three year period, we will explore:

  1. How do social assistance, criminal justice, addiction and mental health, and child welfare systems organize individuals’ lives and interact or collide in doing so?
  2. How do individuals experiencing multiple barriers navigate these systems? What, if any, role do social support networks play in individuals’ strategies of navigation?
  3. What burdens does this system navigation place on individuals and how might they differ from the burdens placed on the social assistance system?
  4. How do ascribed and assumed identities and subjectivities change, coincide, or potentially conflict in the experience of navigating multiple systems?
  5. To what ends does individuals’ system navigation produce? For example, does a parent self-define as in recovery, regain custody of their child, and then exit assistance into paid work?

Ultimately, we will query whether the experience of system navigation produces experiences and perceptions of social inclusion or exclusion.
(SSHRC funded, Grant no. 435-2020-1203). Ongoing.

Myth or Reality? Examining Parent-Child Income Assistance Use in Ontario, Canada (Co-investigator) 2020–
In this three year project with a team of researchers (Tracy-Smith Carrier and Carrie Smith, Kings College @ Western; Stephanie Baker Collins, McMaster), we continue an exploratory sequential mixed methods research study to explore the nature of intergenerational income assistance (IA) participation in Ontario, Canada. This funded study builds on the extant work by the authors that first employed qualitative methods to explore participants’ experiences and perspectives on intergenerational IA usage, including the social, economic, health (and/or mental health) and environmental factors that influence IA access for parents and their adult children. This specific study and second phase of the research involves quantitative methods to examine whether there is an intergenerational IA correlation or causal link, with particular attention to the factors that contribute to parent-child IA usage.
(SSHRC funded, Grant no. 435-2020-0085). Ongoing.

Stalled Mobility? Income Inequality and Intergenerational Relationships Among Newcomer South Asian and Chinese Households in York Region (Co-investigator) 2017–
In collaboration with my colleagues and fellow researchers (Nancy Mandell, Guida Man, and Larry Lam), we explore the complexities among newcomer South Asian and Chinese households in York Region. Specifically, our overall objective is to inter- and intra-ethnically compare the types of economic, social and cultural strategies South Asian and Chinese households employ to survive and how this impacts their intergenerational family relationships. Several secondary research questions underpin this objective: How might income inequality be differently experienced in the households of recent immigrants of Chinese descent versus those of South Asian descent? How do these newcomers mobilize their existing economic, social and cultural capital in their settlement? What are the new income strategies that newcomers adopt? How do these strategies affect opportunities for income mobility for younger generations? How might intergenerational family relationships be preserved or strained by the income strategies of newcomers?
(funds allocated via SSHRC partnership grant) Ongoing.

Exploring the Welfare-to-Work Experiences of Ontario Works’ Recipients Living with Addiction (Principal Investigator) 2015–
This project explores how Ontario's social assistance policy, Ontario Works (OW), is experienced by benefit recipients who are recovering from addiction to substances (e.g. alcohol and drugs). The primary questions of this research are:

  1. What policy and health discourses shape eligibility for OW for persons recovering from addiction?;
  2. What are the welfare-to-work experiences of persons recovering from addiction?;

And related to these questions, other secondary ones include: How is addiction defined and perceived by the Ministry of Community and Social Services? How might the OW experience of single individuals differ from those who have dependents? And how might gender and race/ethnicity shape these experiences?
Findings published in Critical Social Policy. Ongoing.

Graduate Supervision

I am open to discussing supervision or membership on supervisory committees.

Graduate Students Supervised

PhD Dissertations supervised to completion (supervisor)

2017 Shihoko Nakagawa: “Intersections of Welfare and Child Welfare Systems and Single Mothers’ Activism in the U.S.”
(Graduate program in Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies)

PhD Dissertations supervised to completion (advisory committee member)

2020 Nick Cristiano: “Raving Reviews: An Ethnographic Look at Club Drug Use and
Risk Reduction Within Normalized Contexts.”
2019 Ishrat Sultana: “Life in a Camp: Exploring Youth Identities of Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh”
2016 Benjamin Christenson: “Mobilizing Policies and the Future of Inequality: Pension Policy in Ontario 1995–2013”
2016 Angele Alook: “Indigenous Life Courses: Racialized Gendered Life Scripts and Cultural Identities of Resistance and Resilience.”
2013 Latoya Lazarus: “The Church is the Law: Examining the Role of Christianity in Shaping
Sexual Politics in Jamaica”
2013 Alison Jenkins Jayman: “Paying the Price: Women, Breast Cancer Care and Health Insurance in Ontario and New York”
2011 Katherine Osterlund: “Towards A Sociological Theory of Monogamy”

Courses Taught

I have taught or continue to teach the following graduate courses in Sociology: Sex and Gender in Social Theory; Qualitative Methods; Survey Research Methos; Critical Social Policy Analysis

Books

Gazso, Amber and Karen Kobayashi, Editors. 2018. Continuity and Innovation: Canadian Families in the New Millennium. Toronto: Nelson.

Bischoping, Katherine and Amber Gazso. 2016. Analyzing Talk in the Social Sciences: Conversation, Discourse, and Narrative Strategies. London: Sage.

Select Refereed Journal Article

Gazso, Amber, Tracy Smith-Carrier, Stephanie Baker-Collins, and Carrie Smith. 2020. The Generationing of Social Assistance Receipt and “Welfare Dependency” in Toronto, Canada. Social Problems 67(3), 585-601. doi.org/10.1093/socpro/spz032
(on-line 2019)

Gazso, Amber. 2020.“Dueling Discourses, Power, and the Construction of the Recovering Addict: When Social Assistance Confronts Addiction in Toronto, Canada.” Critical Social Policy 40(1) 1-21, 130-150.
doi.org/10.1177/0261018319839158 (on-line 2019)

Smith-Carrier, Tracy, Amber Gazso, Stephanie Baker Collins, and Carrie Smith. 2019. “Myth or Reality? Exploring Intergenerational Social Assistance Participation in Ontario, Canada.” Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 46(1), 113-137. Available at:
scholarworks.wmich.edu/jssw/vol46/iss1/8

Webb, Jason, and Amber Gazso. 2017. “Being Homeless and Becoming Housed: The Interplay of Fateful Moments and Social Support in Neo-liberal Context.” Studies in Social Justice 11(1): 65-85. doi.org/10.26522/ssj.v11i1.1398

Gazso, Amber, Susan McDaniel and Ingrid Waldron. 2016. “Networks of Social Support to Manage Poverty: More Changeable than Durable.” Journal of Poverty 20(4): 441-463.
doi.org/10.1080/10875549.2015.1112869

Gazso, Amber and Susan McDaniel. 2015. “Families by Choice and the Management of Low Income through Social Supports.” Journal of Family Issues 36(3), 371-395.
doi.org/10.1177%2F0192513X13506002

McDaniel, Susan, Amber Gazso, and Seonggee Um. 2013. “Generationing Relations in Challenging Times: Americans and Canadians in Mid-Life in the Great Recession.” Current Sociology, 61, 301-321.
doi.org/10.1177%2F0011392113475806

Gazso, Amber. 2012. “Moral Codes of Mothering and the Introduction of Welfare-to-Work in Ontario.” Canadian Review of Sociology 49(1): 26-49.

Gazso, Amber and Susan McDaniel. 2010. “The Risks of Being a Single Mother on Income Support in Canada and the United States.” International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 30(7/8): 368-386.

Gazso, Amber. 2009. “Gendering the “Responsible Risk Taker”: Citizenship Relationships with Gender Neutral Social Assistance Policy.” Citizenship Studies 13(1): 45-63.
doi.org/10.1080/13621020802586743

Gazso, Amber. 2007. “Balancing Expectations for Employability and Family Responsibilities While on Social Assistance: Low Income Mothers’ Experiences in Three Canadian Provinces.” Family Relations 56 (5): 454-466.
doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2007.00473.x

Gazso, Amber. 2004. “Women’s Inequality in the Workplace as Framed in News Discourse: Refracting from Gender Ideology.” Canadian Review of Anthropology and Sociology 41(4): 449-473.
doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-618X.2004.tb00786.x

Gazso-Windle, Amber and Julie Ann McMullin. 2003. “Doing Domestic Labour: Strategizing in a Gendered Domain.” Canadian Journal of Sociology 28(3): 341-366.

Select Chapters in Books

Gazso, Amber, and Jason Webb. 2019. “Multiple Jeopardies and Liminality in Low Income Mothering: Experiencing and Resisting Social Exclusion.” In Motherhood and Social Exclusion, edited by Christie Byvelds and Heather Jackson. Toronto: Demeter Press.

Gazso, Amber and Katherine Bischoping. 2018. “Reframing an Awkward Moment: A Comparison of Two Analytic Strategies for Being Reflexive.” In The Craft of Qualitative Research, edited by Steven Kleinknecht, Lisa-Jo van den Scott, and Carrie B. Sanders.

Gazso, Amber. 2016. “Low Income Lone Mothers and “Home”: The Importance of Social Relations.” In Sociology of Home, edited by G. Anderson, L. Suski, and J. Moore. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Gazso, Amber. 2015. “Gendering Social Assistance Reform. In Welfare Reform in Canada: Provincial Social Assistance in Comparative Perspective, edited by Daniel Béland and Pierre-Marc Daigneault. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Scobie, Olivia and Amber Gazso. 2013. “‘It was easier to say I didn’t have kids’: Mothering, Incarceration, and Relationships with Social and Criminal Justice Policies.” In Incarcerated Mothers: Oppression and Resistance. Toronto: Demeter Press.


Amanda Glasbeek

Associate Professor

B.A., Sociology Trent University, (1989),
M.A., Sociology, Carleton University, (1992),
Ph.D., Women’s Studies, York University, (2003).

Faculty Profile

I am a “lapsed” sociologist, but a sociologist at heart. Now teaching in Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies in the Department of Social Science, and having earned a doctorate in (then-named) Women’s Studies at York University, I am, by instinct and training, an interdisciplinary scholar who draws on a wide range of sources, methods, and theories to interrogate diverse sociolegal problems. My research interests have travelled from Canadian women’s crime and criminal justice history to contemporary sex trafficking to gendered discourses of urban risk to the specifically gendered and racialized contours of contemporary surveillance culture, especially with respect to policing. What all these various sites of inquiry have in common is my abiding interest in, and curiosity about, the ways in which crime and processes of criminalization are both animated by, while also being productive of, dominant relations of class, race, and gender. Researching such questions through a critical, intersectional lens inspired by all of socialist-feminist, Foucauldian, and critical race theories allows for exciting and – often – unexpected sites of exploration.

Research areas

Crime/criminalization, feminist surveillance studies, gender and crime, policing, body-worn cameras.

Current Research Activities

I am currently completing a SSHRC-funded research project on Body-Worn Cameras (BWCs) in Canada. This project is less concerned with whether BWCs “work” than in the work that BWCs do. Specifically, I am interested in the ways in which claims about “accountability” and racist policing intersect with the “visibility” promised by BWCs. Drawing on interviews with police from a variety of jurisdictions across Canada, as well as legal and privacy experts and members of social justice and copwatching groups, this project interrogates the ways in which BWCs do – or do not – offer promises of racialized justice in policing, and focuses on the discursive work of BWCs in the attempt to manage the increasing demands on Canadian police to restore community trust and legitimacy.

My interest in surveillance also extends to its (also contested) contribution to gendered justice, especially in relation to sexual violence against women. Building from an earlier SSHRC grant on Toronto women’s experiences with urban CCTV (in both public and private spaces), this project begins from many of the interviewed women’s expressed hopes that CCTV can act as a “witness” to sexual violence and, thus, lend credibility to their testimonies. Looking at court transcripts from cases in which CCTV was used as evidence in sexual assault trials in Canada (2013-2020), I interrogate the value of CCTV as a “silent witness” to women’s experiences of violence. This project identifies a key gap between court reliance on CCTV as an “objective” tool by which to identify suspects and the actual trying of sexual violence cases, which tend to turn not on the question of identification but, instead, on the question of consent. As a result, CCTV has proven to be a much more difficult evidentiary tool than is typically assumed.

Finally, my work on policing accountability – in particular, racial accountability - developed through the BWC project, has inspired a new edited book project on managing demands for racial justice through police reform. Motivated in large part by the global uprisings over racialized police brutality in the Summer of 2020, including, but not limited to, demands for both defunding and – more radically – demobilizing police, this project, undertaken with a colleague at Dalhousie University, asks about the potential, and limits, of policing reform at this historical juncture in which systemic racism in policing has finally been acknowledged. What does this recognition mean for policing reform? How do the institutional arrangements of policing adopt, manage, coopt, or deflect demands for racial justice? And how do social justice groups approach, navigate, and achieve meaningful change? Looking at a range of topics, from police apologies, to demands for better training, to the use of technologies (statistics collections, BWCs, data analytics, etc), to defund and demobilization movements, this book project aims to engage scholarly and community conversations about what policing reform looks like in this profoundly important moment.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2015–19. SSHRC Insight Grant ($171,195). Principle Investigator: The Policing View: Body-Worn Cameras, Surveillance and the Question of Police Accountability (Completed).
  • 2012. SSHRC Aid to Research Workshops and Conferences in Canada Grant ($22,500). Critical Perspectives on Canadian Anti-Trafficking Policy. November 30–December 2, 2012, Ryerson University (Completed).
  • 2011–13. SSHRC Insight Development Grant ($58,600). Co-Investigator: The Gendered Lens: A Pilot Project on Women’s Experiences with Video Surveillance and Urban Security in Toronto (P.I.: Dr. Emily van der Meulen, Ryerson University). (Completed).

I am currently supervising 7 PhD students (5 in Socio-Legal Studies, 2 in Sociology). I am, therefore, currently only taking on new students who have a demonstrated and direct link to my identified areas of research and interest.

Graduate Students Supervised

  • Mandi Gray, Sociology, “Cease/Desist or Cease/Resist? Sexual Violence and Civil Suits”. 2016–date.
  • Lucinda Yae-Rim Ro, Sociology, Dissertation title TBA, 2020–date.
  • Monika Lemke, Socio-Legal Studies, “Constituting the search of persons: A sensori-legal study of the search of persons at the Toronto Police Service”. 2018–date.
  • Terry Trowbridge, Socio-Legal Studies, Dissertation title TBA 2019–date.
  • Jessica Malandrino, Socio-Legal Studies, Dissertation title TBA 2019–date.
  • Mariful Alam, Socio-Legal Studies, Dissertation title TBA 2019–date.
  • Patrick Dwyer, Socio-Legal Studies Dissertation title TBA 2019–date.

Courses Taught

  • 2017/18 GS/SLST 6040 3.0 “Law, Crime & Exclusion” (as “Surveillance and the Production of Crime”)
  • 2016/17 GS/SLST 6040 3.0 “Law, Crime & Exclusion” (as “Surveillance and the Production of Crime”)
  • 2014/15 GS/SLST 6100 3.0 “Major Research Paper Seminar”
  • 2013/14 GS/SLST 6100 3.0 “Major Research Paper Seminar”
  • 2012/13 GS/SLST 6100 3.0 “Major Research Paper Seminar”
  • 2010/11 GS/SLST 6030 3.0 “Politics of Security and Regulation”

Books

2014 Deborah Brock, Amanda Glasbeek, and Carmela Murdocca (eds). Criminalization, Representation, and Regulation: Thinking Differently About Crime. Toronto: University of Toronto Press

2009 Amanda Glasbeek. Feminized Justice: The Toronto Women’s Court, 1913-1934. Vancouver: UBC Press

2006 Amanda Glasbeek (ed). Moral Regulation and Governance in Canada: History, Context and Critical Issues. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Refereed Journal Articles

2020 Amanda Glasbeek, Katrin Roots and Mariful Alam. Seeing and Not-Seeing: Race and Body Worn Cameras in Canada, Surveillance and Society 18 (3): 328-342. 10.24908/ss.v18i3.13259

2019 Amanda Glasbeek, Katrin Roots & Mariful Alam. Time, Postcolonialism and Body Worn Cameras Surveillance and Society 17 (5): 743-746. 10.24908/ss.v17i5.13451

2016 Amanda Glasbeek, ’They catch you doing the simple human things’: CCTV, Privacy, and Gendered Exposure. Journal of Law and Equality 12 (Special Issue on Gender), 63-88.

2015 Jordana Wright, Amanda Glasbeek and Emily van der Meulen. (2014). Securing the Home: Gender, CCTV and the Hybridized Space of Apartment Buildings. Theoretical Criminology. 19 (1), 95-111.
10.1177/1362480614544210

2013 Amanda Glasbeek. ‘An avalanche of tragedy’: Modern Girls and the Murder of Mrs. Mick. International Review of Victimology 19 (1), 7-22.

2006 Amanda Glasbeek. ‘My wife has endured a torrent of abuse’: Gender, safety and anti-squeegee discourses in Toronto, 1998–2000. Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice, 24 (1), 55-76.

1998 Amanda Glasbeek. Maternalism Meets the Criminal Law: The Case of the Toronto Women’s Court. Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 10 (2), 480-502

Chapters in Books

2020 Accountability, Discretion, and the Questions We Ask. In Bryce Newell, ed. Police on Camera: Surveillance, Privacy, and Police Accountability (Routledge): 147-153

2014 Amanda Glasbeek and Emily van der Meulen. The Paradox of Visibility: Women, CCTV, and Crime. In Elizabeth Comack and Gillian Balfour, eds., Criminalizing Women: Gender and (In)Justice in Neoliberal Times 2e. Halifax and Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing, 219-235. (first author)

2014 Amanda Glasbeek. History Matters. In D. Brock, A. Glasbeek, C. Murdocca, eds. Criminalization, Representation, and Regulation: Thinking Differently about Crime. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 29-48.

2014 Amanda Glasbeek. Women Gone Bad? Gender and Crime. In D. Brock, A. Glasbeek, C. Murdocca, eds. Criminalization, Representation, and Regulation: Thinking Differently about Crime. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 163–190.

2010 Amanda Glasbeek. Apprehensive Wives and Intimidated Mothers: Women, Fear of Crime, and the Criminalization of Poverty in Toronto. In Diane Crocker and Val Marie Johnson, (eds). Poverty, Regulation and Social Justice: Readings on the Criminalization of Poverty Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 123–138


Luin Goldring

Professor

B.A., Anthropology, California State University,
M.S., Rural Sociology, Cornell University,
Ph.D., Development Sociology, Cornell University.

Faculty Profile
Website
Citizenship and Employment Precarity (CEP) Project
Immigrants in the Global Economy Project

I am a professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology at York University. I am affiliated with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC) and the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS).

My areas of research center on migrations and mobilities; the ways that people experience state policies in their every-day lives; legal status bordering, negotiations and trajectories; and migrant community organizing. These interests have been informed by spending formative years in Mexico City, where I was born; living in California, upstate New York, San Diego and Chicago; and since 1995, in Toronto. Along the way, I also spent time in Niger, Zacatecas, and Victoria. I am aware of my privilege as a mobile social actor, tri-national citizen, and settler in Canada.

Research areas

My current research is motivated by questions about how legal status and legal status trajectories are assembled at various scales and temporalities by institutional and social actors, and how legal status trajectories contribute to differential inclusion for noncitizens and citizens. I am interested in how legal status trajectories contribute to inclusion and exclusion in various domains (employment, education), and how differential inclusion is dynamically racialized and gendered. In a current research project on Citizenship and Employment Precarity (funded by SSHRC), Patricia Landolt (co-investigator) and I examine the relationship between changes in legal status, employment precarity, and indicators of well-being using original data from an online survey (n~1,200 people who arrived as temporary entrants or visitors). In a related project, we are working with FCJ Refugee Centre to analyze the experiences of non-status residents during the pandemic.

This work contributes to scholarship on precarious status in Canada. With colleagues, I have been involved in conceptualizing noncitizen precarious legal status. The concept does not focus on one particular status, but rather, draws attention to the role of state policies in producing legal status precarity that includes temporary situations and migrant ‘illegalization.’ The rise in temporary migration and proliferation of temporary and probationary entrance categories has contributed to producing precarious legal status trajectories that are multi-directional and temporally uncertain. As a result, people may experience various formal statuses, and disjunctures between status and access to social goods and entitlements.

Boundaries of belonging are drawn, redrawn and contested in several arenas. In a project led by Patricia Landolt, the research team interviewed a range of actors to examine how access to public education for non-status students is organized, and how this access is experienced by parents and students. A chapter in a book edited by Bada and Gleeson offers an analysis of the role of school principals in bordering access to education.

Earlier research on precarious status and precarious employment focused on the experiences of Caribbean and Latin American born newcomers (Immigrants in the Global Economy Project). Publications from that project appeared in Globalizations, an IRPP report, Citizenship Studies, several book chapters, a popular education handbook and online Research Briefs.

In a collaborative project with Audrey Macklin, Jennifer Hyndman and Anna Korteweg, we have examined the expectations of private sponsors of Syrian refugees. Publications to date include an article in Canadian Ethnic Studies and chapter in a book edited by Labman and Cameron. The project provided training and co-authorship for several graduate students, including Kathryn Barber, from our program.

Soon after coming to York I embarked on collaborative research on Latin American community organizing with Patricia Landolt (University of Toronto) and Judith Bernhard (Ryerson) as part of a project led by Michael Lanphier (York University). Publications from that work appeared as chapters and articles in Ethnic and Racial Studies, American Behavioral Studies, and Global Networks.

Earlier research on relations between the Mexican state and Mexican migrant hometown organizations was published in the Latin American Research Review, Identities, and chapters in English and Spanish language collections. Research on ejido reform was published in several chapters.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020 “Non-status migrant exclusions and responses under COVID in the GTA”. L. Goldring, PI. SSHRC COVID-19 Partnership Engage Grant. Partner: FCJ Refugee Centre.
  • 2018 “Using Secondary Data to Analyze the Legal Status Trajectories of Refugee Claimants in Canada.” L. Goldring, PI. Co-applicants: Yoko Yoshida, Jonathan Amoyaw, Patricia Landolt. CYRRC grant.
  • 2018 “Precarious Noncitizenship through the life course.” Patricia Landolt, PI. Co-investigator. SSHRC PDG.
  • 2016 “The sponsor's perspective: motivations, expectations and experiences of private sponsors of Syrian refugees.” Audrey Macklin, PI. Co-applicant, together with Jennifer Hyndman and Anna Korteweg. SSHRC/IRCC Targeted Research: Syrian Refugee Arrival, Resettlement and Integration.
  • 2015 “Expanding Access to Post-Secondary Education.” YUFA Community Projects Committee. Support for Matching Funds GA to hire T. Aberman. Report is posted on YUFA website.
  • 2013 “New and old fault lines in the Canadian labour market: the temporal and institutional dynamics of citizenship, legal status and work.” 5 year SSHRC Insight Grant. Principal Investigator. Patricia Landolt, co-investigator.
  • 2010 “Negotiating the Boundaries of Rights and Membership.” Standard SSHRC Grant. Co-applicant. Patricia Landolt, PI.
  • 2010 “Precarious Employment and Poverty in Southern Ontario.” 5 year CURA grant. Co-investigator. Wayne Lewchuck, Principal Investigator. socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/cms/socsci/pepso
  • 2007 “Public Outreach Partnership on Immigration, Settlement and Precarious Employment.” Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. 18-month project to disseminate findings from 3-year INE study. PI. Patricia Landolt, co-investigator.
  • 3/05 “Living with less than full status.” Community-University Research Alliance (CURA). Letter of Intent approved by the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada. Co-investigator. Judith Bernhard, Principal Investigator.
  • 7/03 “Immigrants in the Global Economy: Precarious Employment and the Transnational Dimensions of Economic Incorporation.” Three-year INE grant (Initiative for the New Economy), Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada. Principal Investigator. Co-investigator: Patricia Landolt
  • 4/02 “Exploring Social Cohesion in a Globalizing Era.” Three-year Social Cohesion Strategic Grant. Co-Investigator. Michael Lanphier, Principal Investigator. Co-investigator with other colleagues. www.yorku.ca/cohesion/

I welcome inquiries from graduate students interested in migration and mobilities; precarious legal status, citizenship and non-citizenship studies; Latin American and Latinx studies; and other projects to which I might contribute. I will contribute actively to your academic training and professional development; you should be both self-directed and willing to take direction.

Graduate Students Supervised & Postdoctoral Supervison

MA Students

  • Sharlene Molette. MES, Faculty of Environmental Studies. Thesis supervisor. 2000.
  • Jasmin Hristov. MA Sociology. 2005.
  • Hannah Caplan. MA Sociology. 2006.
  • Samia Saad. MA Interdisciplinary Studies. 2011.
  • Xiomara Peraza. MA Communication and Culture. 2006.
  • Chrissy Diavatopolous. MA Sociology. 2008.
  • Heather Brady. MA Sociology. 2011.
  • Sarah Fleming. MA Critical Disability Studies. Advisor (Supervisor). 2011.
  • Samia Tecle. MA Environmental Studies. Supervisor. 2012.
  • Teresa Greco. MA Sociology. 2013.
  • Jana Borras. MA Sociology. 2017.
  • Santhia Akram. MA Sociology. 2019.

PhD Students

  • Madeleine Wong. PhD Geography. Co-supervisor. 2003.
  • Kathryn Barber. Ph.D Sociology (ABD, in progress), 2014-present.
  • Jana Borras. PhD Sociology (ABD, in progress), 2017-present.
  • Giovanni Carranza. Ph.D Sociology (in progress), 2018-present.
  • Sarah Marshall. Ph.D Sociology (in progress), 2018-present.

Postdoctoral Supervision

  • Geraldina Polanco. SSHRC post-doctoral fellow. 2013-15. (Assistant Prof. at McMaster)

Students outside of York
I serve or have served on the committees of graduate students at Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, the Colegio de Michoacán, and the Universidad Autónoma de México-Iztapalapa.

Courses Taught

SOCI 6000.06—Graduate Sociology Workshop
SOCI 6675.03—Political Sociology: Non-citizenship
SOCI 6614.03—Migration and Transnationalisms
SOCI 6060.03—Qualitative Methods
SOCI 6611.06A—International Migration

Books

Goldring, L. and P. Landolt (eds.) 2013. Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada. University of Toronto Press.

Goldring, L. and S. Krishnamurti (eds.). 2007. Organizing the Transnational: Labour, politics and social change. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. (Co-author: introduction and conclusion).

Refereed Journal Articles

Macklin, Audrey, Kathryn Barber, Luin Goldring, Jennifer Hyndman, Anna Korteweg, Shauna Labman, Jona Zyfi. 2018. “A Preliminary Investigation into Private Refugee Sponsors.” Canadian Ethnic Studies 50 (2): 35-58.

Landolt, Patricia and Luin Goldring. 2015. “Assembling Noncitizenship through the Work of Conditionality.” Citizenship Studies 19 (8): 853-869 (16 pgs.) Special issue: Theorising Noncitizenship.

Lewchuck, Wayne, Michelynn Lafleche, Diane Dyson, Luin Goldring, Alan Meisner, Stephanie Procyk, Dan Rosen, John Shields, Peter Viducis, Sam Vrankulj. 2014. “Is Precarious Employment Low Income Employment? The Changing Labour Market in Southern Ontario.” Just Labour 22 (Autumn): 51-73.

Riaño-Alcalá, Pilar and Luin Goldring. 2014. “Unpacking Refugee Community Transnational Organizing: The Challenges and Diverse Experiences of Colombians in Canada.” Refugee Survey Quarterly 33(2): 1-28. doi:10.1093/rsq/hdu005

Tecle, Samia and Luin Goldring. 2013. “From ‘remittance’ to ‘tax’: the shifting meanings and strategies of capture of the Eritrean transnational party-state.” African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal 6(2): 1-19.

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2012. “The Impact of Precarious Legal Status on Immigrants' Economic Outcomes.” IRPP Study no. 35. Montreal: Institute for Research on Public Policy.

Landolt, Patricia, Luin Goldring & Judith K. Bernhard. 2011. “Agenda Setting and Immigrant Politics: the Case of Latin Americans in Toronto.” American Behavioral Scientist 55(9): 1235–1266.

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2011. “Caught in the Work-Citizenship Matrix: The lasting effects of precarious legal status on work for Toronto immigrants.” Globalizations 8(3): 325–341.

Landolt, Patricia and Luin Goldring. 2010. “Political Cultures and Transnational Social Fields: Chilean, Colombian and Canadian Activists in Toronto.” Global Networks 10(4): 443–466.

Landolt, Patricia and Luin Goldring. 2009. “Immigrant Political Socialization as Bridging and Boundary Work: Mapping the Multi-Layered Incorporation of Latin American Immigrants in Toronto,” Ethnic and Racial Studies 32(7): 1226–1247.

Goldring, Luin, Carolina Berinstein and Judith K. Bernhard. 2009. “Institutionalizing Precarious Immigration Status in Canada.” Citizenship Studies 13(3): 239–265

Bernhard, Judith K., Patricia Landolt and Luin Goldring. 2009. “Transnationalizing Families: Canadian Immigration Policy and the Spatial Fragmentation of Care-giving among Latin American Newcomers.” International Migration,/em> 47(2): 3–31.

Bernhard, Judith K., Luin Goldring, Julie Young, Carolina Berinstein and Beth Wilson. 2007. “Living with Precarious Legal Status in Canada: Implications for the Wellbeing of Children and Families.” Refuge 24(2): 101–114.

Goldring, Luin. 2004. “Individual and Collective Remittances to Mexico: A Multi-dimensional Typology of Remittances.” Development and Change 35(4): 799–840.

Goldring, Luin. 2002. “The Mexican State and Transmigrant Organizations: Negotiating the Boundaries of Membership and Participation in the Mexican Nation.” Latin American Research Review 37(3): 55–99.

Goldring, Luin. 2001. “The Gender and Geography of Citizenship in Mexico-U.S. Transnational Spaces.” Identities 7(4): 501–537.

Goldring, Luin. 1998. "The Power of Status in Transnational Social Fields.” Comparative Urban and Community Research Vol. 6:165–195.

Massey, Douglas, Luin Goldring and Jorge Durand. 1994. "Continuities in Transnational Migration: An Analysis of Nineteen Mexican Communities." American Journal of Sociology 99(6): 1492–1533.

Goldring, Luin. 1992. "La Migración México-EUA y la Transnacionalización del Espacio Político y Social: Perspectivas Desde el México Rural." (Mexico-U.S. Migration and the Transnationalization of Social and Political Space: Perspectives from Rural Mexico.) Estudios Sociológicos X (29): 315–340.

Chapters in Books (Refereed)

Macklin, Audrey, Kathryn Barber, Luin Goldring, Jennifer Hyndman, Anna Korteweg, Jona Zyfi. 2020. “Kindred Spirits? Links Between Refugee Sponsorship and Family Sponsorship.” Ch.9 pp. 177-197 in Shauna Labman and Geoffrey Cameron (eds.) Strangers to Neighbours: Refugee Sponsorship in Context. Montreal-Queens University Press.

Landolt, Patricia and Luin Goldring. 2019. “Assembling Noncitizen Access to Education in a Sanctuary City: The Place of Public School Administrator Bordering Practices.” Ch. 8 in Xóchitl Bada and Shannon Gleeson (eds.) Accountability Across Borders: Migrant Rights in North America. University of Texas Press.

Goldring, Luin. 2014. "Resituating Temporariness as the Precarity and Conditionality of Non-citizenship.” Pp. 218-254 in Leah F. Vosko, Valerie Preston, Robert Latham (eds.). Liberating Temporariness: Migration, Work, and Citizenship in an Age of Insecurity in Canada. McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Goldring, Luin, and Patricia Landolt. 2014. "Transnational Migration and the Reformulation of Analytical Categories: Unpacking Latin American Refugee Dynamics in Toronto." Pp. 103-128 in Liliana Sánchez and Fernando Lozano Asencio (eds). The Practice of Research on Migration and Mobilities. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace 14. DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-02693-0. [English version of chapter (and volume) published in Spanish, Goldring & Landolt 2009 in Rivera Sánchez and Lozano Asencio 2009].

Goldring, Luin, and Patricia Landolt. 2013. "The Conditionality of Legal Status and Rights: Conceptualizing Precarious Non-citizenship in Canada.” Pp. 3-27 in Goldring and Landolt (eds.), Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada. University of Toronto Press.

Landolt, Patricia and Luin Goldring. 2013. "The Social Production of Non-citizenship: The Consequences of Intersecting Trajectories of Precarious Legal Status and Precarious Work.” Pp. 154-174 in Goldring and Landolt (eds.), Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada. University of Toronto Press.

Goldring, Luin, and Patricia Landolt. 2012. "Transnational Migration and the Reformulation of Analytical Categories: Unpacking Latin American Refugee Dynamics in Toronto." Pp. 41-64 in Anna Amelina, Devrimsel D. Nergiz, Thomas Faist, and Nina Glick-Schiller (eds.). Beyond Methodological Nationalism: Research Methodologies for Transnational Studies. London/New York: Routledge. [Re-refereed, revised and shortened version of chapter published in Spanish, Goldring & Landolt 2009].

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2009. “Reformulación de las unidades, identidades, temporalidad, cultura y contextos: reflexiones sobre la investigación de los movimientos migratorios.” Pp. 125-161 in Liliana Rivera Sánchez and Fernando Lozano Asencio (eds). Encuentros disciplinarios y debates metodológicos: La práctica de la investigación sobre migraciones y movilidades. México: CRIM-UNAM and Miguel Angel Porrúa.

Landolt, Patricia, Luin Goldring and Judith K. Bernhard. 2009. “Las Organizaciones de Migrantes Latinoamericanos en Toronto: Entre la Política de Base y el Imperativo de la Etnización.” Pp. 203-234 in Angeles Escrivá, Anastasia Bermúdez & Natalia Moraes (eds). Migración y participación política: Estados, organizaciones y migrantes latinoamericanos en perspectiva local-transnacional. Colección Politeya. Córdoba: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. [“Latin American Migrant Organizations in Toronto: Between Grassroots Politics and the Ethnicizing Imperative.” In Migration and political participation: States, organizations and Latin American migrants from a local-transnational perspective.]

Goldring, Luin. 2006. “Latin American Transnationalism in Canada: Does it exist, what forms does it take and where is it going?” Pp. 180-201 (Ch. 10) in Transnational Identities and Practices in Canada. Victor Satzewich and Lloyd Wong (eds). Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Goldring, Luin. 2003. “Gender, Status, and the State in Transnational Spaces: The gendering of political participation and Mexican Hometown Associations.” Pp. 341-358 in Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.). Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Goldring, Luin. 1998. "Having One's Cake and Eating It Too: Selective Appropriation of Ejido Reform in an Urbanizing Ejido in Michoacán." Pp. 145-172 in Wayne Cornelius and David Myhre (eds.). The Transformation of Rural Mexico. La Jolla: Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. U.C.-San Diego.

Chapters in Books (Non-refereed, selected)

Goldring, Luin. 2009. “Migrant Political Participation and Development: Re-politicizing Development and Re-Socializing Politics.” Pp 218-243 In J. DeWind and J. Holdaway (eds.), Migration and Development: Future Directions for Research and Policy. New York: Social Science Research Council. Online document based on conference held 28 February–1 March 2008. essays.ssrc.org/developmentpapers/?page_id=3

Goldring, Luin. 2007. “Movilidad, ciudadanía y nuevas formas de participación política.” Pp. 145-153 in Marcela Ibarra Mateos (ed.). Migración: Reconfiguración transnacional y flujos de población. Puebla, Mexico: Universidad Iberoamericana de Puebla Press.

Goldring, Luin, Patricia Landolt, Judith Bernhard and Martha Barriga. 2006. “Toronto Hispano, Toronto Latino: Latin American Institutional Community Development in the Greater Toronto Area (1973-2005)." Pp. 58-71 in Daniel Schugurensky and Jorge Giginiewicz (eds). Ruptures, continuities and re-learning: the political participation of Latin Americans in Canada. Toronto: OISE, Transformative Learning Centre.

Goldring, Luin. Goldring, Luin. 2005. “Remesas familiares, remesas colectivas y desarrollo: Implicaciones sociales y políticas.” Pp. 67-93 in Raúl Delgado Weis and Beatriz Knerr (eds.). Contribuciones al análisis de la migración internacional y el desarrollo regional en México. Mexico D.F.: Editorial Porrúa.

Goldring, Luin. 1999. “Desarrollo, Migradólares y la Participación “Ciudadana” de los Norteños en Zacatecas” Pp. 77-87 in Miguel Moctezuma and Héctor Rodríguez Ramírez (eds.), Impacto de la Migración y las Remesas en el Crecimiento Económico Regional. México, D.F.: Senado de la República.

Goldring, Luin. 1996. “The Changing Configuration of Property Rights under Ejido Reform.” Pp. 271-287 in Laura Randall (ed.). The Reform of Mexican Agrarian Reform. New York: M.E. Sharp.

Girling, Robert and Luin Goldring. 1983. “U.S. Strategic Interests in Central America: The Economics and Geopolitics of Empire.” Pp. 186-205 in: Stanford Central America Action Network (eds.) Revolution in Central America. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Other Publications

Web Documents/Working Papers/Project Websites/Blogs

Alvarez Velazco, Soledad et al. 2020. “COVID-19 and (Im)Mobility in the Americas.” Website compares experiences and responses to COVID-19, focusing on migrants, borders, state policies and civil society in countries throughout the Americas titled “In/Mobility in the Americas.” Co-author with Tany Basok of section on Canada and first update. The Canadian “node” has since expanded. www.inmovilidadamericas.org/?lang=en

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2018/9. Citizenship and Employment Precarity Project. Website: cep.info.yorku.ca/

Goldring, Luin. 2014. “The alarming new blueprint for Canadian citizenship and immigration policy.” Invited blog. The Broadbent Institute. April 29, 2014. www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/alarming-new-blueprint-canadian-citizenship-and-immigration-policy

Catalyst Centre and Immigrants and Precarious Employment Project. 2009. Immigrants and Precarious Employment, Popular Education Workshop Manual. Manual produced by the Catalyst Centre, Patricia Landolt, and Luin Goldring with material from the INE project. www.arts.yorku.ca/research/ine/public_outreach/materials.html

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2008. “Immigrants and Precarious Employment: Latin American and Caribbean workers in the GTA.” Project website for SSHRC funded INE Research and Public Outreach Project (June). www.yorku.ca/ine/

Research Reports

Lewchuck, Wayne, Stephanie Procyk, Michelynn Lafleche, Diane Dyson, Luin Goldring, John Shields, Peter Viducis. 2018. Getting Left Behind: Who gained and who didn’t in an improving labour market. Toronto: United Way of Greater Toronto and McMaster University. www.pepso.ca

Lewchuck, Wayne, Michelynn Lafleche, Stephanie Procyk, Charlene Cook, Diane Dyson, Luin Goldring, Karen Lior, Alan Meisner, John Shields, Anthony Tambureno, Peter Viducis. 2015. The Precarity Penalty: The impact of employment precarity on individuals, households and communities—and what to do about it. Toronto: United Way of Greater Toronto and McMaster University. www.pepso.ca

Lewchuck, Wayne, Michelynn Lafleche, Luin Goldring, Diane Dyson, Alan Meisner, Stephanie Procyk, Dan Rosen, John Shields, Peter Viducis, Sam Vrankulj. 2013. It’s more than Poverty: Employment Precarity and Household Well-being. Toronto: United Way of Greater Toronto and McMaster University. www.pepso.ca and www.unitedwaytoronto.com/whatWeDo/reports/PEPSO.php

Goldring, Luin and Patricia Landolt. 2009. Immigrants and Precarious Employment in the New Economy. (Introduction to Research Briefs and three Research Briefs) Toronto: Immigrants and Precarious Employment Project. www.yorku.ca/ine/research/publications.html

Much of my research involves collaboration with colleagues and community organizations. I remain committed to making research relevant and accessible to various ‘publics’ and audiences. My recent projects have included the production of research briefs and other clear language materials.

In 2017 I was honoured to received the Faculty of Arts & Liberal Studies Dean’s Award for Distinction in Research, Social Justice.

Current Activities

Track co-chair, “Migration and Refugees.” Latin American Studies Association. (Vancouver, 2021).

Organization of various panels and workshops over the years.


Andil Gosine

Professor

  •  | Health, Nursing and Environmental Studies Building, 224 |
  •    ext. 77984 |
  •    andil@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile


Ratiba Hadj-Moussa

Professor

  •   8th Floor Kaneff Tower |
  •    ext. 77989 |
  •    rhm@yorku.ca |

D.E.A. in Sociology (Diplôme d'études approfondies), area of specialization: Théorie générale, Université de Paris VII-Denis Diderot,
D.E.A. in Art du Spectacle (Graduate Diploma, Diplôme d'études approfondies), area of specialization : Art du Spectacle-cinéma , , Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle,
Ph.D. in Sociology, Université Laval.

Faculty Profile

I am a cultural and political sociologist whose training is in Sociology, Anthropology, Film Studies and Semiotics.

After gaining my PhD, I held a Canada Fellowship, and conducted research on the body in contemporary Western cinema as well as gender relations in Quebec. I also conducted research on secularism and Muslim diasporas, public, publicness and media (in particular satellite television), marginal radical and popular protests as they emerge in the peripheries. I have an extensive research experience and have been a researcher in a variety of research projects in several Canadian universities

My research is interdisciplinary in many important respects. My works bring together four major areas: Cinema/art/media, memory and history, Islam and secularism, and radical/popular expressions, all of which are informed by multidimensional axes including gender, politics, and minoritarian discourses and practices. I write about and reflect on marginal and marginalized issues, people, and spaces, such as women, cinema and visual expressions, ‘the poor”, peripherical geographies, television publics and public spaces, history- memory and alternative memory, and riots, with the aim of contributing to the public exposure of each in a gesture that equally combines an examination of lived realities with theoretical investigation.

Research areas

Sociology of Art and Culture; Political Sociology; Common Cultural Artifacts to Art (Cinema and Music), Visual Culture in general; Memory Studies and Reconciliation, Gender and Post-Colonial Studies; Mediterranean and Maghreb Societies; Diasporic Experiences in Western Contexts, Sociology of Culture and Political Sociology, visual and textual analysis.

Current Research Activities

My current research contributions are threefold, and demonstrate a commitment to collaborative work that engages with other researchers and knowledge holders.

My first area of output is on media and the public sphere; here the main project I have undertaken deals with the public sphere and satellite television in the Maghreb. In this SSHRC-funded project, I investigated and developed an approach to the concepts of “public” and “the political” with regards to the Maghreb, reconsidering the normative assumptions that inform dominant conceptualizations. My contribution is both theoretical and it is informed by postcolonial theory on the public and publicness. This work is original in the way it articulates spaces deemed to be “non-political” (home, street, neighbourhood) versus institutional and public spaces of interaction.

My second area also supported by SSHRC, on radical popular acts—namely, riots—and popular protests from the Maghrebi margins. It has allowed me to develop an approach to the concepts of the “political” and justice that takes its insights from informal local situations. It has helped bring to the fore the questions of political generations and analytical notions of the political.

In the same vein, but this time focussing on the issues of rupture/continuity, I have also co-edited a book entitled Generations and Protests in the Mena and the Mediterranean, with M. Ayyash (Royal Mountain U., Calgary). The book problematizes the much- used expression “new generation” by asking what the reference to the concept of generation brings to scholarly understanding of the protests and the ability to articulate them, as well as analyzing intergenerational relations historically, geographically and politically. The book includes contributions on Egypt, Syria, Israel, Palestine, Greece, Italy, Spain, Algeria, and Tunisia.

My third area of research is related to my interest in history and memory and trauma. Within this theme, I contributed an essay on the framing of the Law on Civil Concord in Algeria (1995–1999) that was implemented during the Algerian civil war between the State and the Islamists (1992–2002), and its devastating consequences on lived memories (2003). Concurrently with the above research, I have participated in the SSHRC Major Collaborative Research Initiative, “Slavery, Memory and Citizenship” (2008–2015) led by Professor P. Lovejoy. Not being a specialist of slavery, my focus was on the complex ways memory and history relate with regards to the construction of post-colonial subjectivities and their effects on lived experiences. On that matter, I explored contemporary Algerian films (2000s) and their noticeable shift to “presentism” and ordinary memory, work I further developed into a refereed article (2014) published in Suffering, Art and Aesthetics, a book I co-edited with my colleague, Professor M. Nijhawan. The collective volume addresses the question of art, violence, suffering, and memory in various contexts (India, Nigeria, Congo Democratic Republic, the Caribbean, Algeria, the Balkans, Cuba, and France/USA), from a multidisciplinary perspective.

The research agenda in this area is the focus on the study of transitional justice and reconciliation processes in the Maghreb, with a particular focus on processes of reconciliation and remembrance in the elaboration of public memory.

Finally, because doing research in authoritarian contexts has specific methodological implications, I am also attentive fieldwork experiences. In this area, I edited Terrains difficiles, sujets sensibles. Faire du terrain au Moyen- Orient et au Maghreb, (Paris, Éditions du Croquant) that is a collection of articles that reflect on “doing” fieldwork in the MENA region.

My approach privileges imagination, originality and rigor. These are not buzz words for me. I work very closely with students while leaving them the necessary liberty to develop their research own project.

Graduate Students Supervised & Postdoctoral Supervison

Post-doctoral Studies

Francesca Maioli, Post-doctoral Fellow, 2010-11, Ph.D. Graduate from University of Milan, Italy (September 2010 – May 2011)

Ph.D.
Amy Colbert, PhD., Social and Political Thought (September 2019, in progress)
Correia, Tylor, PhD., Social and Political Thought (January 2018, in progress)
Tammy Kovich, Ph.D., Gender, Feminist & Women’s Studies, in progress (2014–in progress).
Jan-Therese Mendes, Ph.D., Social and Political Thought, in progress (September 2014–October 23, 2019).
Kathryn Travis, Ph.D. Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, (September 2010 to 2016–)
Markus Kip, Ph.D. Sociology, (September 2008–Feb. 3, 2016, *Recipient of the Graduate Program in Sociology Distinguished Dissertation Award 2017; the Canadian Sociological Association Outstanding Graduating Student Award.)
Jonathan Adjemian, Ph.D. Social and Political Thought. (Summer 2013–5 Feb. 2016).
Steve Ledrew Ph.D. Sociology, 2013 (September 2006–Dec. 2013)
Dolores Figueroa Romero, Ph.D., Sociology, 2011 (Sept 2003–October 2011)
Ali Zaidi, Ph.D., Sociology, 2007 (September 2001–February 2007)
Nancy Cook, Ph.D., Sociology, 2003, nominated for the President Dissertation Prize (Sept. 1999–April 2003).

Master's
Jessica Kohut, M.A., Social and Political Thoughts, (September 2019–in progress)
Amanda Kaminski, M.A, Communications and Culture (September 2016–May 2017)
Rana Sukarieh, M.A. Sociology, 2014 (Sept. 2014–August 2015)
Devin Clancy, M.A. Sociology, 2014 (Sept. 2013–August 2014)
Christopher Zakher, M.A. Sociology, 2014 (Sept 2013–November 2014)
Santiago Rodriguez, M.A. Thesis, Social and Political Thought, 2012. (December 2010–June 4, 2012)
Renée Nadeau, M. A. Sociology, 2011 (January 2009–January 30, 2012)
Isis Portillo, M.A. Sociology, 2008 (Summer 2006–June 2008)
Ayla Amrashi, M.A. Sociology, Sept. 2007 (Spring 2006–2007)
Andrea Reed, M.A. Sociology, 2001 (Spring 1999–Spring 2009)
Tracy Supruniuk, M.A., Sociology, 2000 (Spring 1999–Fall 2000)

I have also served in Masters and PhD committees in Sociology Anthropology, Social and Political Thought, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Fine Arts and Theatre.

Courses Taught

SPT6710. 3.A- SOCI 6597.3/6. A On the Margins and the Political
SOCI 6597.3. A- SSPT. Public Space and Political Culture
SOCI 5995 3.A MA Seminar
GFWS 6907 3.A MA Seminar
SOCI 6150. 3A Textual Analysis
SOCI 6515.3A Diaspora, Hegemony and Culture Identity

I directed several independent readings courses at all levels, and contributed to graduate seminars and workshops in Sociology, Gender Feminist and Women Studies, and Development Studies.

I also taught in other venues at the International level (France, Germany, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Austria).

Books

2019. R. Hadj-Moussa (Ed.), Terrains difficiles. Sujets sensibles : Faire du Terrain au Moyen Orient et au Maghreb. Les Éditions Le Croquant, Paris., 221 pages.

2018. R. Hadj-Moussa, The Public Sphere and Satellite Television in North Africa: Gender, Identity, Critique. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Translated from French (210 pages, follow up with the translation during 2016-2017).

2017. M. Ayyash and R. Hadj-Moussa, (Eds.) Protests and Generations: Legacies and Emergences in the MENA and the Mediterranean. Brill International Publisher, Heiden, 290 pgs.

2015. R. Hadj-Moussa, La télévision par satellite et ses publics au Maghreb: espaces de résistance, espaces critiques, Presses Universitaires de Grenoble, Coll “Communications, médias et sociétés”, 305 pgs.

2014. R. Hadj-Moussa and M. Nijhawan (Eds.) Suffering, Arts and Aesthetics, Palgrave Mcmillan, 226 pgs. (July)
Edited Special Journal Issues (refereed)

2014. R. Hadj-Moussa and S. Wahnich (Eds.) Mondes méditerranéens. L’émeute au coeur du politique. L’homme et la société. Revue internationale de recherches et de synthèses en sciences sociales, 187-188, 226 pgs , 2013) ,

Chapters in Books

2021. Affronter l’injustice dans le Sud algérien : travail, territoire, subjectivité, in I. Melliti (Ed.), Justice sociale, bien commun et légitimités politiques en Méditerranée, IRMC & Traits bleus, Tunis &Paris, in press.

2020. Hadj-Moussa, R. & M.Tilmatine, Cultures minoritaires en Algérie: la Kabylie et le Mzab aux limites de l’impensé politique, in Jacques Guyot (Ed.), Cultures de résistance. Peuples et langues minorisés, Paris, Presses des Mines, 111-127, 17 pgs,

2020. Les protestations populaires au Mzab : Les heurts intercommunautaires au miroir de la génération politique, in A. Kadri (Ed.), Algérie, décennie 2010-2020. Aux origines du mouvement populaire du 22 Février 2019. Paris, le Croquant, 184-241, 2020, 56 pgs.

2019. Fragilité de la recherche : Morale, tabous, police et politique. Introduction, in R. Hadj- Moussa (Ed.), Terrains difficiles. Sujets sensibles : : Faire de la recherche au Maghreb sur le Moyen Orient. Les Editions du Croquant, Paris, 7- 21, 14 pgs.

2019. Observer, décentrer, écrire : Objectiver un terrain en conflit, in R. Hadj-Moussa (Ed.), Terrains difficiles. Sujets sensibles : Faire du Terrain au Moyen Orient et au Maghreb, Les Éditions Le Croquant, Paris, 181-214, 33pgs.

2019. Benromdhane, S. & R. Hadj-Moussa, Médias et justice transitionnelle en Tunisie : Effets de mémoire et construction nationale, in Éric Gobe (Ed.), in Éric Gobe (Ed.), Justice et réconciliation dans le Maghreb post-révoltes arabes, Paris, Khartala, 215-243. 2019, 28 pgs.

2017. The Double Presence: Generation, the Movement of the Unemployed and Southern Peripheries Claims, in M. Ayyash and R. Hadj-Moussa (Eds.), Protests and Generations: Legacies and Emergences in the MENA and the Mediterranean, Brill, 198-223, 25 pgs.

2017. Ayyash, M. and R. Hadj-Moussa Conceptualizing Generations and Protests, in M. Ayyash and R. Hadj-Moussa (Eds.), Protests and Generations: Legacies and Emergences in the MENA and the Mediterranean, Brill, 1-23, 23 pgs,

2016. Hadj-Moussa, R. and S. Ben Romdhane, Legitimate Singularities: Ennahadha in Search of plural Identities?”, in Noha Mellor and Khalil Rinnawi (Eds.), Political Islam: Global Media and the Boundaries of Religious Identity, London: Routledge: 17-33, 16 pgs,

2014. Mourir de partir, horizons d’attente et construction de l’Autre : avec et au-delà des télévisions satellitaires”, in Tristan Matellart (Ed.), Médias et migration dans l’espace euro-méditerranéen, Paris, Mare et Martin, Coll. Media Critic: 51-74, 23 pgs.

2014. Maghrebi Audiences: Mapping the Divide Between Arab Sentiment, Islamic Belonging and Political Praxis, in E. Galal (Ed.), Arab TV Audiences—Negotiating Religion and Identity, Peter Lang, Frankfurt in Main, New York & Oxford: 71-93, 22 pgs.

2014. The Past’s Suffering and the Body’s Suffering: Algerian Cinema and the Challenge of Experience, Suffering, Art, Aesthetics, in R. Hadj-Moussa and M. Nijhawan (Eds.), New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 151-176, 24 pgs.

2014. R. Hadj-Moussa and M. Nijhawan, Introduction: Suffering in Arts: Rethinking the Boundaries, in R. Hadj- Moussa and M. Nijhawan (Eds.), Suffering, Art, and Aesthetics, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 1-22, 22 pgs.

2012. De la sphère publique globale à la sphère publique arabe: Quel(s) publics et quelles mediations, in R. Bourquia (Ed.), Territoires, localité et globalité. Faits et effets de la mondialisation, Paris, L’Harmattan, 21-34, (13 pgs). Reprint of slightly longer article “Beyond the Border...” (2008).

2010. Seeking Liberty and Constructing Identities: Algerian Publics and Satellite Television, in S. Shami (Ed.) Publics, Politics and Participation: Locating the Public Sphere in the Middle East and North Africa, New York, Social Sciences Research Council, 263-298. Reprint with substantive additions and changes to the article “Drifted liberties...” 35 pgs

Refereed Journal Articles

2020. Hadj-Moussa R., and Tilmatine, M. Minorités et politique de la reconnaissance en Algérie. La Kabylie et le Mzab, Confluences Méditerrannée, 114, accepted, 5254 words, in press, Fall.

2021. Derradji, I., and Hadj-Moussa, R. Une si longue absence : Notes sur la politicité de la « rue » en Algérie, Journal Maghreb-Machrek, in press.

2019. Région et génération : Le Sud Algérien et les enjeux de la visibilisation du politique, Année du Maghreb, 21, 165-179, 15 pg.

2019. Youth and activism in Algeria. The question of political generations, The Journal of North African Studies, 26 pgs, DOI: 10.1080/13629387.2019.1665289

2015 Garder l’esprit et oublier la lettre: Penser la sphère publique au Maghreb avec et contre la ‘Grand Theory’ (in Bulgarian), Journal of Bulgarian Sociology, Special Édition, July, 159-173, 14 pgs.

2013. L’Émeute dans le Maghreb. La révolte sans qualité, L’Homme et la société, 187-188, 39- 62, 23 pgs.

2012. Sur un concept contesté: la sphère publique arabe est-elle solide sur terre?, Anthropologie et Sociétés, (MédiaMorphoses: la télévision, quel vecteur de changements?), 36. 12, 161-180, 19 pgs.

2012. Des pauvres de la politique à la politique des pauvres, SociologieS, [journal of the Association internationale des sociologues de langue française], www.sociologies.revues.org/3884,htlm.

2010. Ce que la télévision fait voir. Logique des frontières et enjeux de société en Algérie, SociologieS, www.Sociologies.revues.org/index3221.htlm.

2008. Marginality and Ordinary Memory: Body Centrality and the Plea for Recognition in Recent Algerian Films, Journal of North African Studies, 13, 2,187-199, 12 pgs.

2008. Hadj-Moussa. R. and K. Côté-Boucher, Malaise identitaire: Islam, laïcité et logique préventive en France et au Québec, Cahiers de recherche sociologique, 46, 60-79, 19 pgs. #8594; Special mention as article of interest on multiculturalism issues, Library of Québec Parliament, No 319, January 2009.

Other Publications

Select Papers in Published Conference Proceedings
2019. When communities raise up: Thinking power and the political in the contemporary Algerian Sahara, Council of Social Sciences Conference, Power, Borders and Ecologies in Arab Societies: Practices and Imaginaries”, Beirut, April 12-14, 20 pgs.

2016. ‘Contextes propices’ et médias: À propos d’une relation excentrée, Actes des travaux du Comité de Recherche Sociologie de la communication, Congrès AISLF – CR 33, Montreal, 5 au 7 juillet 2016 : 101-108, 7 pgs.

2011. Riots in the Maghreb: The Web and The Revolt Without Qualities, http://www.eui.eu/DepartmentsAndCentres/RobertSchumanCentre/Research/Internation alTransnationalRelations/MediterraneanProgramme/MRM/MRM2011/ws05.aspx

Reviews
2021. Hadj- Moussa, R. : Thomas Serres’ L’Algérie face à la catastrophe suspendue. Gérer la crise et blâmer le peuple sous Bouteflika ( 1999-2014). Tunis, Paris : IRMC Karthala (préface de Hamit Bozarslan), 2019 : 304 pages, The journal of Arab Studies. (IBN :9079- 2-8111-2626-1), in press.

2016. Hadj- Moussa, R. : Larbi Chouikha, Des séquelles de l’étatisation aux aléas de la transition. La difficile transformation des médias. Des années de l’indépendance à la veille des élections de 2014. Editions Finzi, Tunis, 2015 : 115 pgs, Communication vol. 33/2 | 2015, put online January 27, 2016, https://communication.revues.org/5935

2015. Hadj- Moussa, R. : Anne Lovell, Spefania Pandolfo, Veena Das, Sandra Laugier, Face aux désastres. Une conversation à quatre voix sur la folie, le care et les grandes détresses humaines, Montreuil-sous-Bois, Édition d’Ithaque, 2013, 205 pgs, in Anthropologie et Société, 38, 2, http://www.anthropologie-societes.ant.ulaval.ca/sites/anthropologie- societes.ant.ulaval.ca/files/compte_rendus/lovell_2013_-_hadj-moussa.pdf


photo of Barbara Hanson and a dogBarbara Hanson

Professor

BA Sociology, Western University,
LLB Osgoode Hall Law School,
MA Sociology, Carleton University,
Ph.D. Sociology, University of Toronto

Faculty Profile

Biography

I started university planning to become a lawyer. Around the time I was admitted to law school I attended a graduate course on holism and mental health in the sociology department at the University of Toronto. It grabbed me from the start. I turned down the law spot and became an academic who focused on theory instead. My MA thesis was on nursing homes and PhD on senile dementia. I started as a teacher during decades as a downhill ski instructor and honed my skills with the help of teaching resources support in my first tenure track position at the University of Waterloo. During this position I also became involved in feminist politics. I came to Atkinson College in 1991. My interest in law re-surfaced in 2001. It led me to Osgoode Hall Law School, articling for Legal Aid in Downsview, and being a practising lawyer member of the Ontario Bar. Doing theory has led me into a number of topics, that I continue to articulate including epistemology, methodology, health, aging, gender, religion, law, and animals.

Research areas

Theory, Epistemology, Methodology, Gender, Family, Law, Religion, Fatness, Aging, Health

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on article length pieces that explore epistemological roots of current practices of social research. This involves looking at the interconnections between, religion, science, and academia going back to Ancient and Medieval times.

Graduate Supervision

I enjoy working with graduate students in the areas of Theory, Epistemology, Methods, Gender, Family, Law, Religion, Fatness, Aging, Health.

Graduate Students Supervised

2019– Ramanpreet Bahra PhD (in Progress) Interests are Fat Studies and Racialization

2015– Kelsey Ioannani, PhD (in Progress) “Social Constructions of Fat Women’s Bodies in Medical Interactions”

1998–2008 Andrea Noack, PhD (Completed) Sociology, York University, “Regulating Adolescence Through National Surveys of Youth” Recipient of the Ontario Graduate Assistantship and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Scholarship.

1997–2004 Gail McCabe, PhD (Completed) Sociology, York University, "Reinventing the Crone: Investigating Women’s Aging and Empowerment” Recipient of Ontario Graduate Scholarship, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Scholarship.

Courses Taught

Theoretical Thinking: Selected Topics in Classical and Contemporary Sociological Theory

Sociology of Intimate Relations

Books

2014 What Holism Can Do for Social Theory. New York: Routledge. Routledge Studies in Social and Political Thought (ISBN 978-0-415-74390-7 hbk or 978-1-315-81333-2 e-book).

1999 The Research Process: Creating Facticity. Prospect Heights, Illinois: Waveland Press Inc. (ISBN:1-57766-065-X)

1997 Social Assumptions, Medical Categories, Supplement 1: Advances in Medical Sociology, Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press Inc. Cloth (ISBN: 0-7623-0243-7)

1995 General Systems Theory Beginning with Wholes, Washington: Taylor & Francis. Cloth (ISBN 1-56032-345-0) Paper (ISBN 1-56032- 346-9) In print as of 2011.

Refereed Journal Articles

2018 “Social Constructions of Fatness: Legal Proceedings in Canada as a Case in Point. Disability and Society. United Kingdom. DOI: 10.1080/09687599.2018.1456405.

2015 “An Implicit Religious Reflex to Mechanism and a Holistic Alternative:
Social Theory as Case in Point” Implicit Religion Vol 18 (1), 45-62. doi:10.1558/imre.v18i1.20766.

2015 “Objectivities: Constructivist Roots of Positivism”, Quality and Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Volume 49, Issue 2 (2015), Page 857-865. www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s11135-014-0027-6. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11135-014-0027-6

2010 "Towards a Model of Contextual Emotional Dynamics of Illness: Senile Dementia versus Cancer as a Case in Point" International Review of Modern Sociology 36 (1): 53-73.

2006 “Dog-Focused Law’s Impact on Disability Rights: Ontario’s Pit Bull Legislation as a Case in Point”12: 217-239 Animal Law Review.

2003 “Questioning the Construction of Maternal Age as a Fertility Problem” Health Care for Women International, 24: 166-176.

2001 “Systems Theory and the Spirit of Feminism: Grounds for a Connection” Systems Research and Behavioral Science, 545-556, 1-12.

1997 “Who's Seeing Whom?: General Systems Theory and Constructivist Implications for Senile Dementia Intervention," Journal of Aging Studies, 11(1):15-25.

1991 "Conceptualizing Contextual Emotion: The Grounds for 'Supra-Rationality'" Diogenes, Fall, (no 156): 33-46.

1989 "Definitional Deficit: A Model of Senile Dementia in Context," Family Process, 28(3): 281-289.

1985 "Negotiation of Self and Setting to Advantage: An Interactionist Consideration of Nursing Home Data", Sociology of Health and Illness, 7(1): March, 21-35.

2009/2010 Visiting Scholar, University of San Francisco.

2002/2003 Junior Editor, Osgoode Hall Law Journal, Osgoode Hall Law School.

2001/2002 Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California–San Francisco.

2001/02 Visiting Scholar, Mental Research Institute, Palo Alto, California.

1999–00 Faculty of Graduate Studies Teaching Award, York University, for substantial, significant and sustained excellence, commitment and enthusiasm to the multifaceted aspects of graduate teaching.

1993–94 Visiting Scholar, Institute for Research on Women, Rutgers University.

1993–94 Visiting Fellow, Princeton University.

2008– Lawyer Member—Law Society of Ontario


photo of Merle JacobsMerle Jacobs

Associate Professor
Equity Studies Chair

BA Sociology (Hon), York University (1979),
MA Sociology, York University (1989),
Ph.D. Sociology, York University (2000)
Reg. N. Branson Hospital School of Nursing

Website
Faculty Profile

Biography

I am a faculty member and Chair in the Department of Equity Studies, Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies. I worked as a Nurse Manager in psychiatry while attending York full time for my MA and PhD. As a therapist, I never thought of leaving Mental Health and entering academia. My love for sociology kept me returning to York University and I was able to blend my health background completing my PhD in Women and Work: Staff Nurse Collegiality. The issues of racism and abuse in a predominantly women’s profession, one where I worked as a racialized woman, provided not just the lived experience but allowed me to base my knowledge on research and theory. I have strong commitment to critical race theory, empirical and ethically engaged sociology inspires my research and teaching. I try to cultivate students’ critical thinking skills and sensitize them to the connections between personal experiences and the social world around them. In 2001, I was invited by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT) to join their Graduate Programme prior to working fulltime at York University.

The origin of my research can be traced to my life experiences as an immigrant, and my early professional background in health. Leaving Burma alone, as a teenager on a one-way ticket to the West, heightened my sensitivities to gender inequality, mental health, disruptive family relations due to political violence, human rights and social justice. As a result, my research and scholarship is situated in a) mental health, b) health professionals, c) race and ethnicity in women’s work, and d) my current research: Anglo Burmese culture. The below are areas of importance in building my professional biography.

  1. Ethnic Minorities, Mental Health Services
    During my MA research with Professor A. Richmond and Professor M. Lanphier that ended in 1989, I focused on the mental health system and how services were provided for individuals from minority communities. Both Professor Richmond and Lanphier had a strong interest in refugees, racism, and social interaction. They pointed me to literature that would help me in understanding demography, immigration, and systemic exclusion. These interests were further prompted by my detailed reading of Goffman, Foucault, RD Laing, and Szasz. I found a Eurocentric mental health system that did not deal with race and ethnicity both in services and in professional diagnosis. This led to a research report “Ethnic Minorities within Metro Toronto: Psychiatric Services” which I wrote for a Toronto hospital where I worked as a Nurse Manager.
  2. Disordered Eating
    The mental health work that I was involved in covered Disordered Eating behaviours in women. My data in Disordered Eating in the area of ethnicity and race was completed in 1996. A chapter “Disordered Eating: Culture matters” appeared in my edited book Merle Jacobs (Ed) Critical Readings in Health in September 2008.
  3. Women and Work: Staff Nurse Collegiality
    My research focus on nurses began in 1994 under the supervision of Professor Ray Morris who helped focus questions linking collegiality to social justice and advocacy; thus connecting my research data to my lived experiences. I explored the disconnect between what the staff nurse group perceived as their role, and how the senior team of managers viewed them. This led to the investigation of structures within the profession of nursing and the production of a particular culture within the nursing profession. An inquiry into the relationship between staff nurses and their lack of participation in the professional structures caused me to look at how the lack of participation undermines their position within a female dominated profession.

Building on the above areas led me to engage Critical Human Rights, and my research in health incorporates the Social Determinants of Health as a roadmap when discussing health and rights.

Research areas

Employment equity for racial minorities and aboriginal people: including Social Justice, Setup and Backlash, Nursing and collegiality: Vicarious trauma when working in helping professions; race as a category .

Burmese refugees in Canada: social justice and human rights, relocation, and ties with Burma/ related activist groups in Canada

Current Research Activities

  1. Anglo Burmese culture: a subculture within Burma.
  2. Indigenous ethnicity: The Rakhine.
  3. War and forced migration in the Middle East.

(An Eight-year Internationally collaborative, a multilateral partnership project with Universities in Kurdistan)

“War and forced migration in the Middle East”.
(An Eight-year Internationally collaborative, multilateral partnership project)
The team from DES include Professor M. A. Jacobs, Professor Fereydoon Rahmani, and Professor L. A. Visano. (on hold due to COVID 19)

Phase 1) assessing the life conditions of refugees and Internally Displace People (IDP) within the Iraqi Kurdistan camps and shelters. In this part, the quality of life indicators, the indicators of a dignified and just-able life condition are going to be evaluated, while the effect of services provided to the migrants and refugees within the camps also will be investigated.

Phase 2) Canadian refugees and immigrants originated from the Middle East including Iraq would be analysed for their life conditions and how their resettlement is being experienced after fleeing from their homes and shelters. Has the new sanctuary been able to provide relief from the trauma or has added new suffering to their lived experience?
Presented at:
2019—Conference Paper: Title: Traumatic stress, Vicarious/Secondary traumatisation, and Compassion fatigue. International Conference in Duhok East Meets West" at the Institute of Psychotherpy apd Psycho-Traumatology (IPP)In Duhok in collaboration between Duhok University June 23rd and 24th (and University of Tubingen, Baden Wurtemberg Germany).

2018—Paper: “War and forced Migration—Middle East refugees” : A research project. The 4th World Kurdish Congress (WKC2018) November 22–24, 2018. Washington, D.C., United States

The research on Anglo Burmese culture will be published in a Book titled—Anglo Burmese Culture: Letters from my mother.

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the area health, critical human rights within equity issues, Anti Racism (intersectionality.)

Graduate Students Supervised

York University:
Sociology

2019– Sharon Henry PhD
2015–2016 R. Ryemes–MA
2011–12 Paulette Campbell–MA
2011–13 Shirin Khayambshi–MA
2010–2013 Carlos Torres PhD

PublicPolicyAdministration

2016 Genevieve Ford–MA
2015 Georgette Morris–MA

Interdisciplinary Studies

2019 Abraham Abbey–MA
2019 Catherine Mutune
2017–2019 Ame Khin–MA
2017 Marcell McBean–MA
2015–2016 Loferne Cuffy–MA
2013–2016 Caroline Suchit–MA
2013–2015 Shila Khayambashi
2013 Kamalkali Mukherjee

Graduate Administrative Committee Ed.D. OISE. University of Toronto
2011—PhD Candidate–Allison Glaser Proposal: thesis on nursing and legislation. Supervisor Jamie Magnusson. Department of Theory and Policy Studies OISE University of Toronto

2010–2014—PhD Canadidate–Nadia Prendergast Proposal: "Identifying the dialectic of the ideal type and multiculturalism policies within the praxis of Canadian Nursing" Department of Theory and Policy Studies OISE University of Toronto

2009—MA Candidate Sunila Rajiv Kalkar. Proposal: Knowledge and Attitudes of parents related to HPV Vaccine. Committee Supervisor

2006—PhD Candidate Roderick A. Ryner Proposal: Structered Inequality In Professional Social Work Education In Ontario: Aboriginal Access From Social Service Worker (SSW) To Bachelor Of Social Worker Programs. Committee: Supervisor: Linda Muzzin, Michael Skolnik, Department of Theory and Policy Studies OISE University of Toronto

2008–12 May—Candidate Jeffery Squires. Proposal: Ecosystems approach to manage biomedical waste. Supervisor: Murray Haight Graduate Administrative Committee–University of Waterloo

Courses Taught

Graduate Courses
2001–2011 OISE, University of Toronto Theory and Policies Studies in Education
Graduate course: Issues in Medical / Health Professions Education

Books—Authored

2007 The Cappuccino Principle: Health, Culture and Social Justice in the Workplace. Ontario: de Sitter Publication (pages 231)
2008 Women’s Work: Racism and Trauma. Toronto: APF Press (pages 164)
2013 Women’s Work: Racism Revisited. Toronto: APF Press (pages 232) (refereed)
2015 Social Dislocation to Geographical Dislocation: Trauma & Resilience (Ed). Toronto, APF Press. (refereed)
2015 Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano. Toronto. APF Press (pages 524) (refereed)
2017 Race In-Equity: Intersectionality, Social Determinants of Health, & Universal Rights
August 2017 (Ed) with Ouedraogo, Awalou. Toronto. APF Press (refereed)
2021 (forthcoming) Anglo Burmese Culture: Letters from my mother. Toronto APF Press (referred)

Books—Edited

2013 Social justice and human rights: inequalities relating to health status (Ed) with L. A. Visano. Toronto: APF Press. (pages 246)(refereed)
2011 Social Dislocation, Trauma, and the Lived Experience. Toronto, APF Press
2010 The Professionalization of Work (Eds) with Stephen Bosanac .Ontario: de Sitter Publications. 2nd Edition
2008 Critical Reading in Health (Ed) Toronto: APF Press.
2007 Justice Health and Culture (Ed) Toronto: Thomson Nelson.
2006 A Reader in Social Justice: Local and Global (Ed) Ontario: Thomson Nelson.
2006 The Professionalization of Work (Eds) with Stephen Bosanac .Ontario: de Sitter Publications.
2002 Is Anyone Listening?: Women, Work, and Society (Ed)Toronto: Women’s Press

Reader for Courses

2011 The Intersections Collections, Health and Equity, Pearson Custom Sociology: Pearson Learning Solutions
2006 A Reader in Social Justice: Local and Global. Toronto: Thomson Nelson.
2006 Sociology: Families and Social Change. Toronto: Thomson Nelson.
2005 Intersections: Readings in Sociology. Customized Reader Canada: Pearson Custom Publishing

Refereed Journal Articles

2010 “Speaking, Hearing and Understanding the Stories We Hold as Health Care Providers.”
Patricia McGillicuddy, Tracy Johnson, Phyllis Jensen, Margaret Fitch, Merle Jacobs. Canadian Social Work Journal Volume 12(1).

Chapters in Books

Self-edited
2017 Social Inclusion = Social Determinants of Health. Where is Race and Racism?: In Race In-Equity: Intersectionality, Social Determinants of Health, & Universal Rights (Ed) with Awalou Ouedraogo (pp 33-61) Toronto. APF Press.

2017 Health Inequities: Can you advocate? : In Race In-Equity: Intersectionality, Social Determinants of Health, & Universal Rights (Ed) with Awalou Ouedraogo (pp 93-108) Toronto. APF Press.

2017 Developing countries and In-Equity. In Race In-Equity: Intersectionality, Social Determinants of Health, & Universal Rights (Ed) with Awalou Ouedraogo (pp 205-238) Toronto. APF Press.

2017 Is there Equity in Multiculturalism. (with Awalou Ouedraogo). In Race In-Equity: Intersectionality, Social Determinants of Health, & Universal Rights (Ed) with Awalou Ouedraogo (pp 267-302) Toronto. APF Press.

2015 Introduction:can health be used to understand Equity?(with L. A. Visano) in Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano.(pp1-31) Toronto. APF

2015 Social Determinants of Health: social inclusion and social capital. ? in Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano.(pp-32-63) Toronto. APF

2015 Food, Nutrition, Undernourished:it is all about Equity in Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano.(pp162-181) Toronto. APF

2015 Development and Underdevelopment:factors in Righting Humanity. in Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano.(pp182 - 208) Toronto. APF

2015 Health inequities & health policies:can you advocate?(with L.A. visano) in Righting Humanity: In My/Our Time (Ed) with L. A. Visano.( 484 -516) Toronto. APF

2015 Social Dislocation, Adaptability, and Resilience in (Ed) Merle A. Jacobs. Social Dislocation to Geographical Dislocation: Trauma & Resilience. (pp14-24) Toronto, APF Press.

2015 Contextualising Cultural Dislocation in (Ed) Merle A. Jacobs. Social Dislocation to Geographical Dislocation: Trauma & Resilience. (pp36-48) Toronto, APF Press.

2015 Asylum seekers: Is Canada a safe space? in (Ed) Merle A. Jacobs. Social Dislocation to Geographical Dislocation: Trauma & Resilience. (pp146-154) Toronto, APF Press

2013 Introduction: Status as the Signified Locus of Injustice in (Ed) L. A. Visano & Merle Jacobs ‘Social Justice and Human Rights: inequalities relating to health status.’ (pp. 1-15) Toronto, APF Press

2013 Our Health Status relates to Social Justice and Human Rights in (Ed) L. A. Visano & Merle Jacobs ‘Social Justice and Human Rights: inequalities relating to health status.’ (pp. 17-38) Toronto, APF Press

2013 Cultural Accounts of Mental Illness: No help from Multiculturalism in (Ed) L. A. Visano & Merle Jacobs ‘Social Justice and Human Rights: inequalities relating to health status.’ (pp. 57-78) Toronto, APF Press

2011 Social Rights, Human Rights, and Health Status in(Ed) Merle Jacobs ‘Social Dislocation, Trauma, and the Lived Experience.’ (pp. 6-35) Toronto, APF Press.

2011 Social Isolation OR A lack of Community Empowerment in (Ed) Merle Jacobs ‘Social Dislocation, Trauma and The Lived Experience.’ (pp. 62-77)Toronto, APF Press.

2011 Psychological Trauma From Internal Wars: An Outsider’s/Insider’s View. Tina Motavalli and Merle Jacobs in (Ed) Merle Jacobs ‘Social Dislocation, Trauma, and The Lived Experience. Toronto. (pp. 202-216) Toronto, APF Press.

2010 Understanding Bureaucracies (with Claudio Colaguori) in Canadian Society: Global Perspectives,( Eds) McCauley, Timothy P. and Janice Hill. (pp. 95-103) Ontario, de Sitter Publications

2010 Equity and Work in The Professionalization of Work (Eds) with Stephen Bosanac. Ontario, de Sitter Publications

2010 Nursing, A Pink Collar Ghetto? From Semi-Professional to Professional. In Merle Jacobs & Stephen Bosanac (Eds) ‘The Professionalization of Work.’ (pp 123-143). Ontario: de Sitter Publications. REPRINT

2008 Race is a determent of Health in Canada. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) Critical Readings in Health. (pp 49-72). Toronto: APF Press.

2008 Disordered Eating: Culture Matters. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) Critical Readings in Health. (pp 183-212). Toronto: APF Press.

2007 Race is a determent of health. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) Justice, Health and Culture. (pp 36 – 46). Ontario: Thomson Nelson.

2007 Nursing, A Pink Collar Ghetto? From Semi-Professional to Professional. In Merle Jacobs & Stephen Bosanac (Eds) ‘The Professionalization of Work.’ (pp 123-143). Ontario: de Sitter Publications.

2006 Social Determinants of Health: A roadmap to Social Justice. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) A Reader in Social Justice: Local and Global. (pp 235-252). Toronto: Thomson Nelson.

2002 Creating Understanding from Research: Staff Nurses’ Views on Collegiality. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) ‘is anyone listening? Women, Work and Society.’ (pp 295-314). Toronto: Women’s Press.

2002 Undertaking Advocacy. In Merle Jacobs (Ed) ‘is anyone listening? Women, Work and Society.’ (pp 336-344). Toronto: Women’s Press

Other Publications

Published Professional Reports
2005 Implementing Accountability For Equity And Ending Racial Backlash (Eds) Hagey, R., Jacobs. M., Turrittin J., Prudy, M., Lee, Ruth., Cooper Brathwaite A., & Marianne Chandler. Toronto: Canadian Race Relation Foundation

2010–2011 delegate Toronto and York Region District Labour Council
2007–2008 Co-chair, Race Equity Caucus
2020 Consultant and Director Outreach Oasis of Praise
2013–2015 Chair – Canadian Friends of Burma
2013- Member and BOD - Canadian Friends of Burma
2010–2012 Member, Central LIHN IHSP Health Equity Advisory Network
2007–09 Chair, The Marcus Garvey Centre for Leadership and Education
2008 Governance Committee, York Central Hospital
2006 Quality and Performance management Committee. York Central Hospital
2004–06 Community member, Strategic Planning Committee. York Central Hospital

Service is an active and sustained engagement, developing collegial relationships. I serve at the departmental, faculty, and university levels which keeps me engaged with staff, administrators and faculty colleagues. As well, I believe in community and professional service beyond the University. In these activities, I seek to give back to the community for its betterment. For example:

Keynote Addresses
2009 “Women, Equity, and Advocacy: Building Bridges.” 20th Annual General Meeting. Sexual Assault and Violence Intervention Services of Halton. June

2009 “Health is a Human Right.” Keynote Address. The Peel fountain of Wisdom Senior Services. Canadian Coptic Centre. Peel. ON. February 04


Carl James

Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Ann KimAnn H. Kim

Associate Professor

MSW Social Work, University of Toronto, (1997),
MA Sociology, Brown University, (2003),
PhD Sociology, Brown University, (2006).

Faculty Profile
Website

I joined York as an assistant professor in 2006 after completing the doctorate in Sociology at Brown University on Halloween 2005, where I was also a Population Studies and Training Center (PSTC) trainee, and after working as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. Before pursuing doctoral studies, I spent several years in the non-profit sector, working locally and internationally, in Scarborough, Ottawa, Sydney (Australia), and London (UK).

Broadly, my work spans the migration field and intersects with race and ethnicity, and urban studies. I value quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods in my research and I would describe my orientation as being driven by interesting questions and relevant meso/micro-level theory more so than by any singular paradigm or methodology. I am a social demographer and a migration scholar, and I have built my career at York as a Korean/Asian Canadian Studies specialist. Currently, I am the Director of the Resource Centre for Public Sociology in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Associate of the York Centre for Asian Research.

Research areas

My research interests fall into three main areas: migration studies; race and ethnicity; and urban sociology. Among other topics, I have examined the experiences of Korean immigrants with respect to ethnic entrepreneurship, later life migration, living arrangements, new destinations, Korean transnational families, and aging and later life. More recent projects include the motivations and integration experiences of North Korean migrants in Canada and the racialization of Asian international students. Co-edited volumes include Korean Immigrants in Canada: Perspectives on Migration, Integration and the Family (University of Toronto Press 2012) and Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students in Canada, Their Families, and Structuring Institutions (University of Toronto Press 2019).

Selected Research Grants

  • 2019–2023—Asian International Students to Canadian Universities: Examining the Racialization of Chinese, Indian and Korean Students in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg, SSHRC Insight Grant (Co-I)
  • 2017–2019—When Roots/Routes Matter: The Appearance and Disappearance of Asylum Seeking Families from the DPRK in Canada, Child and Youth Refugee Research Coalition (CYRRC) Funded by SSHRC: Broader Economic, Social and Political Factors Cluster Grant (PI)
  • 2012–2014—Insights from Canada’s Settlement Industry: Exploring Agency Data on Temporary Migration, SSHRC Insight Development Grant (PI)
  • 2012–2013—Outward and Upward Mobilities: Families from South Korea in an Era of Transnationalism (Co-Chair, Workshop 27-28 September 2012, York University) SSHRC Connections Grant; Academy of Korean Studies; Population Change and Lifecourse Cluster Knowledge Mobilization Grant
  • 2011–2014—An Analysis of Public and Private Discourses of Education Migration in Canadian Schools: A Case Study of South Korean Families, SSHRC Standard Research Grant (Co-I)
  • 2009–2012—Development, Migration Strategies and Prospects for Social Integration: Understanding Contemporary Transnationalism Among South Korean Families, SSHRC Standard Research Grant (PI)
  • 2009–2012—“Worked to Death”: Gendered-Racialized Dimensions of Economic Security for Later Life Canadians, SSHRC Standard Research Grant (Co-I)

Graduate Supervision

I advise students with interests in the areas of migration, settlement and integration, refugees, ethnicity and ethnic identity, panethnicity and race, Korean diaspora, Asian Canadian studies, international students and temporary residents, and quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods.

Courses Taught

I teach in the areas of migration, methods, statistics, and urban sociology.

Books

Kim, Ann H. and Min-Jung Kwak (eds). 2019. Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students, Their Families and Structuring Institutions. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (February)

Noh, Samuel, Ann H. Kim and Marianne S. Noh (eds). 2012. Korean Immigrants in Canada: Perspectives on Migration, Integration and the Family. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 312 pages. (September)

Kim, Ann H. 2009. The Social Context of Residential Integration: Ethnic groups in the United States and Canada. El Paso, TX: LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC. 217 pages.

Chapters in Books

Kim, Ann H. and Reem Attieh and Timothy Owen. 2019. “Barriers to Knowledge on International Students and a Potential Opportunity.” Chapter 4 in Ann H. Kim and Min-Jung Kwak (eds), Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students, Their Families, and Structuring Institutions. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Kim, Ann H., Min-Jung Kwak, Eunjung Lee, Wansoo Park, and Sung Hyun Yun. 2019. “Legal Status and School Experiences for Families with Young Students.” Chapter 11 in Ann H. Kim and Min-Jung Kwak (eds), Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students, Their Families, and Structuring Institutions. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Kim, Ann H. and Gunjan Sondhi. 2019. “Explaining International Student Mobility to Canada: A Review.” Chapter 3 in Ann H. Kim and Min-Jung Kwak (eds), Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students, Their Families, and Structuring Institutions. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Mandell, Nancy and Ann H. Kim. 2017. “Intergenerational Relations in Later Life Families” Chapter 3 in Ronald J. Burke and Lisa M. Calvano (eds), The Sandwich Generation: Caring for Oneself and Others at Home and at Work. Cheltenham UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited.

Kim, Ann H. 2015. “Structuring Transnationalism: The Mothering Discourse and the Educational Project” Chapter 12 in Guida C. Man and Rina Cohen (eds), Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work, and Identity. Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

Mandell, Nancy, Katharine King, Valerie Preston, Natalie Weiser, Ann H. Kim, Meg Luxton. 2015. “Transnational Family Exchanges in Senior Canadian Immigrant Families.” Chapter 4 in Guida C. Man and Rina Cohen (eds), Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work, and Identity. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Preston, Valerie, Natalie Weiser, Katharine King, Nancy Mandell, Ann H. Kim and Meg Luxton. 2014. “Worked to Death: Diverse Experiences of Economic Security among Older Immigrants.” Chapter in Kenise Murphy Kilbride (ed), Future Immigration Policies: Addressing Challenges and Opportunities During Integration into Canada. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc. (pp.67-84).

Mandell, Nancy, Katharine King, Natalie Weiser, Ann H. Kim, Lawrence Lam, Meg Luxton, and Valerie Preston. 2014. “Building Bridges with Senior Immigrant Groups: Do CAP protocols work?” Chapter 7 in Rachel Berman (ed), Corridor Talk: Canadian Feminist Scholars Share Stories of Research Partnerships. Toronto: Inanna Publications.

Kim, Ann H. 2013. “Retiring Immigrants: Korean Seniors’ Lives After Migration to Canada.” Chapter in Thomas Klassen (ed), The Aging Tiger: South Korea’s Mandatory Retirement Predicament. New York: Routledge.

Kim, Ann H., Sung Hyun Yun, Wansoo Park, and Samuel Noh. 2012. “Explaining the Migration Strategy: Comparing Transnational and Intact Migrant Families from South Korea to Canada.” Chapter in Pyong Gap Min (ed), Koreans in North America: Their Twenty-First Century Experiences. New York: Lexington Books.

Kim, Ann H. and Chedly Belkhodja. 2012. “Emerging Gateways in the Atlantic: The Institutional and Family Context of Korean Migration to New Brunswick.” Chapter 5 in Korean Immigrants in Canada: Perspectives on Migration, Integration and the Family. Samuel Noh, Ann H. Kim and Marianne S. Noh, eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Kim, Ann H., Marianne Noh and Samuel Noh. 2012. “Introduction: Historical Context and Contemporary Research.” Chapter 1 in Samuel Noh, Ann H. Kim and Marianne S. Noh (eds) Korean Immigrants in Canada: Perspectives on Migration, Integration and the Family. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Mujahid, Ghazy, Ann H. Kim and Guida C. Man. 2011. “Transnational Intergenerational Support: Implications of Aging in Mainland China for the Chinese in Canada.” Chapter 14 in Huhua Cao and Vivienne Poy (eds) The China Challenge: Sino-Canadian Relations in the 21st Century. Ottawa, ON: University of Ottawa Press. 177-198.

Kim, Ann H. 2010. “Filial Piety, Financial Independence and Freedom: Explaining the Living Arrangements of Older Korean Immigrants.” Chapter 19 in Douglas Durst and Michael MacLean (eds) Diversity and Aging Among Seniors in Canada: Changing Faces and Greying Temples. Calgary, AB: Detselig Enterprises Ltd. 387-408.

Refereed Journal Articles

Preston, Valerie, Ann H. Kim, Samantha Hudyma, Nancy Mandell, Meg Luxton, and Julia Hemphill. 2013. “Gender, Race, and Immigration: Aging and Economic Security in Canada.” Canadian Review of Social Policy 68/69: 90-106.

Kim, Ann H. and Michael J. White. 2010. “Panethnicity, Ethnic Diversity and Residential Segregation.” American Journal of Sociology 115(5): 1558-1596 (March).

Kim, Ann H. and Monica Boyd. 2009. “Housing Tenure and Condos: Ownership by Immigrant Generations and the Timing of Arrival.” Canadian Journal of Urban Research 18(1): 47-73 (Summer)

Other Publications

Kim, Ann H. 2018. “Korean Ethnicity and Asian American Panethnicity.” Entry in the Companion to Korean American Studies. Joo, Rachael Miyung and Shelley Sang-Hee Lee (eds). Brill. Chapter 14.

Director, Resource Centre for Public Sociology (link: resource-centre.soci.laps.yorku.ca/), 2019-2021

Faculty Associate, York Centre for Asian Research (link: ycar.apps01.yorku.ca)

Most of my own public work is with the local Korean Canadian community in Toronto and the Asian Canadian Women’s Alliance. I am a big believer in community-based and community-engaged research and I often collaborate with community organizations and non-academic partners in various ways, including in research, publications, and events.


Fuyuki Kurasawa

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Laura J. Kwak

Assistant Professor

BA Honours, Sociology, Queen's University,
MA, Gender Studies/Political Studies, York University,
PhD, Sociology and Equity Studies, University of Toronto.

Faculty Profile
Primary Website
Secondary Website

Biography

My research commitment is to investigate evolving forms of racial governmentality and questions about racial justice in a world where post-racial discourses not only persist alongside explicit racial violence but also make their very conditions possible.

My research and teaching areas are in the nexus of sociology of race, sociology of law, and Canadian studies. My research and teaching challenge common sense ideas about race, class, and gender and approach these not as categories of difference and accommodation but as sites of social and political critique. I conduct interdisciplinary research on processes of racialization, representation, governmentality, and the law.

Research areas

Racialization and the Law; Governmentality; Post-racialism; Critical Race Theory; Social Justice; Incorporative Politics; Critical War Studies; Parliamentary Debates; Archival Research

Current Research Activities

Race and Representation in Canada’s Parliament:
The inclusion of racialized politicians has become a key feature of liberal democracies. For instance, the 2008 election of United States President Barack Obama was, for many people, a hopeful sign of the emergence of a “post-racial” society; that is, a society that has, through the inclusion of formerly excluded racialized populations, transformed into an exceptionally progressive one that is “past” racism. Similarly, in 2015, when newly elected Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walked to Rideau Hall for his swearing-in ceremony with his gender-balanced, racially-diverse Cabinet behind him, this was presented as a transformation of the Canadian political scene. However, Trudeau’s attention to representation does not depart from earlier periods. In the post-Second World War period, there has been a trend towards amending historical injustices through the political incorporation of previously excluded populations. Nor does Trudeau’s attention to representation necessarily depart from the Harper government’s diversity practices (2006–15). For instance, leading up to the 2011 federal election, Conservative leaders insisted that “new Canadians,” specifically Chinese and South Asians, are “new Conservatives” who do not make demands on government and whose values align naturally with the CPC’s social conservatism. While a few scholars contested the CPC’s claim that racialized immigrants became Conservative in 2011, Canadians have widely assumed that CPC efforts to appeal to select racialized groups reflected a genuine commitment to race equity. That is, the inclusion of racialized MPs relies on a narrative of progress that defines our national identity and reshapes the parameters of how we understand and debate racialization and racism.

This project investigates whether and how the inclusion of racialized MPs into Canada’s main political parties [Conservative Party of Canada, Liberal Party of Canada, and New Democratic Party] matters. Based on an in-depth study of the parliamentary activities, speeches, and contributions to legislative debates of racialized MPs between 2006–2019, it examines how MPs from historically under-represented populations contribute to policies affecting these groups, focusing on the ways in which the racialized politicians alter and/or allow the intensification of existing policies and/or dominant political discourses or ideologies.

Memorialization of War: Nation-building through Settler Colonial and Imperial Militarism:
As part of my research on race and the politics of incorporation, my current research also explores travelling narratives of Canadian military intervention. I am interested in the subjectivities produced and military interventions authorized through memorialization practices. Specifically, I examine the timely memorialization of the Korean war and narratives circulated about rescue from communism/terrorism, indebtedness to the Canadian military, and the construction of the Republic of Korea as “a beacon of hope for the people of Afghanistan”. Through a critical approach that places discrepant archives in relation to one another, I explore how the nation relies on settler colonial militarism as a blueprint for its imperial militarism.

Selected Research Grants

2020 Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Insight Development Grant—“Race and Representation in Canada’s Parliament, 2006–2019” (Principal Investigator)

Graduate Supervision

I am accepting graduate students for supervision in the area of the sociology of race and sociology of law who are pursuing topics from a perspective that aligns with a critical race approach.

Graduate Students Supervised

Paul Centorame. TBD. (MA Graduate Program in Socio-Legal Studies).

Tanya Pabla. TBD. (MA Graduate Program in Socio-Legal Studies).

Tamayah Edwards. August 2020. Crime and Race: Unmasking the falsehood of equality in the courtroom. (MA Graduate Program in Sociology)

Courses Taught

SOSC 3391 Social Diversity and the Law
SOSC 3395 Legal Geographies
SOSC 4366 Race, Law, and the Politics of Representation
SLST 6000 Law and Social Theory

Books

Modernity’s Indebted Subjects: Incorporative Politics and Race-Making in a Settler Colonial Subimperial Nation. UBC Press Law and Society Series. (Manuscript in progress)

Refereed Journal Articles

Kwak, L.J. 2020. Problematizing Canadian Exceptionalism: A study of right-populism, white nationalism and Conservative political parties. Governing the Political: Law and the Politics of Resistance. Oñati, Spain: Oñati Socio-legal Series. Pp. 1166-1192.

Murdocca, C. and L.J. Kwak. 2020. Introduction. Governing the Political: Law and the Politics of Resistance. Oñati, Spain: Oñati Socio-legal Series. Pp. 1075-1083.

Kwak, L.J. 2019. ‘New Canadians are New Conservatives’: Race, Incorporation and Achieving Electoral Success in Multicultural Canada. Ethnic and Racial Studies Vol. 42(10), pp. 1708-1726.

Kwak, L.J. 2018. Still Making Canada White: Racial Governmentality and the ‘Good Immigrant’ in Canadian Parliamentary Immigration Debates. The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, Vol. 30(3), pp. 447-470.

Kwak, L.J. 2017. Race, Apology and the Conservative Ethnic Media Strategy: Representing Asian Canadians in the 2011 Federal Election Campaign. Amerasia Journal Vol. 43(2), pp. 79-98.

Chapters in Books

Kwak, L.J. 2017. Asian Canada: Undone. In R. Coloma and G. Pon, (eds.). Asian Canadian Studies Reader. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Pp. 352-362.

Pon, G., R. Coloma, L.J. Kwak, and K. Huynh. 2017. Asian Canadian Studies Now: Directions and Challenges. In R. Coloma and G. Pon, (eds.). Asian Canadian Studies Reader. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp 3-28.

Kwak, L.J. Introduction to Narratives of Torture/Spectacles of Terror. In S. Razack and S. Perera, (eds.). At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour on Terror. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Pp. 19-22.

Book Review Co-Editor, Lateral: Journal of the Cultural Studies Association (2020–present)


Chris Kyriakides

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Bonita Lawrence

Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Emily LaxerEmily Laxer

Assistant Professor

MA Sociology, McGill University,
PhD Sociology, University of Toronto.

Twitter: @emily_laxer
Faculty Profile
Website

Biography

I have been a member of the Graduate Department in Sociology at York University since 2018. Prior to this, I received my Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2015 and subsequently held a SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan.

My research bridges the sociological study of politics, nationalism, immigration and gender to examine how contests for political power shape the incorporation of ethno-religious minorities in largescale immigration countries. In previous work, I focused on the impact of party political debates over Islamic religious coverings in circumscribing the boundaries of nationhood in France and Canada (including Québec). As of June 2020, I am principal investigator of the SSHRC Insight Development Grant “Politicians Against the Law: Populist Representations of Rights and Legality in Contemporary Canadian Politics”.

My research has been published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, Nations and Nationalism, the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Recherches Sociographiques, Comparative Studies in Society and History, as well as in edited volumes. My book—Unveiling the Nation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Québec (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019)—was awarded the John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award from the Canadian Sociological Association in 2020.

Research areas

My primary areas of specialization are citizenship & nationalism; immigration; populism; religion; and gender.

Current Research Activities

In addition to my current SSHRC-funded project (described below), I am actively involved in two ongoing collaborative research projects. The first, with Dr. Jeffrey Reitz (Sociology, University of Toronto) and graduate student Jessica Stallone (Sociology, University of Toronto), uses qualitative interview data to compare the gendered effects of Islamophobia among hijab-wearing women in France, Québec, and English-Canada. The second project probes the role of religion in contemporary populisms. In collaboration with Dr. Efe Peker (Sociology, University of Ottawa), this research compares the use of religious themes and imagery by populist movements in six countries: Brazil, France, India, Québec, Turkey, and the United States

Selected Research Grants

As of July 2020, I am the principal investigator on a new research project, “Politicians Against the Law: Populist Representations of Rights and Legality in Contemporary Canadian Politics”, which has been awarded a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (effective through 2022). The study explores the hypothesis that assaults on the rule of law are among the key strategies that contemporary populists deploy as they work to gain resonance and siphon votes from mainstream political parties. This hypothesis derives from my prior published research on the politics of secularism in France and Québec. Through that research, I discovered that campaigns to restrict Islamic religious coverings in the public sphere hinge in significant part on populist claims that the executive and legislative branches of the state – rather than the judiciary – are the only legitimate arenas in which to advance the interests of the “people”.

With the help of one Graduate Assistant from York University’s Faculty of Graduate Studies, this project will specify the relationship between populist political movements and articulations of rights and legality in three Canadian provinces: Ontario, Québec, and Alberta. All three provinces have seen the recent election of a government that invokes populist themes in order to confront constitutional barriers to its legislative agenda. In Ontario, this strategy was evidenced when Conservative Premier Doug Ford promised in 2018 to invoke the Notwithstanding Clause to circumvent a court decision striking down his government’s Bill 5, which diminished the size of Toronto’s City Council from forty-seven wards to twenty-five. In the same month, the newly elected Coalition avenir Québec (CAQ) party in Québec announced that it too would invoke the Notwithstanding Clause, to override a court challenge against its Bill 21, which the National Assembly adopted in 2019 to prohibit religious symbols among many public servants. Populist orientations to the rule of law also buttress Alberta’s emerging “Wexit” movement. Fueled by discontent over the limited representation of Western constituencies in the federal government elected in 2019, the group has taken aim at minority rights and is threatening Albertan secession from Canada. Though not in government, the populist ideals behind “Wexit” have influenced the legislative agenda of the governing United Conservative Party.

Using these three cases as empirical entry points, the project will draw on textual evidence – namely party political documents, parliamentary debates, and newspaper coverage of party activities – as well as interviews with key party political representatives to answer the following questions: (1) What main discourses do contemporary populists use when framing rights and legality? (2) How do those discourses contribute to populists’ larger strategic objectives? (3) What impacts do populist discourses of rights and legality have on the broader political landscape?

Graduate Supervision

I am currently open to working with graduate students whose research agendas address questions related to citizenship & immigration, populism, immigration, religion, and gender.

Graduate Students Supervised

While I currently sit on several Ph.D. dissertation committees, I have not yet supervised a Ph.D. dissertation project.

However, I enjoyed supervising the Research Review Paper by one Master’s student, Anna Benker, whose project was entitled “A Case for Qualitative Methodologies of Anti-Muslim Attitudes”. This project was defended in August, 2019.

Courses Taught

Undergraduate (Glendon Campus):
Gender, Politics, and Culture
Department of Sociology, Glendon Campus, York University
Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Fall 2020 (in French)

Principles of Sociology
Department of Sociology, Glendon Campus, York University
Fall/Winter 2018-2019, 2019-2020, 2020-2021

Graduate (Glendon and Keele Campuses):
Diaspora, Hegemony, and Cultural Identity
Department of Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Keele Campus, York University
Fall 2020

State and Society
Master’s in public and International Affairs, Glendon Campus, York University
Fall 2019

Books

Laxer, Emily. 2019. Unveiling the Nation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Québec. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.
www.mqup.ca/unveiling-the-nation-products-9780773556294.php

Select Refereed Journal Articles

Laxer, Emily, Jeffrey Reitz, and Patrick Simon. Online, 2019. “Muslims’ political and civic participation in France and Canada: testing models of participation”. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2019.1620418

Laxer, Emily. 2018. “‘We Are All Republicans’: Political Articulation and the Production of Nationhood in France’s Face Veil Debate”. Comparative Studies in Society and History, 60(04): 938-967.
www.cambridge.org/core/journals/

Laxer, Emily and Anna C. Korteweg. 2018. “Party Competition and the Production of Nationhood in the Immigration Context: Particularizing the Universal for Political Gain in France and Québec”. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 41(11): 1915-1933 (lead article).
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01419870.2017.1324168

Reitz, Jeffrey, Patrick Simon and Laxer, Emily. 2017. “Muslims’ Social Inclusion in Canada, Québec and France: Does National Context Matter?” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 43(15): 2473-2498.
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2017.1313105

LLaxer, Emily, Rachael D. Carson and Anna C. Korteweg. 2014. “Articulating Minority Nationhood: Cultural and Political Dimensions in Québec’s Reasonable Accommodation Debate”. Nations and Nationalism 20(1): 133-153.
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/nana.12046

Laxer, Emily. 2013. “Integration Discourses and Generational Trajectories of Civic Participation in Multi-Nation States: A Comparison of the Canadian Provinces of Québec and Ontario”. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 39(10): 1577-1599.
www.tandfonline.com/

Chapters in Books

Laxer, Emily, Jeffrey Reitz, and Patrick Simon. Forthcoming, 2020. “L’intégration des musulmans en France, au Québec, et dans le restant du Canada”, Étudier la religion au Québec. Regards d’ici et d’ailleurs, Québec: Presses du l’université du Québec.

Laxer, Emily. 2017. “Gender Inequality and the Role of Power, Politics and Representation.” In Robert Brym, ed. Income Inequality and the Future of Canadian Society. Toronto: Rock’s Mills Press.

Boyd, Monica and Laxer, Emily. 2011. “Voting Across Immigrant Generations”. In Lorne Tepperman and Angela Kalyta (eds). Reading Sociology. Toronto: Oxford Press.

Other Publications

Laxer, Emily. 2019. Review of Politicizing Islam: The Islamic Revival in France and India by Z. Fareen Parvez. Social Forces 98(2): 1-3

Laxer, Emily. 2017. Review of Veiled Threats: Representing the Muslim Woman in Public Policy Discourses by Naaz Rashid. Gender & Society 31(3): 424-426.

John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award, Canadian Sociological Association (2020), for Unveiling the Nation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Québec. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Finalist, Prix de la Présidence de l’Assemblée Nationale du Québec (2020), for Unveiling the Nation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Québec. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Canadian Sociological Association (since 2009), co-chair of the Political Sociology and Social Movements Research Cluster (since 2017)
American Sociological Association, Political Sociology and International Migration (since 2010)
Council for European Studies (since 2012)
Social Science History Association (since 2013)
Société québécoise pour l’étude de la religion (since 2017)

In addition to publishing in academic journals and edited volumes, I have made it a priority to take my research beyond the academy, primarily through op-ed articles highlighting how legislative measures to restrict Muslim women’s veiling practices undercut existing policy commitments to pluralism and inclusion in Québec. I also appeared on TVO’s The Agenda with Steve Paikin in October 2019 to unpack the implications of Canada’s federal election results for Québec’s ongoing religious signs debate.

Interview on The Agenda with Steve Paikin, on “The Return of the Bloc Québécois”. TVO, October 31, 2019.

“Québec’s ban on religious symbols will only embolden the far-right”, Globe and Mail, op-ed, June 27, 2019.

“Linking Québec’s Values Charter to French Secularism is a Deception”, Globe and Mail, op-ed, December 18, 2013.

“Québec’s Charter Has Disrupted 50 Years of Nationalist Dialogue”, Globe and Mail, op-ed, September 25, 2013.


Muyang Li

Assistant Professor

B.A., Communication, Communication University of China, (2010),
M.Sc., New Media, Chinese University of Hong Kong, (2011),
Ph.D., Sociology, University at Albany, (2020).

Twitter: @muyangli_soc

Faculty Profile

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at York University. I am also a faculty associate at the York Centre for Asian Research (2020-) and a member of the Gender Domain of the 100 Questions Initiative at the GovLab at NYU (2019-). Before coming to Canada, I studied in mainland China, Hong Kong, and the U.S. I received my Ph.D. in sociology from the University at Albany (2020).

With an interdisciplinary background in communication and sociology, my research agenda is driven by two core interests. One is digital media’s interaction with democracy and social life, and the other is the Internet’s role in shaping gender representation. I am especially interested in probing the media’s role in shaping democracy and social life in different social contexts. A major part of my research aims to explore the interaction between digital media, society, and the nation-state. My recent project on digital authoritarianism reveals how western/liberal democratic values weaken the legitimacy of authoritarian regimes in the social media era, and how the authoritarian state strategically reframes the democratic values through ideological campaigns on social media. My comparative studies (Communication Review, 2017; Research in Comparative and International Education, 2018) concentrated on how media systems and social contexts are intertwined in shaping the public discourses and personal choice, probing 1) how media systems shape the news framing in China, U.S., and the U.K.; and 2) how the policy, culture, and media usage impact Chinese and Korean international students’ educational adaptation in the receiving country. I also conducted research projects examining how gender is presented in the digital public. One of my studies (Information, Communication and Society, 2020) discovers that social media has aggravated gender bias in China, not through under- but through overrepresentation of women.

I am strongly dedicated to synthesizing my research skills and experiences to promote diversity and equality. With my skills in computational methods and interest in gender studies, I have participated in the Gender Domain of the “100 Questions Initiative.” This project is launched by the Governance Lab at NYU, aiming to identify and solve the most critical societal questions through data collaboratives.

Research areas

Digital Sociology, Cultural Sociology, Authoritarianism, Gender, Computational Text Analysis, Mixed-Methods

Current Research Activities

My current research focuses on digital media’s impact on state-society relations. I am working on several projects studying authoritarianism in the digital age, tracking how the authoritarian regime expands hegemony through domestic and international digital media to compete with liberal ideas. One project aims to map the negotiation between the Chinese state and the public in defining democracy through social media. The preliminary finding suggests that the authoritarian regime survived the ideological crisis in the social media era by combining repressive and hegemonic strategies. Another project on the authoritarian regime’s information campaign aims to reveal how Chinese officials “tell China’s story” on Western social media. By mapping the narrative features and network patterns of coordinated attempts by the authoritarian regime, this project shows how Chinese officials promote and manipulate certain information on foreign social media without using censorship, as it usually does in domestic media platforms.

I am also working on two collaborative projects that analyze the media discourse of COVID-19. In the first project, we depict how Western mainstream newspapers frame the spatial and cultural delimitation of COVID-19 as it spread from China to the rest of the world. Specifically, we aim to understand how frames of cosmopolitanization interacted with alternative frames, such as nation-state centralism, and how such relations varied across Western countries. The second project focuses on the rising of anti-Chinese sentiment and rhetoric. We investigate how English media used the anti-China phrase in the coverage of the COVID-19. Was the COVID-triggered wave of anti-Chinese racism merely a reaction to the fact that the COVID-19 originated in a Chinese city? Or did it reflect anti-China sentiment against the backdrop of China’s rise and perceived threats to the Western (at least in the English-speaking world) way of life?

Selected Research Grants

  • 2019–2020, Dissertation Improvement Award, National Science Foundation (NSF), $14,831 (Co-PI: Muyang Li)
  • 2019–2020, Doctoral Fellowship, Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, $20,000

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the area of media, culture, and politics. I also accept graduate students who conduct studies using computational methods and/or text analysis.

Courses Taught

SOCI 4930 Sociology of Science and Technology

Refereed Journal Articles

Li, M. & Luo, Z. (2020). The ‘Bad Women Drivers’ Myth: The Overrepresentation of Female Drivers and Gender Bias in China’s Media. Information, Communication and Society, 23(5), 776-793. www.tandfonline.com/eprint/

Chung, A. Y., Chen, K., Jung, G., & Li, M. (2018). Thinking Outside the Box: The National Context for Educational Preparation and Adaptation among Chinese and Korean International Students. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), 418-438. 10.1177/1745499918791364

Jacobs, R. N., & Li, M. (2017). Culture and comparative media research: Narratives about Internet privacy policy in Chinese, U.S., and U.K. newspapers. The Communication Review, 20(1), 1-25. 10.1080/10714421.2016.1271641

  • Meadows Award for Excellence in Research, University at Albany (2020)
  • Honorable Mention for the Best Project Award, the 3rd Summer School on Methods for Computational Social Science – Methods for Analyzing Multimedia Data (2019)
  • Dissertation Research Fellowship Award, University at Albany (2019)
  • Karen R. Hitchcock New Frontiers Fund Award, University at Albany (2019)
  • Liska Dissertation Research Award, University at Albany (2019)

Meg Luxton

Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Guida Ching-Fan ManGuida Ching-Fan Man

Associate Professor

  •  | Kaneff Tower 612, |
  •    ext. 30269 |
  •    gman@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile

Biography

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, and a Research Associate at the Centre for Feminist Research (York University), and the York Centre for Asian Research.

Having grown up in Hong Kong and pursued higher education in the US and Canada, my research foci has evolved from my ontological and epistemological journey as a Chinese woman and a feminist scholar who is committed to social justice and equity issues, and whose research interests intersect women’s work in the home and in the labour market, family and gender relations, and immigrant and diasporic communities in the context of globalization, economic restructuring, and transnationalism. The theoretical underpinning of my work has been informed by feminist theories and methodologies, with an intersectionality gender, race, and class analysis. I have always involved the collaboration of community agencies in my studies, with the attention that the research is for, about, and with immigrant communities, and in particular, immigrant women in these communities. More recently, my research has been focusing on eldercare work within immigrant families.

Research areas

Immigration and transnational migration, social reproduction, gender and work, immigrant families and communities, immigrant women.

Current Research Activities

Together with a team of graduate research assistants, I am currently embarking on a new SSHRC funded project in examining the social reproductive processes in transnational migration, focusing on the eldercare work of Chinese immigrant women professionals in Canada. We have started recruiting and conducting virtual in depth interviews. Once we have completed interviews with 40 immigrant women, we will use NVIVO to analyze the interview data, using a gender, race/ethnicity, and class intersectional analysis.

At the same time, as the principal investigator or co-investigator, I continue to work on three other research projects: 1) Stalled Mobility? Income Inequality and Intergenerational Relationships Among Newcomer South Asian and Chinese Households in York Region; 2) Developing a Comprehensive Understanding of Elder Abuse Prevention in Immigrant Communities; 3) Women’s Work is Never Done: Eldercare Within Chinese Families in Hong Kong.

As well, I am the collaborator of two large SSHRC Partnership Grants (see Research Grants below with an asterisk).

Selected Research Grants

2020–23 Principal Investigator, SSHRC Insight Grant # 435-2020-1356 ($ 99,980) project entitled “Transnational Migration and Social Reproduction: Eldercare Work of Chinese Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada”.

*2020-27 Collaborator, SSHRC Partnership Grant # 895-2020 1022 ($2.5 mill.) project entitled “Inclusive Communities for Older Immigrants (ICOI): Developing multi-level, multi-component interventions to reduce social isolation and promote connectedness among older immigrants in Canada.”

2019-22 Co-Investigator (with Nancy Mandell, PI; Amber Gazso; and Lawrence Lam), project on “Stalled Mobility? Income Inequality and Intergenerational Relationships Among Newcomer South Asian and Chinese Households in York Region.” ($39,201), sub-grant from SSHRC Research Grant (BMRI) Building Migrant Resilience in Cities/Immigration et résilience enmilieu urbain.

*2019-22 Collaborator. SSHRC Partnership Grant (2.5 mill.) “Migration and Resilience in Urban Canada: Discovering Strengths and Building Capacity”. (PI: Valerie Preston)

2016-22 Co-investigator, SSHRC Insight Grant #435-2016-1318 ($233,053) on “Developing a Comprehensive Understanding of Elder Abuse Prevention in Immigrant Communities.”

2018-20 Principal Investigator, YUFA Sabbatical Leave Fellowhship ($10,458) on “Women’s Work is Never Done: Eldercare Within Chinese Families in Hong Kong”.

2016-19 Principal Investigator, SSHRC Small Grant and LA&PS Minor Research Grant ($5,500) on “Eldercare Within Chinese Immigrant Families”.

2009-15 Principal Investigator, SSHRC Standard Research Grant ($100,488). Project on
“Transnational Migration Trajectories of Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada:
Strategies of Work and Family”. (2010-11 parental leave)

2006-09 Co-Investigator. SSHRC Standard Research Grant. ($110,091). Project on
“Professional Immigrant Women Navigating the Canadian Labour Market: A Study in
Adult Learning”.

2005-06 Co-Investigator, CERIS/SSHRC Research Grant. ($14,000). Project on “Learning to
be Good Citizens: Informal Learning and the Labour Market Experiences of Professional Chinese Immigrant Women”.

2004-05 Principal Investigator, SSHRC Small Grant and Minor Research Grant. York University ($4,700). Project on “Chinese Immigrant Women in Toronto: Precarious Work, Precarious Lives”.

2000-04 Co-investigator, SSHRC Strategic Research Grant. ($600,000). Dept. of Geography, Queen’s University. Project on “Transnational Citizenship and Social Cohesion: Recent Immigrants from Hong Kong to Canada”.

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision.

Courses Taught

Current

2020– Doctoral dissertation Supervisor, Keefer Wong (Sociology)
2017– Doctoral dissertation committee, Munjeera Jefford (Social and Political Thought)
2020– MRP committee. MA (Sociology): Abby Abidogun, Implications of the nuclear family dynamic on black single mothers' work and family life
2017– MRP committee. MA (Sociology): Babalola Fadipe, The Neo-colonial Legacy In the Rise and Persistence of Pentecostalism in Nigeria

Past
Doctoral supervision

2012–18 Doctoral dissertation committee. Ph.D. (GFWS): Conely De Leon, Transnational Filipino Kin Networks and the Politics of Care and Emotional Labour. Defended June, 2018. Academic Position since July 2018: Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sociology, Ryerson University.
2015–16 Doctoral dissertation committee. Ph.D. (Sociology): Anke Allspach, Modern
Imperialism: Canadian Renditions to Torture and the production of Impunity for Sovereign Racialized State Violence
. Defended May 2016. Position in May 2016: Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Sociology, Ryerson University.

Doctoral comprehensive committee member

2019–20 Doctoral comprehensive committee. Bianca Gomez, Ph.D. program (Sociology). Defended July 2020
2016–17 Doctoral comprehensive committee. Ph.D. student (Sociology): Suzanne Spiteri
2013–14 Doctoral comprehensive committee. Ph.D. candidate (Sociology): Rehanna Siew Sarju

Doctoral dissertation examiner

2019 Dean’s Representative, Doctoral thesis defense (Sociology): Ishrat Zakia Sultana, Rohingya Youth in Bangladesh: Owning Rohingya Identity in Disowning Spaces. Defended: March 28.
2016 Internal-External Examiner, Doctoral thesis defense (Geography): Marshia Akbar
Identities and Experiences of Bangladeshi Immigrnat Women Operating Businesses in Toronto. Defended: Aug. 17.

MA supervision

2019–20 MRRP Supervisor, Victoria Ogley (Sociology), Exploring the Return Movement of Children of Hong Kong Immigrants Through the Lens of Transnationalism, Social and Cultural Reproduction, and the Intersections of Class, and Race/Racialization. Defended April 2020.
2016–18 MA Thesis Committee. MA student (Interdisciplinary Studies): Thrmiga Sathiyamoorthy, Understanding Social Inclusion from the Perspectives of Tamil Seniors and Service Providers in the Greater Toronto Area. Defended June 2018. Position in July 2018: Researcher, Mount Sinai Hospital.
2016 MRP thesis committee. MA student (GFWS): Jenna Baraschuk-Modha. Defended.
2013–15 MRP committee. MA student (Sociology): Betty Ann Henry, Stepping out of Place The Socio-Economic Marginalisation of Fat Black Women (fBw) and its Relevance for Contemporary Labour Practices. Defended 2015. Current position: Doctoral student, York sociology.
2013–14 MRP committee. MA student (Sociology): Nadia Nassar, Mixed Metaphors: An exploration of discourses surrounding ‘multiracial’ people in Canada. Defended 2014.
2012 Internal Examiner, MA thesis Defence on Young Adult Carers in Canada: How Caregiving Shapes Their Educational and Work Opportunities by Samantha Hudyma, Graduate Program in Sociology, York University. Defended: Sept. 14.

Graduate Courses Taught

Sociology 6613 3.0 Immigration and Incorporation

Sociology 6614 3.0 Migration and Transnationalisms

Books

Man, Guida & R. Cohen, eds. 2015. Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work. and Identity. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 356pp.

Select Refereed Journal Article

Man, Guida. 2019. “Social Reproduction and Transnational Migration: Navigating Institutional Processes in Childcare by Women in Middle-Class Mainland Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada”, in Canadian Ethnic Studies/etudes ethnique au Canada, Vol. 51 no. 3, 117-136.

Guruge, Sepali, Souraya Sidani, Atsuko Matsuoka, Guida Man, and Diane Pirner. 2019. “Developing a comprehensive understanding of elder abuse prevention in immigrant communities: a comparative mixed methods study protocol”, BMJ Open, Jan. 21.
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022736

Man, Guida and E. Chou. 2017. “Transnational Familial Strategies, Social Reproduction, and Migration: Chinese Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada”, Journal of Family Studies, p. 1-17. www.tandfonline.com/eprint/

Das Gupta, Tania, Guida Man, Kiran Mirchandani, and Roxana Ng. 2014. “Class Borders: Chinese and South Asian Canadian Professional Women Navigating the Labor Market”, in Asian Pacific Migration Journal (APMJ) 23 (1): 55-83.

Man, Guida C. 2012. “Working and Caring: Examining the Transnational Familial Practices of Work and Family of Recent Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada”, in The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Volume 6, Issue 3 pp.199-212.

Preston, Valerie, A. Kobayashi, and Guida Man. 2006. “Transnationalism, Gender, and Civic Participation: Canadian Case Studies of Hong Kong Immigrants”, in Environment and Planning A, Vol. 38 (9) September, pp. 1633-1651.

Man, Guida. 2004. “Gender, Work and Migration: Deskilling Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada”, in Women’s Studies International Forum, Special Issue on ‘Out of Asia: Skilling, Re-skilling and Deskilling of Female Migrants,’ edited by P. Raghuram, and E. Kofman. Elsevier Ltd. Vol. 27, Issue 2, June-July, pp. 135-148.

Man, Guida. 2002. “Globalization and the Erosion of the Welfare State: Effects on Chinese Immigrant Women”, in Canadian Woman Studies/les cahiers de la femme, special issue on ‘Women, Globalization and International Trade’, Vols. 21/22, Nos. 4/1, p.26-32.

Preston,Valerie and Guida Man. 1999. “Employment Experiences of Chinese Immigrant Women: An Exploration of Diversity,” in Canadian Woman Studies/les cahiers de la femme, v. 19, no. 3, Fall, p.115-122.

Man, Guida. 1997. “Women, Work and Migration: Interviewing the Everyday Experience of Women in Middle-Class Hong Kong Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada.” In Bulletin of the International Oral History Journal/Boletin de la Asociacion Internacional de Historia Oral, Vol. 1, No. 2, Dec. (In English, Portuguese and Spanish).

Man, Guida. 1997. “Women, Work and Migration: Interviewing the Everyday Experience of Women in Middle-Class Hong Kong Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada.” In Historia, Antropologia y Fuentes Orales, No. 17, p.7-22. (In Spanish).

Man, Guida. 1995. “The Experience of Women in Chinese Immigrant Families: An Inquiry into Institutional and Organizational Processes.” In Asian and Pacific Migration Journal, Vol. 4, No. 2-3, p.303-325.

Chapters in Books

Man, Guida and Elena Chou. 2019. “Migration, Gender Relations and the Negotiation of Identity Amongst Chinese Professional Immigrant Women in Canada”, in Negotiating Canadian Identities (chapter 5), edited by Jessica Li, McGill-Queen's University Press, pp. 94-116.

Man, Guida and Elena Chou. 2019. “Global Restructuring, Gender, and Education Migration: Chinese Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada”, in Outward and Upward Mobilities: International Students in Canada, Their Families, and Structuring Institutions, edited by Ann H. Kim and Min-Jung Kwak. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, pp. 177-196.

Man, Guida and Elena Chou. 2017. “Gendered Practices of Middle-Class Chinese Immigrant Women Professionals”, in L.L. Wong, ed., Trans-Pacific Mobilities: The Chinese and Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press, pp. 222-236.

Man, Guida. 2015. “Maintaining Family Through Transnational Strategies: The Experience of Mainland Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada” In Engendering Transnational Voices: Studies in Family, Work, and Identity, edited by G. Man and R. Cohen, 33-51. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Man, Guida. 2014. “Transnational Mothering: Examining Transnational Strategies of Mainland Chinese Immigrant Families”, in Gender and Family in East Asia, Routledge Research on Gender in Asia Series, pp. 141-159. N.Y.: Routledge Pub.

Man, Guida. 2014 (also 2009). “From Hong Kong to Canada: Immigration and The Changing Family Lives of Middle-Class Women from Hong Kong,” in Family Patterns, Gender Relations, edited by B. J. Fox, 4rd Edition, pp. 477-495.Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Man, Guida. 2013. “Families in the Chinese Diaspora: Women’s Experience in Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese Transnational Immigrant Families in Canada”, in International Handbook of Chinese Families, edited by Chan Kwok-bun, New York: Springer, chap. 9, pp. 157-168.

Mujahid, Ghazy, Ann H. Kim and Guida C. Man. 2011. “Transnational Intergenerational Support: Implications of Aging in Mainland China for the Chinese in Canada”, in The China Challenge: Sino-Canadian Relations in the 21st Century, edited by Huhua Cao and Vivienne Poy. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, chap. 14. pp.183-204.
www.chinaeam.uottawa.ca/Canada-China/

Man, Guida. 2010. “Global Migration, Gender, and Inequality: Chinese Immigrant Women’s Employment Experience in Canada”, in Canadian Society: Global Perspectives, edited by T. McCauley, Toronto: De Sitter Press, pp.129-142.

Man, Guida. 2009. “From Hong Kong to Canada: Immigration and The Changing Family Lives of Middle-Class Women from Hong Kong,” in Family Patterns, Gender Relations, edited by B. J. Fox, 3rd Edition. Toronto: Oxford University Press, pp. 477-495. (Reprinted from 2nd ed.)

Man, Guida. 2007. “Racialization of Gender, Work, and Transnational Migration: The Experience of Chinese immigrant women in Canada”, Racism and Anti-Racism in Canada, edited by Sean Hier and Bolaria Singh, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, pp. 235-52.

Man, Guida. 2006. “Globalization and the Erosion of the Welfare State: Exploring the Experience of Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada”, in Canadian Woman Studies: An Introductory Reader, 2nd ed., pp. 306-316. Toronto: Inanna Publications and Education Inc. (Revised from Guida Man, “Globalization and the Erosion of the Welfare State: Effects on Chinese Immigrant Women”, in Canadian Woman Studies/les cahiers de la femme, special issue on ‘Women, Globalization and International Trade’, Vols. 21/22, Nos. 4/1, p.26-32, 2002).

Man, Guida. 2004. “Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada: Examining Local and Transnational Networks”, in Chinese Women and their Network Capital, Asian Women and Society Series, edited by K.E. Kuah-Pearce, pp. 44-69. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish International.

Man, Guida. 2003. “The Experience of Women in Recent Hong Kong Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada.” In Voices: Essays on Canadian Families, edited by M. Lynn. Second Edition, pp.221-244. Toronto: Nelson Publishing.

Man, Guida. 2002.“Negotiating New Lives: The Experience of Immigrant Women from Hong Kong and China in Canada”, in Essays on Ethnic Chinese Abroad Vol. II, Women, Political Participation and Area Studies, edited by Tsun-Wu Chang & Shi-yeoung Tang, pp.39-56. Taipei: Overseas Chinese Association.

Man, Guida. 2001. “From Hong Kong to Canada: Immigration and The Changing Family Lives of Middle-Class Women from Hong Kong,” in Family Patterns, Gender Relations, edited by B. J. Fox, pp.420-440. 2nd Edition. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Man, Guida. 1998. “Effects of Canadian Immigration Policies on Chinese Immigrant Women (1858-1986)”, in Asia-Pacific and Canada: Images and Perspectives, pp.118-133. Tokyo: The Japanese Association for Canadian Studies.

Man, Guida. 1997.“Women's Work is Never Done: Social Organization of Work and the Experience of Women in Middle-Class Hong Kong Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada”, in Advances in Gender Research, edited by V. Demos and M. Texler Segal, Vol. 2., pp.183-226. Greenwich: JAI Press Inc.

Man, Guida. 1995. “The Experience of Women in Recent Hong Kong Chinese Immigrant Families in Canada.” In Voices: Essays on Canadian Families, edited by M. Lynn, 1st ed., pp.271-300. Toronto: Nelson Publishing.


Nancy Mandell

Professor

B.A. (Honours Sociology), University of Toronto,
B. Ed., University of Toronto,
M.A. (Sociology), Carleton University,
Ph.D. (Sociology), Northeastern University.

Faculty Profile
Website

Biography

I am a Professor in the Department of Sociology and a member of the Graduate Programs in Sociology and Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies. I am also a member of the Centre for Feminist Research and the York Centre for Asian Research.

After finishing my BA and BEd from the University of Toronto, I completed an MA at Carleton University in medical sociology, focusing on Canadian health care policy. I then moved to Boston and did my PhD in Sociology at Northeastern University. My doctoral supervisor, Blanche Geer, introduced me to pragmatism and the Chicago School of Sociology, specifically qualitative methods and the philosophy of George Herbert Mead. I used Mead extensively in my PhD thesis as a theoretical framework for my qualitative study of the ways young children construct meanings in day care settings. I returned to Toronto to take up a short-term teaching position at the University of Toronto and then moved to York University, teaching full-time at Atkinson College and eventually I moved into a tenured position on the Keele Campus. I have built a career on examining the intersection of gender, race and class at different stages of the life course with particular emphasis on childhood, midlife and later life. My most recent work has concentrated on settlement and integration among later life immigrants.

Research areas

Gender, intergenerational relations, migration, critical gerontology and qualitative research methodologies.

Current Research Activities

My research and teaching interests include qualitative methods, gender, aging, care work, intergenerational relations and immigrant settlement and migration. I have written book chapters, articles and research reports on feminist approaches to paid and unpaid work, family relations, later life women, economic insecurity among newcomer families, university-to-work transitions of international students, and settlement and integration challenges facing newcomers. I recently completed a major project with IRCC on challenges facing newcomer seniors in Ontario which involved interviews in the GTA, Windsor and Ottawa. I am now working on a major project examining the economic, cultural and social factors shaping migration, settlement and resilience among Canadian newcomers.

Selected Research Grants

2018 Principal Investigator, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Partnership Grant Building Migrant Resilience in Cities, “Stalled Mobility: Income Inequality and Intergenerational Relationships Among Newcomer South Asian and Chinese Households in York Region”, $39,201.00

2016 Co-investigator, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Partnership Grant “Migration and Resilience in Urban Canada: Discovering Strengths and Building Capacity”, $2.5 million.

2016 Co-investigator, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) "Immigrant Women, Youth, and Seniors: A Research and Knowledge Mobilization Project on the Settlement Outcomes-Services Nexus." $400,000.00.

2015 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Connections Grant “Resisting Inequality/Enabling inclusion: An India-Canada Comparison”, $24,994.00.

2009 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Standard Research
Grants competition, Ottawa, Ontario. Nancy Mandell, Ann Kim, Meg Luxton
and Valerie Preston, ‘Worked to Death’: Gendered-Racialized Dimensions
of Economic Security for Later Life Canadians”, $98,248.00

Community-Academic Research Partnerships

I have been involved in many collaborative partnerships with social policy and community agencies, jointly producing research reports, conferences and workshops and in publications. During my time as Director of the Centre for Feminist Research, I initiated numerous conferences on different feminist topics – motherhood, spirituality, global perspectives on women’s rights- and published a workbook on protocols for engaging in community-academic research partnerships. My most recent community-academic research partnership brings together a regional government and six community agencies across Ontario in investigating digital literacy among newcomer seniors.

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the areas of family, migration, community-academic research projects, schooling and critical gerontology.

Graduate Students Supervised

  • Lois Kamenitz (Faculty of Education: “It wasn’t the end that I was so much interested in, it was the journey”: Stories of women who pursued a PhD in later life)
  • Khin May-Kyawt (Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies: Empowered Mothering and Employment: A Study of Myanmar Diasporic Mothers in Greater Toronto Area)
  • Yue Teng (Sociology: Work-Family Conflict in Canadian Families—Gender Inequality Over the Life Course)
  • Theodora Kyriakakos (Sociology: Barriers to Mental Health Services among Chinese Immigrants in Canada)
  • Vivian Stamatopoulus (Sociology: Young Carers in Canada)

Courses Taught

Soci 6060 3.0 Qualitative Methods of Research
Soci 6008 3.0 Qualitative Methods of Research
WMST 6007 3.0 (Y) Feminist Research Colloquium
WMST 6008 6.0 Feminist Methodologies and Research Methods.

Recent publications address issues of rising income inequality in Canada, economic security among senior immigrant families, intergenerational transnational exchanges in later life families, the role of the family and community in immigrant settlement, and feminist critiques of aging bodies, and university-to-work transitions for international students.

Mandell, N., J. Borras, J. Phonepraseuth and L. Lam. University-to-work transitions: Experiences of Chinese and South Asian international students, in Leaving to learn: Mapping the place of resilience in the journeys of international students to Canada, edited by S. Ghosh, L. Veronis and M. Walton-Roberts, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, forthcoming.

Mandell, Nancy and Lois Kamenitz. 2021. Women moving into later life: aging bodies, changing identities, Chapter 5 in Valerie Zawilski (ed) Body studies in Canada: Critical approaches to embodied experiences, Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Mandell, N. and J. Hemphill. 2020. Intergenerational Relationships and exchanges, The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology.

Mandell, N., J. Hemphill, J. Phonepraseuth, and J. Borras. 2019. Settlement experiences of recently arrived seniors: Final Report, Immigration and Refugee Citizenship Canada, Ottawa, ON;

Mandell, N., J. Borras, J. and J. Phonepraseuth. 2018. Recent Canadian immigrant seniors: Settlement experiences and services: A knowledge synthesis report, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Ottawa, ON

Mandell, N., L. Lam, J. Borras, and J. Phonepraseuth. 2018. Living on the margins: Economic security among senior immigrants in Canada, Special Issue on Social Inequality & the Spectre of Social Justice, Alternate Routes, 38-64

Mandell, N. and V. Stamatopolous. 2018. Caregiving and support for older adults, pp. 199-215 In Gazso, A. and Kobayashi, K. (Eds.). Continuity and innovation: Canadian families in the new millennium, Toronto: Nelson.

Mandell, N. and A. Kim. 2017. Intergenerational relations in later life families, pp. 62-78 In Burke, R. J. and Calvano, L.M. The sandwich generation: Caring for oneself and others at home and at work, London: Edward Elgar, UK.

Mandell, N. and Johnson, J. (Eds).2016. Feminist issues: Race, class and sexuality. 6th edition, Toronto: Pearson.

Mandell, N., King, K., Preston, V., Weiser, N., Kim, A. H., & Luxton, M. 2015. Transnational family exchanges in senior Canadian immigrant families, pp. 75-96 In G. Man & R. Cohen (eds.), Engendering transnational voices: Studies In family, work and identity. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Preston, V., Weiser, N., King, K., Mandell, N., Kim, A.H. and Luxton, M. 2014. “Worked to death”: Diverse experiences of economic security among older immigrants”, pp 67-86 in Immigrant integration: Research implications for future policy edited by Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Toronto” Canadian Scholars Press.

Mandell, N. and King, K. 2014. Building fridges with senior immigrant groups: Do CAP protocols work?, pp.124-140 in R. Berman (ed). Corridor Talk, Toronto: Inanna Publications. Press.

Mandell, N. and King, K. 2014. Emotional labour and feeling rules in academic community research projects”, pp.7-38 in R. Berman (ed). Corridor Talk, Toronto: Inanana Publications.

Mandell, N. and Whittington-Walsh, F. 2014. Building bridges across sectors: Academic-community research protocol, pp.96-123 in R. Berman (ed), Corridor Talk, Toronto: Inanana Publications.

Preston, V., Kim, A.H., Hudyma, S., Mandell, N., Luxton, M. and Hemphill, Gender, race, and immigration: Aging and economic security in Canada, Canadian Review of Social Policy / Revue canadienne de politique sociale, 90-106.

Mandell, N. and Duffy, A. (Eds). 2011. Canadian families: Diversity, conflict, and change, 4th ed. Toronto: Thompson Nelson.

Duffy, A. and Mandell, N. 2011. Poverty in Canada, pp. 96-104 in R.J. Brym (ed.) Society in Question. 7th Edition. Toronto: Thomson Nelson.

Mandell, N. and Wilson, S. 2011. Intergenerational care work: Mothering, grandmothering and eldercare, pp. 30-46 in C. Krull and J. Sempruch (Eds). AlLife in balance? Reopening the family-work debate, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Mandell, N., Duffy, A. and Wilson, S. 2010. From ‘little woman’ to ‘little old lady’: Feminist perspectives on women and aging, pp. 197-218, In N. Mandell (Ed). Feminist issues: Race, class and sexuality, 5th edition, Toronto: Pearson.

Mandell, N., Wilson, S. and Duffy, A. 2008. Connection, compromise and control: Canadian women discuss midlife, Toronto: Oxford University Press.


photo of Aryn MartinAryn Martin

Associate Professor & Associate Dean

  •   Vari Hall, 2060 / 230 York Lanes (FGS) |
  •    ext. 55015 / |
  •    aryn@yorku.ca |

B.Sc.H. Life Sciences, Queen’s University, (1996),
M.E.S. Environmental Studies, York University, (1999),
PhD. Science & Technology Studies, Cornell University, (2006).

Faculty Profile
Academia.edu

I am a sociologist and historian of the 20th century and current life sciences. My primary scholarly identity is as a practitioner of Science & Technology Studies, especially including its feminist variants.

I completed a BScH in Life Sciences at Queen’s University, with an honours thesis on chromosomal mosaicism. Microscopic research gave way to a wider lens on science and the social during my Masters in Environmental Studies at York University. In 2006, I finished a PhD in S&TS at Cornell University in Ithaca NY under the supervision of sociologist of science Prof. Michael Lynch. My dissertation was about human genetic chimeras, microchimerism, and the ways in which identities are materialized and then complicated by cellular entanglements that defy dogmatic ideas about personhood.

Since then I have been a professor at York University, Department of Sociology, and an Associate Dean in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

I listen to many hours of fiction.

Research areas

I use qualitative methods such as interviews, observations and discourse analysis to examine mundane infrastructures of knowledge in the life sciences. By this, I mean that I do microsociology and close readings of archives for rudimentary ordering of words and objects through, for example, counting, naming and classifying. My research has landed on specific topical areas – cytogenetic history, human genetic chimerism and microchimerism, the “new” disease Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, and the old disease “mongolism” (now Down Syndrome). My research, and administrative practice for that matter, is infused with feminist theories and orientations to the world as it is and as it might be.

Current Research Activities

I am currently writing about naming as a contingent and world-making act, using the case of Down Syndrome to explore some more salient philosophical and practical features wrapped up in assigning names to things. In 1960, geneticist Curt Stern corralled a bunch of prominent doctors and scientists to sign a letter, to be published in Lancet, to initiate a change in name for a genetic condition, then-called “Mongolism” to become "Down Syndrome". The archive I am analyzing includes the correspondence between Stern and each of the signatories, and reveals the social and political contingencies of unsettling an already settled term. Both the original name and the change in nomenclature surface moments of (mis)understanding about biological race and its relationship to developmental pathologies, and the original name is deeply interconnected with Orientalism (Said). Zeroing in on naming in a microsociological context follows an approach and ethnomethodological sensibility of my earlier work on counting, both of which are mundane and often over-looked world-ordering techniques.

Graduate Supervision

I am a member of the Graduate Programs in Sociology, Science & Technology Studies, and Social and Political Thought and supervise graduate students in each of these programs.

While I am in the role of Associate Dean, I am taking on new students only rarely. Interested students should contact me and we can discern whether there is a confluence of interests.

Graduate Students Supervised

PhD Supervisor
Kelly Fritsch (Social and Political Thought): “The Neoliberal Biopolitics of Disability: Towards Emergent Intracorporeal Practices” (2016)

PhD Committee member
Patricia McMillan (Sociology)
Kalina Kamenova (Social and Political Thought)
Jennie Haw (Sociology)
Kelly Holloway (Sociology)

MA Supervisor
Milan Tepic (STS)
Aadita Chaudhury (Environmental Studies)
Danielle Drew Belsky (Interdisciplinary Studies)

Courses Taught

STS 5000/6000 Introduction to Science & Technology Studies
SOCI 6801 Sociological Perspectives on Science, Knowledge and Society
SOCI 6180 Sex and Gender in Social Theory

Edited Books, special issues of journals

Brock, Deborah, Aryn Martin, Rebecca Raby and Mark Thomas (Eds). 2019. Power and Everyday Practices 2nd edition. University of Toronto Press.

Martin, Aryn, Natasha Myers, Ana Viseu and Lucy Suchman, Guest Editors. Special Issue on “The Politics of Care in Technoscience.” Social Studies of Science 2015:45(5).

Martin, Aryn and Jessie Saul. Guest Editors. Special Issue: “Reconstructing Order Through Rhetorics of Risk.” Science, Technology & Human Values 2004:29(3).

Chapters in Books

Martin, Aryn. 2019. “Science and the Matter of Power” In Power and Everyday Practices. Edited by Deborah Brock, Aryn Martin, Rebecca Raby, and Mark Thomas. Scarborough: Nelson.

Noack, Andrea and Martin, Aryn. 2019. “Assembling Our Tool Kit: Interrogating Representations and Discourses” In Power and Everyday Practices. Edited by Deborah Brock, Aryn Martin, Rebecca Raby, and Mark Thomas. Scarborough: Nelson.

Warin, Megan and Aryn Martin. 2018. ‘Emergent postgenomic bodies and their (non)scalable environments.’ Pp 703-725 in The Palgrave Handbook of Biology and Society. Eds. Meloni, Cromby, Fitzgerald, and Lloyd. Palgrave Macmillan.

Martin, Aryn. 2011. “Science as Culture” In Power and Everyday Practices. Edited by Deborah Brock, Rebecca Raby, and Mark Thomas. Scarborough: Nelson.

Martin, Aryn and Mary Simms. 2011. “Labeling Lisbeth: Stigma and Spoiled Identity” In The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy. Edited by Eric Bronson. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.

Bennett, Jay and Aryn Martin. 2004. “The Numbers Game: What Fans Should Know About the Stats They Love.” Pp. 233-245 in Baseball and Philosophy: Thinking Outside the Batter’s Box, Edited by E. Bronson. Chicago: Open Court.

Refereed Journal Articles

Martin, Aryn and Alasdair McMillan. 2020. “Concussion killjoys: CTE, violence and the brain’s becoming.” BioSocieties (Online First).

Martin, Aryn. 2015. “Ray Owen and the germination of naturally acquired chimerism.” Chimerism 6,1-2: 2-7.

Martin, Aryn, Natasha Myers and Ana Viseu. 2015. “The Politics of Care in Technoscience.” Social Studies of Science 45(5): 1-17.

Martin, Aryn and Kelly Holloway. 2014. “’Something there is that does not love a wall’: Histories of the placental barrier.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences (Special issue on “Transforming Pregnancy Since 1900”) 47: 300-310.

Martin, Aryn. 2010. “’Your Mother’s Always With You’: Material Feminism and Fetomaternal Microchimerism.” Resources for Feminist Research / Documentation sur la Recherche Féministe (Special issue on “The Nature of Feminist Science Studies”) 33 (3&4): 31-46.

Martin, Aryn. 2010. “Microchimerism in the Mother(land): Blurring the Borders of Body and Nation in Fetomaternal Cell Trafficking.” Body and Society 16(3): 23-50.

Martin, Aryn and Michael E. Lynch. 2009. “Counting Things and People: The Practices and Politics of Counting.” Social Problems 56(2): 243-266.

Martin, Aryn. 2007. “The Chimera of Liberal Individualism: How cells became selves in human clinical genetics.” Osiris (Issue on the Self as Political and Scientific Project) 22: 205-222.

Martin, Aryn. 2004. “Can’t Any Body Count? Counting as an Epistemic Theme in the History of Human Chromosomes.” Social Studies of Science 34(6): 923-948.

Khalifa MM, Yamashiro H, Duncan AMV, Hefferon M, Martin AE. 1996. “A Female with Monosomy 18 Mosaicism: A Previously Undescribed Chromosome Abnormality.” Clinical Genetics

Non-refereed Articles

Martin, Aryn. 2007. “‘Incongruous Juxtapositions’: The Chimaera and Mrs. McK.” Endeavour 31(3): 99-103.

Martin, Aryn. 2002. “Genome Presence: The Work of a Diagnostic/Iconic Image.” FES Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Series 6(5).

UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund). 1999. “Programming for Safe Motherhood: Guidelines for Maternal and Neonatal Survival.” New York: UNICEF. (One of four co-authors).

Martin, Aryn. 1997. “Infertility: A Literature Review and Annotated Bibliography,” Women's Health Project, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Editorial positions
2009–2014. Co-editor (with S. LaChappelle). Communiqué, Newsletter for the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science.

2009–2012. Book Reviews Editor. Social Studies of Science. Michael Lynch (ed.), Sage.

Major consultations, in-service workshops, and organization of conferences

2020. Co-organizer and panel chair. STS Futures, York University.

2017. Organizer, fundraiser, participant. The OpEd Project Core Seminar (writing for a popular
audience).

2012. Workshop Co-organizer, The Politics of Care in Technoscience Workshop at York University, April 20-22, 2012. 30 participants, total budget $14,000.


Radhika Mongia

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Carmela Murdocca

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Marcello MustoMarcello Musto

Professor

B.A. University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’,
M.A. in Political Sciences, University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’,
Ph. D in Philosophy, University of Nice ‘Sophia Antipolis’
Ph. D in Philosophy and Politics, University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’.

Twitter: @MarMusto

Faculty Profile
Academia.edu

Biography

My research has focused primarily on Karl Marx’s work and the critical analysis of varieties of Marxism and Socialist thought. My major writings comprise four single-authored books, ten edited books, and 50 journal articles or chapters in books. I am the editor of the Book Series Marx, Engels, Marxisms at Palgrave Macmillan and I serve on the editorial board of 12 journals.

My writings have been published worldwide in more than twenty languages and are available at www.marcellomusto.org.

Research areas

My main academic interests are Sociological Theory, Political Sociology, and the History of Political Thought.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020–22: Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Insight Development Grant (no. 430-2020-00985), “Alternative Socio-Economic Ideas, 1789-1871”. [CAD $ 70,305].
  • 2016–17: SSHRC Connection Grant, “Marx’s Capital after 150 Years (1867-2017)”, Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (No. 611-2016-0334) [CAD $ 25,000].

Graduate Supervision

I am accepting new students working in Sociological Theory, Political Sociology, History of political thought, Political theory, Intellectual history, Political philosophy.

Graduate Students Supervised

MA Supervision
Leigh Denholm, Sociology, The Potential of Praxis: Material and Philosophical Affinities of the Early Church and Marx, 2017 (RRP).

Babak Amini, Sociology, Dissemination and Reception of Karl Marx’s 'Capital' in the United States, Britain, and Canada, 2016 (RRP).

Umbrin Khalid, Social and Political Thought, Marx's Critique of Proudhon, 2013 (MRP).

Courses Taught

GS/SOCI 6200—Contemporary Topics in Social Theory: Rediscovering Marx
GS/SOCI 6711—Social Movements
GS/SOCI 6190—Selected Topics in Classical and Contemporary Theory
GS/SPTH 6219—From Hegel to Marx
GS/SPTH 6200—Appropriating Marx’s <em<Capital I
GS/SPTH 6200—Appropriating Marx’s <em<Capital II

Books

The Last Years of Karl Marx: An Intellectual Biography, Stanford University Press, 2020.
(Translated into Italian, Tamil, Korean, German, Japanese, Arabic, Farsi, Spanish, Portuguese, Hindi, Indonesian, Catalan)

Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International, Bloomsbury Academic, 2018.
(Translated into Japanese, Hungarian, Indonesian)

Karl Marx. Biografia intellettuale e politica, 1857–1883 [Karl Marx: Intellectual and Political Biography, 1857-1883], Einaudi, 2018.
(Translated into Spanish)

Ripensare Marx e i marxismi. Studi e saggi [Rethinking Marx and Marxisms: Studies and Essays], Carocci, 2011.
(Translated into Korean)

Edited Books

Karl Marx’s Writings on Alienation, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021.
(Translated into Italian)

The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Interpretations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020.
(Translated into Italian, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, German, Spanish, Arabic)

(With Shaibal Gupta and Babak Amini) Karl Marx’s Life, Ideas, and Influences: A Critical Examination on the Bicentenary, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019.

Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism, London-New York: Routledge, 2019.
(Translated into Italian and Chinese)

(With George Comninel and Victor Wallis) The International After 150 Years: Labour Versus Capital, Then and Now, New York–London: Routledge, 2015.

Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014.
(Translated into Italian, Portuguese, French, Spanish)

Marx for Today, London-New York: Routledge, 2012.
(Translated into Spanish, Chinese, Spanish)

Karl Marx, Introduzione alla critica dell’economia politica, Macerata: Quodlibet, 2010.

Karl Marx’s Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, London–New York: Routledge, 2008.
(Translated into Farsi, Chinese, Italian, Spanish)

Sulle tracce di un fantasma. L’opera di Karl Marx tra filologia e filosofia, Roma: Manifestolibri, 2005.
(Translated into Spanish)

Refereed Journal Articles

“New Profiles of Marx after the Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA2)”, Contemporary Sociology, vol. 49 (2020), n. 4, pp. 407-419.
(Translated into Indonesian, French, Chinese)

“The Civil War in the USA and the Independence of Poland: Marx and the Politics of Emancipation”, Economic & Political Weekly, vol. 54 (2019), n. 24, pp. 50-54.
(Translated into Indonesia, Chinese)

“The Writing of Capital: Genesis and Structure of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy”, Critique, vol. 46 (2018), n. 1: 11-26.
(Translated into German, Portuguese, Chinese, Finnish)

“The Post-1989 Radical Left in Europe: Results and Prospects”, Socialism and Democracy, vol. 31 (2017), n. 2 (July): 1-32.
(Translated into Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Indonesian, Chinese, Japanese)

“Le dernier voyage de Marx: éléments pour une biographie intellectuelle”, Actuel Marx, vol. 2017/1, n. 61 (March), pp. 106-123.
(Translated into Portuguese)

“The Myth of the ‘Young Marx’ in the Interpretations of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844”, Critique, vol. 43 (2015), n. 2: 233-260.
(Translated into Italian, Spanish, Chinese, Portuguese, Indonesian)

“Notes on the History of the International”, Socialism and Democracy, vol. 28, n. 2 (July 2014): 5-38.
(Translated into German, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Indonesian, Farsi)

“Revisiting Marx’s Concept of Alienation”, Socialism and Democracy, vol. 24 (2010), n. 3 (November): 79-101.
(Translated into Italian, Korean, French, Russian, Portuguese, Hungarian, Spanish, Chinese, Farsi)

“The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the Studies of 1843 to the Grundrisse”, Socialism and Democracy, vol. 24 (2010), n. 2 (July): 66-100.
(Translated into Italian, Korean, Chinese, French, Portuguese, German)

“Marx in Paris: Manuscripts and Notebooks of 1844”, Science & Society, vol. 73 (2009), n. 3 (July): 386-402.
(Translated into Italian, German, French, Greek, Chinses, Korean, Spanish)

“Dissemination and Reception of the Manifesto of the Communist Party in Italy: From the origins to 1945”, Critique, n. 45 (December 2008): 435-446.
(Translated into Japanese, Italian, French, Portuguese, Hungarian, German, Indonesian, Spanish)

“Marx at the time of Mr. Vogt. Notes on an intellectual biography (1860-61)”, Science & Society, vol. 72 (2008), n. 4 (October): 389-402.
(Translated into Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

“The Rediscovery of Karl Marx”, International Review of Social History, vol. 52 (2007), n. 3: 477-498.
(Translated into Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Chinese, French, Korean, Turkish, Finnish, Spanish, Russian)

Chapters in Books

“Alienation Redux: Marxian Perspectives”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Karl Marx, Karl Marx’s Writings on Alienation, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, pp. 1-42.
(Translated into Italian)

“Communism”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Critical Interpretations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020, pp. 24-50.
(Translated into Italian, Indonesian)

“Marx’s Critique of German Social Democracy: From the International to the Political Struggles of the 1870s”, in Shaibal Gupta—Marcello Musto—Babak Amini (Eds.), Karl Marx —Life, Ideas, Influence: A Critical Examination on the Bicentenary, New York: Palgrave–Macmillan, 2019, pp. 21-40.
(Translated into Indonesia, Chinese)

“Introduction: The Unfinished Critique of Capital”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism, London-New York: Routledge, 2019, pp. 1-35.
(Translated into Spanish)

“Introduction”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.) Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.
(Translated into Italian, Portuguese, Tamil, Hindu, Telugu, French, Spanish)

“Introduction”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.) Marx for Today, London/New York: Routledge, 2012, pp. 1-19.
(Translated into Spanish, Chinese)

“Dissemination and Reception of the Grundrisse in the World: Introduction”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, London–New York: Routledge, 2008, pp. 177-188.
(Translated into Hungarian, Greek, Russian, Italian, Portuguese, Farsi, German, Chinese, Spanish)

“Marx’s Life at the Time of the Grundrisse. Biographical Notes on 1857–8”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.) Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, London–New York: Routledge, 2008, pp. 147-161.
(Translated into Italian, French, Portuguese, Farsi, Chinese, Spanish)

“History, Production and Method in the ‘1857 Introduction’”, in Marcello Musto (Ed.) Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, London–New York: Routledge, 2008, pp. 3-32.
(Translated into Farsi, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish)

President’s Emerging Research Leadership Award (PERLA), 2018.
Routledge Super-Author of Politics, December 2012.
Foundation “Luigi Salvatorelli” Award, Pergugia – Italy, 2008.
David Rjazanov Preis. Institution: Berliner Verein zur Förderung der MEGA-Edition, Berlin—Germany, 2006.


photo of Eric MykhalovskiyEric Mykhalovskiy

Professor
Graduate Program Director

B.A Sociology, King's University College, Western University (1984),
M.A. Sociology, York University (1987),
Ph.D. Sociology, York University (2000)

Twitter: @EriMyk
Faculty Profile

Biography

I am a professor in the Department of Sociology and the Director of the Graduate Program in Sociology at York University. My road to a professional life as a sociologist began as a fluke when the first year undergraduate French class I had hoped to take was scheduled on a Friday morning at the far end of my university campus. I took sociology instead. I loved how sociology gave me intellectual resources for understanding my life in relation to the world around me. After some time away from the university, I returned and completed my PhD in 2000. I then spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Toronto. I worked for three years in a tenure-stream position in the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, at Dalhousie University before joining York’s Sociology Department in 2005.

I identify primarily as a sociologist of health and illness. In my research, I draw on Foucauldian perspectives, strands of science and technology studies, and traditions of engaged scholarship. Most importantly, my work is influenced by the scholarship of Dorothy E. Smith, particularly, her approach to the study of the social organization of knowledge and her articulation of institutional ethnography as an alternative sociology. In my research, I typically work from experience—my own and/or my research participants’—as a point of departure for inquiries of the extended social, institutional and discursive relations through which health, illness, and health care are ruled or governed. In my research, I often emphasize questions about the role that formal discourses of knowledge play in contemporary forms of governance that bear on health and illness.

Most recently, I have come to conceptualize my research as inhabiting a scholarly and political space that I call "critical social science with public health." Over the years, I have conducted research on a range of topics including evidence-based decision making in health care, the privatization of health care, the health work of people living with chronic illness, animal-assisted therapy, global systems of public health surveillance, and social inequalities in youth smoking. The most important trajectory of research I have conducted focuses on HIV and explores the social organization of the biomedical and broader institutional and discursive response to the HIV epidemic in Canada. A particular highlight has been the work I’ve done on HIV criminalization, particularly on tensions between the public health and criminal law governance of activities presumed to risk HIV transmission. Much of my research, particularly in HIV, involves close partnerships with community groups and activists, commits to progressive social transformation and crosses boundaries between so-called applied and theoretically-oriented scholarship.

Research areas

Sociology of health and illness, institutional ethnography, critical social science with public health, qualitative research methodologies, HIV

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on a number of writing projects associated with current and previous research grants. First, I am working through a preliminary analysis of interviews with people who experience serious problems with residential “nuisance” noise. As I explore the data my concern is to conceptualize how a particular class of sonic phenomena figures into how we live in cities. I hope to create an analysis of the intersection between experiences of noise, built environments, and the governance of noise and determine what next steps might be for more in-depth research. Second, I am working on an analysis of the role played by the concept of “context” in the emerging field of population health intervention research. Drawing on an analysis of 45 field-defining journal articles, I am trying to write about how “context” is currently used in the literature and the theories that inform that use, with a view to developing a more reflexive understanding of the conceptual work that the concept does in this field of research. Third, I am working on a revision of a paper on the institutional ethnographic concept of “health work,” published almost 20 years ago with my colleague Liza McCoy, for a proposed edited collection that will feature research informed by the concept. Fourth, I have begun a process of revisiting institutional ethnographic research on HIV that I have conducted over a period of almost 30 years. My hope is to create a book that weaves together analytic narratives focused on doing activist sociology, changes in the social presence of HIV treatment, and shifts in the practice of institutional ethnography.

Selected Research Grants

2020 ChemStory: community produced podcasts to spark conversations about Chemsex and HIV Prevention CIHR Catalyst Grant: HIV/AIDS and STBBI Community-Based (co-applicant)

2019 Residential Nuisance Noise in Downtown Toronto: Pilot Institutional Ethnographic Research York University Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Minor Research Grant (principal applicant)

2019 FEAST Centre for Indigenous STBBI Research CIHR Centres for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C and STBBIs Research - Indigenous populations (co-applicant)

2018 Understanding contextual factors to effectively and equitably scale up GetCheckedOnline to diverse populations and geographic settings. (co-applicant)

2017 Critical social science, context and population health interventions: A proposal to develop comparative case study research. CIHR Planning and Dissemination Grant (principal applicant)

2012 HIV prevention and the criminal law: An international research workshop on the public health impact of criminalizing HIV exposure/transmission. CIHR Centre for Social Research in HIV Prevention (principal applicant)

2010 Criminalization of HIV non-disclosure in Ontario: Promoting and informing sound public policy. Ontario HIV Treatment Network. Board-directed Funds (principal applicant)

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the area of the sociology of health and illness who are pursuing topics from a perspective that aligns with a critical social science with public health approach.

Graduate Students Supervised

Colin Hastings. 20 March 2020. Writing for digital news: The social organization of news stories about HIV criminalization in an age of convergence journalism. (PhD Graduate Program in Sociology)

Julia Gruson-Wood. 24 August 2018. ‘I’m a juggling robot:’ An ethnography of the organization and culture of autism-based applied behavior therapies in Ontario, Canada. (PhD Graduate Program in Science & Technology).

Danielle Landry, 31 August 2015. Madness in the method: A critical discourse analysis of psychiatric survivor research from Canada and the UK. (MA Graduate Program in Sociology)

Serena Naim, 14 Sept. 2014. Disabling bodies: Disabling normalities. (M.A. Graduate Program in Science and Technology Studies)

Lina Pinto. 26 August 2014 Cutaneous leishmaniasis and the Colombian armed conflict: other shades of violence. (M.A. Graduate Program in Science and Technology Studies)

Chris Sanders. 21 June 2013. Ontario public health counseling practice following the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure: A contribution to the sociology of public health. (PhD Graduate Program in Sociology).

Micah Anshan. 27 August 2013. Evidence-based or based on evidence: Assessing Canada’s harm-reduction debate.(M.A. Graduate Program in Science and Technology Studies)

Jackie Boyce. 7 May 2012. Biomedicalization and gendered pharmaceuticals: An examination of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and Viagra. (M.A. Graduate Program in Sociology)

Darcy L’Heureux. 18 April 2011. A sad “state” of affairs: Understanding the role of the state in HIV/AIDS literature. (M.A. Graduate Program in Sociology)

Giselle Dias. 9 Nov. 2010. Structural violence and the discourse on HIV/AIDS and prisons. (M.A. Graduate Program in Sociology)

Sha, Lonnie. 14 Sept. 2007 Moral panic: crystal meth (methamphetamine) use among gay men. (M.A. Graduate Program in Sociology)

Courses Taught

SOCI 5995 MA Seminar
SOCI 6001 Doctoral Seminar 1
SOCI 6002 Doctoral Seminar 2
SOCI 6090 Selected Topics in Empirical Methods: Institutional Ethnography
SOCI 6831 Health and Illness

Books

Mykhalovskiy, E. Choiniere, J., Armstrong, H., Armstrong, P. (Eds.) 2020 Health matters: Evidence, critical social science and health care in Canada. University of Toronto Press.

Mykhalovskiy, E. and V. Namaste. (Eds.) 2019. Thinking differently about HIV/AIDS: Contributions from critical social science. UBC Press.

Weir, L. and Mykhalovskiy, E. Global public health vigilance: Creating a world on alert. New York: Routledge. 2010

Armstrong, P., H. Armstrong, I. Bourgeault, J. Choiniere, E. Mykhalovskiy, and J.P. White. Heal thyself: Managing health care reform. Toronto: Garamond Press 2000

Refereed Journal Articles

Mykhalovskiy, E., Rock, M. Kanarek, R. Hastings, C., and Doig, J. 2020. Normative tensions in the popular representation of children with disabilities and animal-assisted therapy. Canadian Journal of Disability Studies 9(2): 10-38.

Mykhalovskiy, E. Hastings, C., Sanders, C. and Bisaillon, L. Explicitly Racialised and Extraordinarily Over-Represented: Black Immigrant Men in 25 Years of News Reports on HIV Non-Disclosure Criminal Cases in Canada. Culture, Health and Sexuality.
DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2020.1733095

Mykhalovskiy, E., Frohlich, K., Poland, B. Ruggiero, E., Rock, M., and Comer, L. 2019. Critical social science with public health: Agonism, critique and engagement. Critical Public Health, 29(5): 522-533.

Mykhalovskiy, E., Eakin, J., Beagan, B., Beausoleil, N., Gibson, B.E., Macdonald, M. Rock, M.J. 2018. Beyond bare bones: critical, theoretically-engaged qualitative research in public health. Canadian Journal of Public Health. 109(5-6): 613-621.

Mykhalovskiy, E. 2015. Critical perspectives on the public health implications of HIV criminalization. Critical Public Health. 25(4): 373-385.

French, M. and Mykhalovskiy, E. 2013. Public health intelligence and the detection of potential pandemics. Sociology of Health & Illness. 35(2):174-187.

Mykhalovskiy, E. and G. Betteridge. 2012. Who? What? Where? When? And with what consequences? An analysis of criminal cases of HIV non-disclosure in Canada. Canadian Journal of Law and Society. 27(1):31-53.

Frohlich, K., Mykhalovskiy, E., Poland, B., Johnson, J. and Haines, R. 2012. "Creating" the socially marginalised youth smoker: The role of tobacco control. Sociology of Health & Illness. 34(7):978-993.

Mykhalovskiy, E. 2011. The problem of ‘significant risk’: Exploring the public health impact of criminalizing HIV non-disclosure. Social Science & Medicine. 73(5): 668-675.

Chapters in Books

Mykhalovskiy, E., Comer, L., Gruson-Wood, J., Hastings, C., Strang, M. Teaching institutional ethnography as an alternative sociology. In Luken, P. (Ed.) Handbook of Institutional Ethnography. Palgrave-MacMillan. Accepted.

Foote, C. E., Bernard, E. and Mykhalovskiy, E. 2018. Solutions to Ending the Global Social Problem of HIV Criminalization. In G. Muschert, K. Budd, M. Christian, B. Klocke, R. Perrucci and J. Shefner (eds.) Agenda for Social Justice. Bristol: Policy Press. Pp. 31-40.

Mykhalovskiy, E. 2018. Institutional Ethnography and Activist Futures. In M. Schultz (ed.) Frontiers of Global Sociology. Research Perspectives for the 21st Century. Berlin/New York: International Sociological Association. Pp. 296-304.

French, M., Mykhalovskiy, E. and Carmen Lamothe. 2018. Epidemics, Pandemics and Outbreak. In J. Trevino (ed.) Cambridge, New York: Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems. Pp.59-78.

Mykhalovskiy, E. 2016. Making science count: significant risk, HIV Non-disclosure and science-based criminal law reform: A reflexive analysis. In Stanton, C. and Quirk, H. (Eds.) Criminalising contagion: Legal and ethical challenges of disease transmission and the criminal law. Cambridge University Press. Pp. 150-74.

Mykhalovskiy, E. 2013. Reconsidering Table Talk: Critical Thoughts on the Relationship Between Sociology, Autobiography and Self-Indulgence. In Sikes, P. (Ed.) Autoethnography. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. Pp. (Reprint)

Canadian Association for HIV/AIDS Research-Canadian Foundation for AIDS Research Excellence in Research Award for the Social Sciences (2017)

Inaugural Award for Distinction in Research in Social Justice, York University, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (2015)

Dorothy E. Smith Award for Scholar-Activism, Institutional Ethnography Division, Society for the Study of Social Problems (2014)

Dean’s Award for Outstanding Research, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University (2007)

Editor, Institutional Ethnography: Studies in the Social Organization of Knowledge Book Series, University of Toronto Press (2020 to present)
Senior Editor, Canadian Journal of Public Health (2015 to present)
International Advisory Board, Critical Public Health (2014 to present)
Medicine and Society Advisory Group, Canadian Medical Association Journal (2014 to present)
Advisory Board Member, Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (2011 to present)
Fellow, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University (2013-present)
Vice President, Working Group on Institutional Ethnography, International Sociological Association (2016-2020)
Founding Member and Member, Board of Directors, Association for the Social Sciences and Humanities in HIV (ASSHH) (2010-2015)


photo of Michael NijhawanMichael Nijhawan

Associate Professor

MA University of Heidelberg,
PhD University of Heidelberg

Faculty Profile

Biography

My intellectual journey began at the South Asia Institute at the University of Heidelberg and Delhi University at a time of major epistemological shifts (post-writing culture anthropology, unhinging the Orientalist legacy of German Indology) and political upheavals (surge of Hindu nationalism & ‘communal violence’) in the 1990s. I was fortunate to be taught by postcolonial anthropologists, historians associated with the subaltern studies school, and sociologists who critically engaged with inherited canons such as Weber’s typologies of Asian religion. Studying at the South Asia Institute, I joined a community of scholars whose DNA it was to work across disciplines. At D-School in Delhi, I was early on exposed to read & understand sociological canons from outside Europe (“Provincializing Europe” if you prefer Dipesh Chakrabarty’s popular idiom).

For my M.A. thesis, I examined Urdu short stories by some of my favorite progressive writers, Rajinder Singh Bedi, Intizar Hussein, and Sadat Hassan Manto, alongside poet Fahmida Riaz and others. Each of them dealt with the repercussions of the Partition of 1947 that marked the end of British colonial rule in India and caused major social rifts and hurt in the course of large-scale migrations and inter-communal violence. My PhD thesis further probed into the longterm impacts of the Partition, this time by studying a group of marginalized Punjabi musicians and storytellers that had shifted religious and political affiliations. I got interested in their cross-border social history, the change in repertoire and performative contexts, their experiences with caste-ism and their role during the 1984 crisis. This study furthered my interest in ethnographies of violence and everyday worlds of recovery and performativity.

With the new millennium, I gradually shifted my attention to North American academic discourses & debates. I lived in Berkely, California for a few years, and in the interim accepted a post-doctoral research fellowship in Germany that allowed me to do some more research work in South Asia. I came to Toronto in 2005 and for the first year was part-time primary caregiver for my toddler and part-time translating my dissertation to a book. I joined the Department of Sociology at York in 2006. Between 2006 and 2016 my next big project was a study that charted transnational social fields and diaspora formations across Europe and North America. I had been working with a group of critical, postcolonial theorists of diapora, race, and religion and so my next project evolved around the idea of “precarious diasporas”. Rather than studying diasporas as clearly delineated, group-based constructs, I was interested in the political processes that positioned Sikh and Ahmadi subjects as both racially marked and religiously ‘othered’ subjects. To examine these processes of fragmentation and subjectification, I investigated key sites of public discourse (anti-immigrant mobilizations), (asylum) law, everyday religious practices, (youth) activism, and (post) memory discourse.

Research areas

My research areas include: Diaspora Formations, Migrant Precarity, Violence & Social Suffering, Medical Anthropology, Social Margins, Religion & Secularism, Sikh & Punjab Studies

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on a creative project and prepare a research grant on autoimmunity.

Select Research Grants

2017. Academic Workshop Grant (Canada 150 @ York Initiatives): Unsettling Canada at 150: Memory Discourses in Transnational Contexts (co-applicant)

2012. SSHRC Aid in Workshop and Conference Grant: Workshop: Constellations, Confrontations, Aspirations: Diaspora and Transnationalism Through the Lens of Youth Formations. Invited Workshop. York University, Toronto, May 22-23, 2012

SSHRC Standard Grant (2010-13): Predicaments of a “Post-Conflict” Generation: A Comparative Study of Sikh and Ahmadiyya Diaspora Formations in Germany and Canada

Graduate Supervision

I have currently reached the upper limits of my capacity to supervise graduate students, as I also serve on many PhD committees that are not listed here. I will consider accepting new graduate students in 2021–22.

Graduate Students Supervised

I have served on twice as many committees in Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, Culture & Communications, and Interdisciplinary Studies. Hence, the following list does not fully capture the range of students and topics supervised in the past and present.

Current
Duygu Gül (PhD, Sociology), Remembering 1915 in the Diaspora: Memory Work by Armenian Youth in Canada.

Khalida Ramyar (PhD, Sociology), The Social Phenomenon of Afghan Resistance to ‘Political Islam’.

Hena Mehta (PhD, Sociology), From Prayer to Prejudice: A Contemporary Institutional Ethnography of Saffronisation in Brahma Kumaris.

Haris M. Javeed (MA, Sociology), State Formation in Pakistan and the Development of a National Pakistani Identity.

Santbir Singh (MA, Sociology), Rattan Singh Bhangu’s “Prachin Panth Prakash”, A Study of Sikh Political Culture from Critical Anarchist Perspective.

Past
Severine Minot (PhD, Sociology), Subjective Experiences of Expats in Vietnam: Link Relative Social Position, the Habitus and Practice to Cross-Cultural Adaptation, 2014.

Kate Pendakis (PhD, Sociology), Transatlantic Migrancy and the Politics of Kinship: An Ethnography of Greek Resistance against the State. 2015.

Usamah Ansari (1985–2008) (MA, Sociology): Ardous Cultivations: Reiteration, Pain and Ashraf Ali Thanvi’s Bahisti Zewar ‘Heavenly Ornaments' (MA thesis, degree awarded posthumously). 2008.

Ali Abbas Hirji (MA, Sociology): An Ethnographic Inquiry Into a Toronto Shiite Indo-Pakistani Diaspora’s Lamentation Rituals For The Great Granddaughter of the Prophet Muhammad, Sayyedeh Zaynab. 2015.

Nishan Kaushall (MA, Sociology) Of Hand-spun Nations & Its Estranged Familiars: A Struggle for Ancient Futures. 2019.

Hena Mehta (Sociology), Hindu nationalism unfolding through the institutional and the life narratives of the Brahma Kumari. 2017.

Kazhal Mohammadi (MA, Sociology) Kurdish Diaspora Youth. 2016.

Nilum Panesar> (MA, Sociology): The “New” Second Generation. How can we use a transnational lens to reconceptualize second-generation youth identity in Canada? 2016.

Saad Sayyed (MA, Interdisciplinary Studies): Liberalism in the Postcolony: Islam and Subjectivity in Pakistan. 2013.

Nayani Thiyagarajah (MA, Interdisciplinary Studies): Exploring Memory Through Storytelling to Explore Home and Self. (successfully defended)

Courses Taught

SOCI 6200 Contemporary Topics in Social Theory: Sociology of Human Rights & Critique of Humanitarianism
SOCI 6200 Contemporary Topics in Social Theory: Sociology of Postsecular Religion
SOCI 6542 Violence, Identity, and Subjectivity

Books

Nijhawan, Michael. 2016. The Precarious Diasporas of Sikh and Ahmadiyya Generations: Violence, Memory, Agency. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 289pp.

Hadj-Moussa, Ratiba & Michael Nijhawan (Eds.). 2014. Suffering, Art, Aesthetics. Co-edited with Ratiba Hadj-Moussa. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 247pp.

Pemberton, Kelly & Michael Nijhawan. 2009. Shared Idioms, Sacred Symbols, and the Articulation of Identities in South Asia. Co-edited with K. Pemberton. London & New York: Routledge. 253pp.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2006. Dhadi Darbar. Religion, Violence, and the Performance of Sikh History. Delhi: Oxford University Press. 272pp.

Select Refereed Journal Article

Nijhawan, Michael. 2018. Haunted by the Event: A Response. Sikh Formations: Religion, Culture, Theory 16 (1-2).

Nijhawan, Michael; Jenny Wustemberg & Daphne Winland. 2018. Contesting Memory and Citizenship in Canada. (Co-authored with D. Winland & J. Wuestenberg). Citizenship Studies 22(4): 347-57.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2014. 1984 and the Diasporic Politics of Aesthetics: Reconfigurations and New Constellations among Toronto Sikh Youth. Diaspora: A Journal for Transnational Studies 17(2): 196-219.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2013. Violence, Memory and the Dynamics of Transnational Youth Formations. Editorial/Guest-editor with Kamal Arora & Duygu Gul for Sikh Formations: Religion, Culture, Theory 9(3): 269-78.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2013. Lullabies for Broken Children: Diasporic Citizenship and the Dissenting Voices of Young Sikhs in Canada. Co-authored with Kamal Arora. Sikh Formations: Religion, Culture, Theory 9(3): 299-322.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2011. Sikhism, Traumatic Repetition and the Sovereignty of Art. Method and Theory in the Study of Religion 23: 128-42

Nijhawan, Michael. 2010. “Today, We Are All Ahmadi” - Configurations of Heretic Otherness between Lahore and Berlin. British Journal for Middle Eastern Studies 37 (3): 429-47.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2005. Deportability, Medicine, and the Law. Anthropology and Medicine 12(3): 271-86.

Select Chapters in Books

Nijhawan, Michael. 2019. Constructing a Genuine Religious Character: The Impact of the Asylum Court on the Ahmadiyya Community in Germany. In: M. Fuchs et al. (eds). Religious Individualization: Types and Cases. Historical and Crosscultural Explorations. Berlin, Munich, Boston: W. de Gruyter, 1139-64. Open Access.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2019. Migrant Precarity and Religious Individualisation. In: M. Fuchs et al. (eds). Religious Individualization: Types and Cases. Historical and Crosscultural Explorations. Berlin, Munich, Boston: W. de Gruyter, 737-58. Open Access.

Nijhawan, Michael & Anna Schultz. 2014, The Diasporic Rasa of Suffering. Notes on the Aesthetics of Image and Sound in Indo-Caribbean and Sikh Popular Art. In: Ratiba Hadj-Moussa & Michael Nijhawan eds. Art, Aesthetics and Suffering. New York: Palgrave McMillan, pp. 153-78.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2014 Sikh Cultural Performances. In: Pashaura Singh & Lou Fenech eds. The Oxford Handbook of Sikh Studies. Oxford University Press, pp. 408-18.

Nijhawan, Michael. 2011. Precarious Presences, Hallucinatory Times: Configurations of Religious Otherness in German Leitkulturalist Discourse. In Secularism and Religion-Making, ed. Markus Dressler & Arvind Mandair. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 243-68.

Nijhawan, Michael, 2007. Memory, Genre, Voice: The Partition Motif in a Punjabi Performative Genre. In Smita Jassal & Eyal Ben-Ari (eds.), The Partition Motif in Contemporary Conflicts: Israel-Palestine, India-Pakistan, Germany East-West. London: Sage Publications.


Michael Ornstein

Associate Professor

B.Sc., Honours Physics, McGill University,
PhD in Social Relations, Johns Hopkins University.

  •  | Dadeleh 5057 (in the Institute for Social Research), |
  •    ext. 55015 |
  •    ornstein@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile

Biography

I discovered sociology as I was completing a degree in physics. I was especially drawn to community studies of inequality, social class and elites. My dissertation, later published, was one of the first longitudinal studies of occupational mobility. I then turned to research on the broad range of policy political attitudes, in relation to social class, in the public and elites. Since then I have focussed on a variety of empirical topics and also survey research methods.

Research areas

My principal research interest is the quantitative study of social inequality in Canada. This is an area that, in recent decades, sociologists have largely ceded to economists, whose fine work is narrowed, for example, by a focus on full-time workers and on immigration without accounting for racialization.

Current Research Activities

My current research is focussed on changing labour market inequality, considering both individual jobs and personal earnings, from one or multiple jobs, including periods without employment and part-time employment, and from wages and self-employment. This is the fundamental source of inequality, accounting for about three-quarters of all personal income, around ninety percent excluding pensions (which, of course, are based on earlier employment).

Two recent projects deal with precarious jobs and with middle class jobs. Taking apart what is often considered a single class of precarious employment I show that gender shapes the relationship between contractual status, waged versus self-employment and full- and part-time jobs. Departing from the usual emphasis on the “supply side” characteristics of precarious workers, I find that precarious employment is much more strongly related to occupation and industry – much like the effects of COVID on employment. Detailed analysis of middle-class jobs vastly complicates any general idea of the declining in middle class: Examining census data from 1971, I find: a focus on the declining middle class conceals dramatic gains by women workers relative to men; a lopsided polarization whereby some middle class jobs sliding upwards is not balance by a downward slide; and where change is framed by segmentation between full- and part-time jobs, full- and part-year jobs and employees and the self-employed. Next in line, an exploration of the effects of racialization and immigration and language on employment. And after that an examination of the high-income jobs, whose increased numbers and income are the greatest source increased inequality in recent years.

Graduate Supervision

I will work with graduate students interested in quantitative research, defined broadly to over the range from small scale descriptive work to complex modelling with large scale data. Also, I in all intesaspects of survey research methodology.

Graduate Students Supervised

Erika McDonald, doctoral dissertation on the impact of occupational licencing
Lisa Seiler, comprehensive on survey research

Courses Taught

In recent years:
Sociology 2030 Sociological Research Methods
Sociology 3030 Social Statistics I
Sociology 3031 Statistics for Sociology
Sociology 3410 Social Inequality
Sociology 4410 Sociology of Poverty
Sociology 6112 Quantitative Analysis
Sociology 6090 Selected Topics in Empirical Methods (Material Inequality; on Material
Inequality and Politics)

Books

"The Impact of Labour Market Entry Factors: Illustrations from the Hopkins' Social Accounts Project." (with Peter H. Rossi) Pp. 269-312 in Walter Muller and Karl Ulrich Mayer, eds., Social Stratification and Career Mobility. Paris: Mouton, 1973.

Entry Into the American Labor Force. New York: Academic Press, 1976.

Politics and Ideology in Canada: Elite and Public Opinion in the Transformation of a Welfare State. (with H. Michael Stevenson). Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s Press, 1999 (vii+497). Winner of the 2001 Harold Adams Innis Prize for the best SSFC supported book in the Social Sciences and English.

A Companion to Survey Research. London: Sage, 2013.

Refereed Journal Articles

“Neo-Conservatism in Ontario: Revolution or Coup d’État?” Sociologie et sociétes 35, No. 1, (Spring 2003): 95-114.

“Gender and Promotion at Canadian Universities,” (with Janice Drakich and Penni Stewart) Canadian Journal of Sociology 46, No. 1 (February 2009): 59-85.

“Promotion at Canadian Universities: the Intersection of Gender, Discipline and Institution,” (with Janice Drakich and Penni Stewart) Canadian Journal of Higher Education 37, No. 3 (September): 1-25. 2009 winner of the Edward F. Sheffield Award from the Canadian Society for Studies in Higher Education.

“Cohort and Period Perspectives on Gender, Education, and Earnings in Canada.” Canadian Public Policy 37, No S1 (February 2011): 95-113.

“Canadian Families’ Strategies for Employment and Care for Pre-School Children.” (with Glenn Stalker) Journal of Family Issues 34, No. 1 (January 2013): 53-84.

“Quebec, Daycare, and the Household Strategies of Couples with Young Children.” (with Glenn Stalker) Canadian Public Policy 39, No. 2 (June 2013):214-62.

Chapters in Books

"The Development of the Canadian Class Structure." Pp. 216-259 in J. Paul Grayson, ed., Introduction to Sociology: An Alternate Approach. Toronto: Gage, 1983.

"Capital and the Canadian State: Ideology in an Era of Crisis." Pp. 129-166 in Robert Brym, ed., The Structure of the Canadian Capitalist Class. Toronto: Garamond, 1985.

"The Political Ideology of the Canadian Capitalist Class." Ch 51, pp. 528-41 in Lorne Tepperman and James Curtis, eds., Readings in Sociology: An Introduction. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson.

"Social Class and Economic Inequality." in Lorne Tepperman and James Curtis, eds., Understanding Canadian Society. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1988.

"Employers and Pay" Pp. 33-59 in Robert Althauser and Michael Wallace, eds., Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, Vol. 11 (1992)

“Three Decades of Elite Research in Canada: John Porter’s Unfulfilled Legacy.” Pp. 145-79 in James Curtis and Richard Helmes-Hayes, eds., The Vertical Mosaic Revisited. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998.

“Demographic Changes in the Gay Village.” (with Tim McCaskell), pp. 66-70 in Stephanie Chambers et al., Any Other Way: How Toronto Got Queer Toronto: Coach House Books.


Hyun Ok Park

Professor

Faculty Profile


Norene Pupo

Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Joanna RobinsonJoanna L. Robinson

Associate Professor

B.A. Sociology, McGill University, (1998),
PhD. Sociology, University of British Columbia, (2011).

Faculty Profile

Biography

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Glendon campus. My research and teaching interests are in the areas of climate politics, labour and inequality, environmental and social justice. I completed my BA at McGill University, my PhD in Sociology at the University of British Columbia, and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley (funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada). My research focuses on environmental politics, climate change and social movements in a cross-national comparative perspective. My first book Contested Water: Anti-Water Privatization in the United States and Canada (MIT Press) examines the growing push to privatize municipal water services around the world and the cross sectoral movements that emerge in response to water privatization. My current research projects, funded by SSHRC, focus on the transition to a low carbon economy, and examine a) the role of labour and environmental movements in shaping the transition to a green economy in the United States and Canada; b) how workers in carbon-intensive sectors of the economy (auto sector workers in particular) negotiate and experience transition to green jobs; c) the transformation of the Canadian environmental movement in light of climate justice and new partnerships with Indigenous organizations, and c) the potential for a green new deal to provide secure pathways to living wage employment for racialized and low-income workers. I have published journal articles and book chapters on social movements, climate change and environmental politics and am currently editing a volume on the Green New Deal from a global perspective (Routledge). My work was recognized by the Glendon Principal’s award for research in 2015.

Research areas

My research areas include climate change, social movements, labour and inequality, globalization, environmental politics and social policy.

Current Research Activities

I am currently working on two major research projects. The first project, Working a Green Job: Workforce Development and the Experience of Workers in the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy (funded by a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant) focuses on the changing world of work in traditional carbon-intensive sectors in the transition to a green economy. The research is based on 60 interviews with auto sector workers and union leaders and examines the impact of the transition to a green economy on workers employed the auto manufacturing industry, and how they negotiate and experience this transition. This transition has the potential to create millions of new jobs and protect the environment, by redirecting job creation and investment towards new “green” industries, while at the same time can potentially address issues of growing poverty and inequality by creating high quality, living-wage jobs. Examining how rank-and- file workers experience transition to green jobs is critical for understanding the changing world of work in response to climate policies and for shaping green workforce development policies.

The second project, Building a New Environmentalism: Changing Opportunities, Frames and Tactics in the Canadian Environmental Movement (funded by a SSHRC Insight Grant), focuses on the environmental movement in Canada and its response to the changing political and economic context, including the conflicting emphasis by policy makers on resource extraction and the construction of new oil and gas pipelines on the one hand, and the push towards a zero emissions economy, on the other. The research also examines the decreasing capacity of the environmental movement to influence national climate policy. Drawing on in-depth interviews with environmental leaders and organizations in Canada, the research examines how the broader environmental movement is adapting to the shift in political opportunities, by adopting new tactics and frames focused on climate justice, and building relationships across movement sectors, including with Indigenous organizations and activists. Examining how environmental movement leaders and activists understand and experience the changing nature of political opportunities and work to revitalize and transform the environmental movement is critical for understanding how social movement are responding to the climate crisis and what impact they potentially have on policy outcomes.

Selected Research Grants

“Building a New Environmentalism: Changing Opportunities, Frames and Tactics in the Canadian Environmental Movement” SSHRC Insight Grant, Principal Investigator 2018-2021

“Working a Green Job: Workforce Development and the Experience of Workers in the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy” SSHRC Partnership Development Grant, Principal Investigator 2015-2018

“Adapting Canadian Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change” SSHRC Partnership Grant, Co-Investigator (PI, Dr. Carla Lipsig- Mummé, York University) 2014-2020

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the area of the environmental sociology, social movements, labour and work, and social policy.

Books

Robinson, Joanna. 2013. Contested Water: The Struggle Against Water Privatization in the
United States and Canada
. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/contested-water

Refereed Journal Articles

Robinson, Joanna. 2020. “Building a Green Economy: Advancing Climate Justice through
Labour-Environmental Alliances.” Mobilization 25(2): 245-264. 10.17813/1086-671X-25-2-245

Tindall, David and Joanna L. Robinson. 2017. “Environmentalist Social Networks and
Collective Action to Save the Ancient Temperate Rainforests of British Columbia: The Case of Clayoquot Sound.” Ecology and Society 22(1). 10.5751/ES-09042-220140

Robinson, Joanna, David Tindall, Erin Seldat and Gabriella Pechlaner. 2007. “Support for First Nations’ Land Claims Amongst Wilderness Preservation Movement Participants: The Potential for an Environmental Justice Movement in British Columbia”. Local Environment 12(6): 579-598. 10.1080/13549830701657307

Chapters in Books

Robinson, Joanna. 2016. “Contested Water: Risk, Resilience and the Politics of Conservation” in
Beth Schaefer Caniglia, Beatrice F. Frank and Manuel Vallee (eds.). Resilience, Environmental Justice and the City. New York: Routledge. 157-176.

Tindall, David and Joanna Robinson. 2015. “The Concept of Social Movement Revisited.”
In Protest and Politics: The Promise of Social Movement Societies, edited by Howard Ramos and Kathleen Rodgers. Vancouver: UBC Press: 208-232.

Tindall, D.B., Joanna L. Robinson, Mark C.J. Stoddart. 2015. “A View from Sociology:
Environmental Movement Mobilization Over Old Growth Temperate Rainforests in British Columbia.” In Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions, edited by Stephen Redpath, Ralph Gutierrez, Kenvi Wood, and Juliette Young. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press: 152-167 10.1017/CBO9781139084574.012

Tindall, D.B., Joanna L Robinson, and Mark C.J. Stoddart. 2014. “Social Network Centrality,
Movement Identification, and the Participation of Individuals In a Social Movement:
The Case of the Canadian Environmental Movement.” In Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications, edited by Matthias Dehmer and Frank Emmert-Streib. Oxford, UK: Chapman and Hall/CRC. 407-424.

Robinson, Joanna and David Tindall. 2008. “Defending the Forest: Chronicles of Protest at
Clayoquot Sound” in Christine Lowther and Anita Sinner (eds.). Writing the West Coast: In Love with Place. Vancouver, B.C.: Ronsdale Press. 232-247.

Other Publications

Tindall, David, Robinson, Joanna and Mark Stoddart. 2018. “Lessons from Clayoquot Sound for
the Trans Mountain Protest.” The Conversation August 27. theconversation.com

Robinson, Joanna. 2017. Review of Abers, Rebecca Neaera and Margaret Keck, “Practical
Authority: Agency and Institutional Change in Brazilian Water Politics.” Contemporary Sociology 46(1): 27-29. 10.1177/0094306116681813

Principal’s Research Excellence Award, Emerging Scholar, Glendon College, York University (2015)
American Sociological Association, Honorable Mention, Dissertation Award (2011)


photo of Richard SaundersRichard G. Saunders

Associate Professor

BA Political Science, St. Francis Xavier University, (1980),
MA Political Science, Queen's University, (1981),
PhD Political Science, Carleton University, (1992).

Faculty Profile

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics, where my teaching has focused on African political economy, ‘development studies’ and comparative politics more broadly. I have taught several Africa-focused courses at undergraduate and graduate level, although in the past ten years my graduate teaching has included the wider scope of the Global South and focused increasingly on themes of state and non-state politics in the 21st Century. My graduate supervision has included PhD and MA students working on projects involving different areas in the Global South, with an emphasis on Africa and Latin America. My broader interest in engaging with Southern research and debates has led to my appointment as an associate faculty member in the graduate programs of International Development Studies in LA&PS and the Faculty of Health here at York. Since 2019 I have also been a Senior Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies at the University of Johannesburg.

My career path as an academic is somewhat atypical. Prior to coming to York in 2002 I lived for two decades in Southern Africa, where I was a journalist and worked as a researcher within community-based and not-for-profit organisations. I maintain strong research links with academic and civil society researchers in East and Southern Africa, and have drawn on these connections to support the work of my graduate students and facilitate research collaborations between York and African partners. My research and supervision areas involve themes of state-society relations in the Global South in the contemporary period of neoliberal globalization. A recurring theme of my work involves the innovative forms of resistance and ‘compliance’ mounted by social constituencies in the face of pressures associated with neoliberal restructuring. Since the 1990s, my academic and civil society research has explored the changing nature of the Southern state, the rise of non-state social actors in the shaping of policy discourses, and the resulting emergence of alternative policy strategies and governance mechanisms. In this regard, I have worked extensively on African labour movements, new media and democratization, and social justice contestations around public health policy. More recently, I have focused on issues of resource governance, using the lenses of political economy and political sociology. In each of these research areas, my work has sought to both fill critical research gaps in the literature, and provide technical and strategic support to popular constituencies engaged in diverse policy-making arenas.

Research areas

Political economy of resource governance; resource nationalism in the Global South; mining, minerals and civil society participation in Africa; developmental states in the Global South; domestic resource mobilization and social policy

Current Research Activities

My current research is concerned with the contemporary resurgence in Africa of ‘resource nationalism’, the use of discretionary policies by governments to regulate and control the extractive industries in order to obtain political and economic benefits. My specific research interests involve the changing role of domestic actors as they engage in innovative forms of political mobilization, social contestation and policy-making around mining and minerals. Much of the established literature on the ‘resource curse’ and the international political economy of resources sees contestation over regulatory reforms through the lens of state-foreign company conflicts. My approach understands regulatory disagreements as increasingly driven and inflected by the competing demands of domestic African players, including local miners and the mining service sector, organized labour and mining communities. It also takes into account the impact of governments’ political vulnerability on policy processes, particularly in the context of the new ‘democratic moment’ in many African countries. Through the convergence of these dynamics, the reform of African extractive industries has become a key component in national political debates.

My current fieldwork in East and Southern Africa asks how new opportunities for the democratisation of mining regulation are unfolding; how the unevenness of structural and institutional capacity among actors is inflecting the policy-making trajectory of formulation-implementation-revision; and, what new forms of socio-economic alliances are emerging to confront coalitions of elite national and foreign actors in the mining sector? By developing comparative case studies of conflicts over the mining fiscal regime, the regulation of small scale mining, and the design of ‘local content’ policy incentives, my work aims to decipher the social, economic and political dynamics behind current resource nationalist policy reforms. It also seeks to identify current ‘best practices’ from its micro-studies of policy conflict and assess their applicability in cross-border contexts in the region. Through research partners in the not-for-profit sector in East and Southern Africa, my research hopes to strengthen the participation and impact of non-state social actors in national and continental resource governance debates.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020 Canadian Mining and Resource Nationalism in Africa: Contestation and Developmental Implications, SSHRC Insight Grant ($243,466); PI
  • 2020 Resource Nationalism in Southern Africa: Policy Challenges and Emerging Opportunities, SSHRC Partnership Development Grant ($198,943); PI
  • 2018 Resource Nationalism in Southern Africa: Emerging Challenges and New Opportunities, SSHRC Connection Grant ($20,436); PI
  • 2013 Zimbabwe: The Politics of Domestic Resource Mobilisation for Social Development, UNRISD PDRM (US $40,000); PI
  • 2013 Facts of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds, University of the Free State, South Africa; co-applicant
  • 2007 Capital flows in the health care sector in east and southern Africa: implications for equity and access to health care, Southern Africa Trust (US$200,000); co-applicant
  • 2007 UNMIS and the impact of humanitarian access on the internal displacement crisis in the Sudan, Norwegian Refugee Council (US$25,000); PI
  • 2006 South Africa into Africa: Investment and its Consequences in the post-Apartheid period, CODESRIA Research Networks Grant (US$32,000); co-applicant

Graduate Supervision

I am accepting graduate students for supervision in the area of natural resources, resource governance and public policy, and encourage analytical approaches which are grounded in critical political economy and political sociology.

Graduate Students Supervised

  • Emmanuel Graham, “A Petro-Developmental State in Ghana” (Politics PhD; commenced 2019)
  • Christopher Stevens, “Different Actors? Private and Public Chinese Capital in Zambia” (Politics PhD; commenced 2019)
  • Stefan Mikuska, “Mobile Phones, Fiscal Politics, and Development: The Political Economy of Money and Finance in Zimbabwe” (Politics PhD; commenced 2017)
  • Alexander Caramento, “The Political Economy of Indigenous Capital Formation and State Transformation in Zambia” (Politics PhD; commenced 2015)
  • Jesse Ovadia, “Development, Transformation and New Imperialism in the Gulf of Guinea: The Political Economy of Oil and Exploitation” (Politics PhD; completed January 2013)
  • Goran Milic, “Developmental States and Democracy: the Case of Singapore” (Politics MA; commenced 2019)
  • Lionel Widmer, “Questioning Botswana’s Democratic Consolidation” (Politics MA; commenced 2018)
  • Cynthia MacDonald, “Rights Based Approaches to Health and the Dilemma of HIV/AIDS in South Africa” (Politics MA; completed May 2015)
  • Wendy Glauser, “International AIDS Organizations and Health Systems: Case Study in Malawi” (Politics MA; completed March 2010)
  • Jason Arsenault, “The Limits of the Local: Obstacles to Civic Participation at the Local Level in Zimbabwe” (Politics MA; completed February 2010)
  • Stephanie David, “A Home in the Slums: Neoliberal reform and housing policy in Lima in the 1990s” (Politics MA; completed November 2009)
  • Gemma Oberth, “Local Responses to a Global Pandemic” (Politics MA; completed September 2009)
  • James Ede, “The Role of Force in Gramscian Theory: An Analysis of the Zimbabwe Crisis” (Politics MA; completed April 2007)
  • Nellie Chang, “Corporate Philanthropy in Public Health: The Pharmaceutical Strategy for Intellectual Property Rights in Africa” (Politics MA; completed September 2004)
  • Toby Moorsam, “Seeds of Dis/Unity: Peasant Production and the State in Zambia” (Politics MA; completed January 2004)

Courses Taught

POLS 6282 International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School (2009)
POLS 6410 The Study of Comparative Politics
POLS 6570 Developmental States in the 21st Century
POLS 6580 Africa: Politics of Continental Crisis
POLS 6585 Civil Society and Democracy in the South

Appointments in Graduate Programs

Graduate Program in Political Science, York
Graduate Program in Development Studies, York
Faculty of Health, York
Senior Research Associate, Graduate Program in Anthropology and Development Studies, University of Johannesburg

Books

Saunders, R. and Nyamunda, T. (eds.) 2016. Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds. Johannesburg/Harare: Wits University Press/Weaver Press.

Saunders, R. 2000. Never the Same Again: Zimbabwe’s Growth Towards Democracy 1980–2000. Harare: ESP.

Saunders, R.1999. Dancing Out of Tune: A History of the Media in Zimbabwe. Harare: ESP.

Saunders, E. Tiffin, E. and Osotimehin, F. 1992. New technologies and enterprise development in Africa. Paris: OECD Development Centre.

Chapters in Books

Saunders, R. Truncated Transitions: Elite Politics, Business Resilience and Continuities of Power in Zimbabwe’s Minerals Sector. In C. Brown, D. Moore and B. Rutherford, (eds.) New Leaders. New Dawn? South Africa and Zimbabwe Under Cyril Ramaphosa and Emmerson Mnangagwa, Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Accepted.

Saunders, R. 2020. The Politics of Resource Bargaining, Social Relations and Institutional Development in Zimbabwe Since Independence. In K. Hujo (ed.) The Politics of Domestic Resource Mobilization for Social Development. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan and UNRISD.

Saunders, R. 2016. Introduction: The Many Facets of Marange’s Diamonds. In R. Saunders and T. Nyamunda (eds.) Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds,/em> Johannesburg/Harare: Wits University Press/Weaver Press.

Saunders, R. 2016. Geologies of Power: Conflict Diamonds, Security Politics and Zimbabwe’s Troubled Transition. In R. Saunders and T. Nyamunda (eds.) Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds Johannesburg/Harare: Wits University Press/Weaver Press.

Saunders, R. 2016. Epilogue: Back to the Beginning. In R. Saunders and T. Nyamunda (eds.) Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds Johannesburg/Harare: Wits University Press/Weaver Press.

Saunders, R. and Chiponda, M. 2016. Holding Ground: Community, Companies and Resistance in Chiadzwa. In R. Saunders and T. Nyamunda (eds.) Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds Johannesburg/Harare: Wits University Press/Weaver Press.

Saunders, R. 2007. Trade Union Struggles for Autonomy and Democracy in Zimbabwe. In J. Kraus (ed.) Trade Unions and the Coming of Democracy in Africa. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Saul, J.S. and Saunders, R. 2005. Mugabe, Gramsci and Zimbabwe at 25. In J.S. Saul (ed.) The Next Liberation Struggle: Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy in Southern Africa. Toronto/Scottsville/New York/London: Between the Lines/UKZN Press/Monthly Review Press/Merlin Press.

Saunders, R. 2001. Striking Ahead: Industrial Action and Labour Movement Development in Zimbabwe. In B. Raftopoulos and L. Sachikonye (eds.) Striking Back: The Labour Movement and the Post-Colonial State in Zimbabwe 1980–2000. Harare: Weaver Press, 2001

Refereed Journal Articles

Saunders, R. and Caramento, A. 2019. Extractive Capitalism and the Resurgence of Resource Nationalism in Southern Africa. ‘Capitalism in Africa Blog’ Review of African Political Economy No.1974 (October 17).

Saunders, R. and Caramento, A. 2018. An extractive developmental state in Southern Africa? The cases of Zambia and Zimbabwe. Third World Quarterly 39(6): 1166-1190.

Saunders, R. 2014. Geologies of Power: Blood Diamonds, Security Politics and Zimbabwe’s Troubled Transition. Journal of Contemporary African Studies 32(3): 378-394.

Saunders, R. 2011. Zimbabwe: Liberation Nationalism—old and born-again. Review of African Political Economy 38(1): 117-128.

Saunders, R. 2008. Crisis, Capital, Compromise: Mining and Empowerment in Zimbabwe. African Sociological Review 12(1): 67-89.

Saunders, R., Miller, D. and Oloyede, O. 2008. South African Corporations and post-Apartheid Expansion in Africa: creating a new regional space. African Sociological Review 12(1): 1-19.

Saunders, R. and Bond, P. 2005. Labor, the State and the Struggle for a Democratic Zimbabwe. Monthly Review 57(7): 42-55.

Saul, J.S. and Saunders, R. 2005. Mugabe, Gramsci and Zimbabwe at 25. International Journal 60(4): 953-75.

Other Publications

Saunders, R. 2019. The Politics of Resource Bargaining, Social Relations and Institutional Development in Zimbabwe Since Independence. UNRISD Working Paper 1-2019, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, Geneva.

Saunders, R. 2018. High Value Minerals and Resource Bargaining in a Time of Crisis: A Case Study on the Diamond Fields of Marange, Zimbabwe. UNRISD Working Paper No. 1-2018, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, Geneva.

Saunders, R. 2017. Contestation and Resource Bargaining in Zimbabwe: The Minerals Sector. UNRISD Working Paper No. 13-2017, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, Geneva.

Saunders, R. 2010. Zimbabwe: Liberation Nationalism, Old and Born Again. At Issue E-Zine. Toronto: Africa Files.

Saunders, R. 2009. Conflict Diamonds from Zimbabwe. Amsterdam: Fatal Transactions/ Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa.

Saunders, R. (ed.) 2008. South Africa in Africa. Guest Editor of Special Issue At Issue E-Zine. Toronto: Africa Files.

Saunders, R. 2008. South Africa in Africa: Restructuring and Resistance. At Issue E-Zine. Toronto: Africa Files.

Saunders, R. 2008. Painful Paradoxes: Mining, Crisis and Regional Capital in Zimbabwe. At Issue E-Zine. Toronto: Africa Files.

Saunders, R. 2007. Mining and Crisis in Zimbabwe. Amsterdam: Fatal Transactions/ Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa.

Since the 1990s I have engaged closely with Canadian, Zimbabwean and international advocacy organisations around issues of social justice; trade unions and democratisation; the right to communicate and media reform; resource governance; and domestic resource mobilization. Before coming to York I participated in civil society campaigns in Southern Africa around trade union, media and health rights. In the 2000s, my public engagement as a researcher has focused increasingly on issues of resource governance. I have collaborated with not-for-profit organisations associated with the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KP), the international framework established in the early 2000s to enhance transparency in the rough diamond trade; and worked with Zimbabwean civil society researchers to address critical research and knowledge gaps in public campaigns for greater transparency and participation. I have worked extensively with inter-governmental and not-for-profit research and advocacy organisations on issues of domestic resource mobilization and community participation in mining. In 2020-23, I will lead a formal partnership involving civil society organisations and academic researchers in Canada and three African countries. A key objective of the network is the provision of evidence-based research and strategic advice to debates on resource governance in East and Southern Africa.


Shirin Shahrokni

Assistant Professor

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the Glendon Campus of York University and a member of the Graduate Program in Sociology.

My research has developed around three interconnected areas: the lived experiences of migrants in France and Canada through intersectional, feminist, and critical race perspectives; contemporary forms of racism and anti-racist action; identity formation processes and issues of belonging in the lives of descendants of immigrants. These research interests have grown out of my personal experiences: like many of my students, my life has been shaped by multiple migratory journeys. I grew up in an Iranian immigrant family in the suburbs of Paris, moved to Montreal at the age of 17, migrated again as an international student in the UK and finally came to Toronto in 2016.

I received my PhD in Sociology from the University of Cambridge and prior to joining York University, I was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Demographic Studies (INED) and a Sociology instructor at Sciences-Po Paris.

My work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals of sociology and race and ethnic studies. My book, Higher Education and Social Mobility in France: Challenges and Possibilities among Descendants of North African Immigrants, published with Routledge in 2020, documents the upward educational mobility trajectories and experiences of young adults of post-colonial migrant descent admitted in the country’s elite academic institutions, the grandes ecoles.

Research Interests

My primary areas of specialization are immigration, institutional and structural racism, gender, anti-racist strategies, identity, anti-racist and decolonial sociology.

I am currently involved in two main research projects. I am one of the co-investigators of a four-year-long Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)-supported collaborative research project that combines survey methods and multi-sited ethnography to examine the racialization experiences of international Asian students across several Canadian universities (Principal Investigator: Jean Michel Montsion).

Secondly, I am in the initial stage of a SSHRC-funded research project which carries out an intersectional analysis of the socio-professional experiences of Canada’s university-educated francophone immigrants in Toronto along gender, ethnic, and racial lines. While the experiences of French-speaking immigrants outside Quebec remain under-researched among scholars of international migration and immigrant integration in Canada, growing statistical evidence reveals that despite holding higher educational qualifications, this population face higher unemployment rates and more precarious employment than their English-speaking counterparts, with racialized francophone women facing even greater obstacles in the Canadian workplace. Drawing on ethnographic methods, the project unpacks the intersecting barriers that Toronto-based francophone immigrants face in the workplace through an intersectional approach and documents the institutional and community-based resources they deploy to counter these.

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020–2022 SSHRC Insight Development Grant / Principal Investigator
    “Undelivered Promises of Immigration? Examining the Integration Pathways of Toronto's University-Educated Immigrants from France through an Intersectional Approach”
    Amount Awarded: $ 47, 974
  • 2019–2023 SSHRC Insight Grant / Co-Investigator
    “Asian International Students to Canadian Universities: Examining the Racialization of Chinese, Indian and Korean Students in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg”
    Principal Investigator: Jean Michel Montsion
    Amount Awarded: $ 285,882

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the areas of sociology of immigration / international migration and sociology of race and ethnic relations from critical race and intersectional perspectives.

Graduate Students Supervised

2020 Anna-Lisa Caruana. Race and Class Inequities in Education
2020. Jasmine Ali (Second Reader).

MA Major Research Paper Second Reader
2020 Student: Victoria Ogley. Graduate program in Sociology.
“Exploring the Return Movement of Children of Hong Kong Immigrants Through the Lens of Transnationalism, Social and Cultural Reproduction, and the Intersections of Class, Race/Racialization”.

MA Major Research Paper Supervisor
2019 Student: Kirti Sharma. Masters in Public and International Affairs. “Mapping the Healthy Immigrant Effect in Canada”.

MA Major Research Paper Second Reader
2019 Student: Justine Wallace. Masters in Public and International Affairs. ““We’re Not All Nice”: Exploring Ideological constructions of Canada and “Canadianness” from the Perspectives of Black Women of the Second Generation.

PhD Committee
2019–… Nadiya Ali. “The Muslim Art Scene in NYC & Toronto: A Critical Race Comparative Approach”, Graduate program in Sociology.

Courses Taught

Undergraduate Teaching

SOCI 2510 Perspectives sociologiques
SOCI 4667 The Sociology of International Migration: Contemporary Issues and Debates
SOCI 4642 International Perspectives on Race and Ethnic Relations
SOCI 2680 Relations Sexe/Genre

Graduate Teaching

PIA 6603 Migration mondiale et les lois et politiques du Canada
SOCI 6665 Sociologies of Global Capitalism
SOCI 6760 Race and Ethnicity

Books

Shahrokni, S. (2020). Higher Education and Social Mobility in France: Challenges and Possibilities among Descendants of North African Immigrants, Routledge

Chapters in Books

Shahrokni, Shirin (with Jules Naudet). 2019. “The Class Identity Negotiations of Upwardly Mobile Individuals Amongst Whites and the Racial ‘Other’: a USA-France Comparison”, In Elites and People: Challenges to Democracy, Comparative Social Research Book Series, Vol. 34, pp. 137–158, Engelstad, F, Gulbrandsen, T, Mangset, M, Teigen, M (Ed) Emerald Publishing Limited, 10.1108/S0195-631020190000034007

Refereed Journal Articles

Shahrokni, Shirin. 2019. “The Transnational Career Aspirations of Descendants of Maghrebi Immigrants”, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 45 (3): 437-454, 10.1080/1369183X.2017.1394179

Shahrokni, Shirin. 2018. “The Collective Roots and Rewards of Upward Educational Mobility”, British Journal of Sociology 69 (4): 1175-1193, 10.1111/1468-4446.12349

Shahrokni, Shirin. 2015. “The Minority Culture of Mobility of Upwardly Mobile Descendants of North African Immigrants in France”, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 38 (7): 1050-1067, 10.1080/01419870.2014.964280

Non-Refereed Journal Articles

Shahrokni, Shirin. 2007. « Identification transnationale chez les jeunes adultes iraniens de ‘seconde génération’ vivant à Montréal », Diversite Urbaine 7 (1): 69-85, 10.7202/016270ar


James Sheptycki

Professor

  •  | McLaughlin College, 034 |
  •    ext. 53726 |
  •    jshep@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile


Brian Singer

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Hira Singh

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


Brenda Spotton Visano

Professor

Faculty Profile


Glenn Stalker

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


photo of Mark ThomasMark P. Thomas

Associate Professor

BA Political Science & Sociology, Carleton University (1994),
MA Sociology, University of Guelph (1997),
Ph.D. Sociology, York University (2003)

Faculty Profile

Biography

Mark P. Thomas is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology. He is former Director of the Global Labour Research Centre at York, and has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Political Economy, Carleton University, and a Visiting Researcher at Institut de Recherches Sociologiques, Université de Genève. Current areas of research include: working time and new technologies; labour, austerity, and populism in urban North America; and the enforcement of employment standards legislation in Canada. He has published numerous books and edited collections and his research has been published in journals including Antipode, Economic & Industrial Democracy, Economic & Labour Relations Review, Journal of Industrial Relations, Labor Studies Journal, Labour/Le Travail, and Studies in Political Economy.

Research areas

Political Economy; Economic Sociology; Sociology of Work and Labour; Political Sociology

Current Research Activities

My current areas of research include projects on work, time, and new technologies, labour, austerity, and populism in urban North America, and the enforcement of employment standards legislation in Canada, all of which are supported by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

Recent Research Grants

Clocked In—Work, Time, and Technology in the Digital Economy. The relationships between new digital technologies and the organization of working time. SSHRC Insight Grant. Awarded 2019 (Sole investigator)

Canada Labour Code Data Analysis Infrastructure. Creation of a database of enforcement statistics related to the Canada Labour Code. Canada Foundation for Innovation. Awarded 2017. (Co-investigator)

Spaces of Labour in Moments of Urban Populism. The rise of populism in the context of the politics of austerity, and the implications for labour movements. SSHRC Insight Grant. Awarded 2016 (Co-investigator)

Closing the Enforcement Gap: Improving Employment Standards for Workers in Precarious Jobs. The enforcement of employment standards, with a focus on connections between an ‘enforcement gap’ and conditions of precarious employment. SSHRC Partnership Grant. Awarded 2013 (Co-investigator)

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision who are pursuing research in areas of political economy, economic sociology, and sociology of work and labour.

Graduate Students Supervised

Rawan Abdelbaki (PhD, Sociology) “Locating Class in Transnational Lives: A Case Study of ‘Highly-Skilled’ Immigrants in the GTA.” In progress

Howard Steinberg (PhD, Social & Political Thought) “Critical Theory and Political Economy of Alienation: Precarious Work in the Arts.” In progress

Kritee Ahmed (PhD, Sociology) “Now in Service: Public Transit Work and the Customer Service Ethos in Toronto, Canada and London, U.K.” In progress

Gloria Adagbon (PhD, Sociology) “The ‘Dream’ Team? Immigrants, Multilevel Marketing and Integration.” In progress

Adam King (PhD, Sociology) “The Making and Reproduction of Male Working Class Identity in a Mining Town.” Completed February 2019

Benjamin Christensen (PhD, Sociology) “The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics, and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016.” Completed December 2016

Jasmin Hristov (PhD, Sociology) “Violent Systems of Capital Accumulation: Paramilitarism and the Colombian Armed Conflict.” Completed May 2013

Seulsam Lee (MA, Sociology) “At the Intersection of Precarious Work and Immigration Status: Structural Vulnerability, Resistance, and Migrant Women in Canada.” In progress

Angela Ostrikoff (MA, Sociology) “Breaking Ground and Making Her-story: Reimagining ‘Business as Usual’ Through Women’s Entprepreneurship.” Completed August 2020

Nathali Borthei (MA, Sociology) “Give it to Me Straight: “Professionalism” and Black Hair Politics in the Workplace.” Completed December 2016

Navneet Aujla (MA, Sociology) “Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women.” Completed August 2016

Rawan Abdelbaki (MA, Sociology) “Neoliberalism and Canadian Immigration: Rethinking the Land of (In)Opportunity.” Completed October 2014

Christie Thorkildson (MA, Sociology) “Precarious Employment and Well-being: Where Is Precarious Employment in Indices of Well-being from Advanced Capital States?” Completed August 2014

Blair Fix (MES, Environmental Studies) “Human Activity, Energy and Money in the United States: Connecting the Biophysical Economy with its Pecuniary Image.” Completed September 2013

Angelina Duhig (MA, Sociology) “Examining Solidarity in an Individualized Economy: From Industrialization to Advanced Global Capitalism.” Completed May 2013

Kristin Cuipa (MA, Sociology) “Post-Neoliberal Alternatives? Exploring New Left Government Responses to Neoliberalism in Latin America.” Completed July 2011

Carmen Teeple Hopkins (MA, Sociology) “Mao's Solidarity Campaign is Long Over! China’s Rise into Mauritius Through the Jinfei Economic Trade and Cooperation Zone.” Completed June 2010

Nishant Upadhyay (MA, Social & Political Thought) “Building Consciousness and Redefining Politics: Going Beyond Class.” Completed April 2010

Carlo Fanelli (MA, Sociology) “Globalization or Capitalism? Six Perspectives on the Changing Political Economy and Relevance of the Nation-State.” Completed August 2008

Etienne Godard-Flamand (MA, Sociology) “Escapes from the ideal/material dichotomy: Reconsidering the Antagonistic Relation Between Marx’s and Weber’s Models of Historical Change.” August Completed 2008

Courses Taught

Economic Sociology, SOCI 6664
Sociologies of Global Capitalism, SOCI 6665

Books

Vosko, Leah F., Guliz Akkaymak, Rebecca Casey, Shelley Condratto, John Grundy, Alan Hall, Alice Hoe, Kiran Mirchandani, Andrea M. Noack, Urvashi Soni-Sinha, Mercedes Steedman, Mark P. Thomas, Eric M. Tucker (2020) Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Thomas, Mark P., Leah Vosko, Carlo Fanelli, and Olena Lyubchenko (eds.) (2019) Change and Continuity: Canadian Political Economy in the New Millennium,/em>. Kingston & Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Brock, Debi, Aryn Martin, Rebecca Raby, and Mark P. Thomas (eds.) (2019) Power and Everyday Practices, 2nd Edition. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Jackson, Andrew, and Mark P. Thomas (2017) Work and Labour in Canada: Critical Issues. 3rd Edition. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Brock, Deborah, Rebecca Raby, and Mark P. Thomas (eds.). (2012) Power and Everyday Practices. Toronto: Nelson.

Pupo, Norene, and Mark Thomas (eds.) (2010) Interrogating the New Economy: Restructuring Work in the 21st Century. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Thomas, Mark P. (2009) Regulating Flexibility: The Political Economy of Employment Standards. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Select Refereed Journal Articles

Thomas, Mark P. (2020) “‘For the People’? Regulating Employment Standards in an Era of Right-Wing Populism.” Studies in Political Economy 101(2) (September), 135-54.

Thomas, Mark P., Shelley Condratto, Danielle Landry, and Mercedes Steedman (2020) “Flexibility for Who? Working Time, the Ontario Employment Standards Act, and the Experiences of Workers in Low-Wage and Precarious Jobs.” Relations Industrielles / Industrial Relations 75(1) (March), 78-100.

Thomas, Mark P., and Steven Tufts (2020) “Blue Solidarity: Police Unions, Race and Authoritarian Populism in North America.” Work, Employment & Society 34(1) (January), 126-44.

Thomas, Mark P., Leah F. Vosko, Eric Tucker, Mercedes Steedman, Andie Noack, John Grundy, Mary Gellatly, and Lisa Leinveer (2019) “The Employment Standards Enforcement Gap and the Overtime Pay Exemption in Ontario.” Labour/Le Travail: Journal of Canadian Labour Studies 84. Fall (December), 25-51.

Thomas, Mark, and Steve Tufts (2016) “’Enabling Dissent’: Contesting Austerity and Right-Wing Populism in Toronto, Canada.” Economic and Labour Relations Review 27(1) March, 29-45.

Thomas, Mark, and Steven Tufts (2016) “Austerity, Right Populism and the Crisis of Labour in Canada.” Antipode 48(1) January, 212-30.

Thomas, Mark (2011) “Global Industrial Relations? Framework Agreements and the Regulation of International Labor Standards”. Labor Studies Journal 36(2), 269-87.

Thomas, Mark (2007) “Toyotaism Meets the 60 Hour Work Week: Coercion, ‘Consent’ and the Regulation of Working Time.” Studies in Political Economy 80, 105-28.

Thomas, Mark (2006) “Union Strategies to Re-Regulate Work Time”. Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society 9, 1-15.

Thomas, Mark (2004) “Setting the Minimum: Ontario’s Employment Standards in the Postwar Years, 1944-1968.” Labour/Le Travail: Journal of Canadian Labour Studies 54, 49-82.

Select Chapters in Books

Thomas, Mark P. and Leah F. Vosko (2019) “Canadian Political Economy in the New Millennium.” In M.P. Thomas, L.F. Vosko, C. Fanelli, and O. Lyubchenko (eds.) Change and Continuity: Canadian Political Economy in the New Millennium. Kingston & Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 3-22.

Thomas, Mark P. (2019) “Being ‘Middle Class’?” In D. Brock, A. Martin, R. Raby, and M.P. Thomas (eds.) Power and Everyday Practices, 2nd Edition. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 171-92.

Thomas, Mark (2016) “Producing and Contesting ‘Unfree Labour’ Through the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program.” In A. Choudry and A. Smith (eds.) Unfree Labour? Struggles of Migrant and Immigrant Workers in Canada. Oakland: PM Press, 21-36.

Thomas, Mark (2016) “Global Unions, Global Framework Agreements and the Transnational Regulation of Labour Standards”. In Robert Lambert and Andrew Herod (eds.) Neoliberal Capitalism & Precarious Work: Ethnographies of Accommodation and Resistance. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 277-302.

Thomas, Mark (2012) “Employment Standards ‘Modernization’ in Canada”. In C. Warhurst, F. Carre, P. Findlay, and C. Tilly (eds.) Are Bad Jobs Inevitable? Trends, Determinants and Responses to Job Quality in the Twenty-First Century. Houndsmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 224-39.

Thomas, Mark (2012) “Class, State and Power: Unpacking Social Relations in Contemporary Capitalism.” In D. Brock, R. Raby, and M. Thomas (eds.) Power and Everyday Practices. Toronto: Nelson, 110-132.

Thomas, Mark (2012) “Thinking Global: ‘The West and the Rest’.” In D. Brock, R. Raby, and M. Thomas (eds.) Power and Everyday Practices. Toronto: Nelson, 247-51.

Thomas, Mark (2011) “Labour Migration and Temporary Work: Canada’s Foreign Worker Programs in the ‘New Economy’. Reprinted in V. Shalla (ed.) Working in a Global Era: Canadian Perspectives. 2nd Edition. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press, 213-38.

Thomas, Mark (2011) “Global Unions, Local Labour, and the Regulation of International Labour Standards: Mapping ITF Labour Rights Strategies”. In M. Serrano, E. Xhafa, and M. Fichter (eds.) Trade Union and the Global Crisis: Labour’s Visions, Strategies and Responses. Geneva: International Labour Organization, 81-95.

Thomas, Mark (2011) “Regulating Labour Standards in the Global Economy: Emerging Forms of Global Governance”. In G. Teeple and S. McBride (eds.), Relations of Global Power: Neoliberal Order and Disorder. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 95-117.

Thomas, Mark (2010) “Neoliberalism, Racialization, and the Regulation of Employment Standards”. In S. Braedley and M. Luxton (eds.) Neoliberalism and Everyday Life. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 68-89.

Thomas, Mark (2010) “Labour Migration and Temporary Work: Canada’s Foreign Worker Programs in the ‘New Economy’. In N. Pupo and M. Thomas (eds.), Interrogating the New Economy: Restructuring Work in the 21st Century. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 149-72.

Thomas, Mark (2008) “Working Time and Labour Control in the Toyota Production System.” In R. O’Brien (ed.) Solidarity First: Canadian Workers and Social Cohesion. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 86-105.

Other Publications

Thomas, Mark P., Shelley Condratto, Danielle Landry, Mercedes Steedman (2020) “The Devil’s Choice: Precarious Work and the Politics of Time”. Our Times,/em> Winter 2019–20, 32-39.

Vosko, Leah, John Grundy, Eric Tucker, Andrea M. Noack, Mary Gellatly, Rebecca Casey, Mark P. Thomas, Guliz Akkaymak, and Parvinder Hira-Friesen (2017) Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: An Agenda for Change.

Vosko, Leah, John Grundy, Eric Tucker, Andrea M. Noack, Alan Hall, Mark P. Thomas, Rebecca Casey, Kiran Mirchandani, and, Guliz Akkaymak (2016) Improving Employment Standards and Their Enforcement in Ontario: A Research Brief Addressing Options Identified in the Interim Report of the Changing Workplaces Review. Submitted to Ontario Ministry of Labour, October 2016.

Vosko, Leah, Andrea Noack, and Mark Thomas (2016) “How Far Does the Employment Standards Act, 2000 Extend and What Are the Gaps in Coverage? An Empirical Analysis of Archival and Statistical Data”. Changing Workplaces Review. Toronto: Ministry of Labour. Submitted February 2016.

Thomas, Mark (2010) “Flexibility or Insecurity: Struggles over Labour Standards in Ontario.” Relay: A Socialist Project Review, No. 29, January–March, 18-22.


photo of Leah VoskoLeah F. Vosko

Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Gender & Work (Tier 1), Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada

BA Trent University (1992),
MA Simon Faser University (1994),
PhD York University (1998)

Faculty Profile

Biography

I am a Professor in the Department of Politics (Cross-Appointed to graduate Programs including Sociology) and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Gender & Work. My areas of expertise include gender, work, and employment, citizenship & migration, social policy, political and economic sociology, and social welfare. My previous and ongoing research focusses on understanding the nature and dimensions of precarious employment. I am currently investigating the rise of international mobility programs in Canada and internationally, the institutionalization of temporariness and deportability among workers labouring transnationally, the rebuilding of workplace protections, and the analysis of public policy through a feminist political economy lens. I embed the national and global problems of precarious employment and precarious migration status in a feminist political economy approach, which highlights how precariousness is shaped by social relations of gender, race, citizenship status, (dis)ability and age as well as industry, occupation and geography.

In addition to my independent research, I have led a number of multi-year collaborative initiatives, including a SSHRC Community-University Research Alliance on Precarious Employment (2000–2005) and a SSHRC Partnership Grant (2013–present) on employment standards enforcement in Ontario in comparative context. I have also led the development of four databases funded by Canada Foundation for Innovation: the Gender and Work Database (GWD), the Comparative Perspectives Database (CPD), the Employment Standards Database (ESD), and the Canada Labour Code-Data Analysis Infrastructure (CLC-DAI). These database tools make statistical data on work and labour publicly available in accessible formats to those who otherwise would not be able to access it.

Research areas

Precarious employment and labour market insecurity, (un)employment insurance, employment standards legislation and enforcement, migrant work, labour rights and labour/union organizing in Canada and globally, feminist political economy.

Current Research Activities

My current research focuses on two domains of employment policy – labour protections for temporary migrant workers and the enforcement of employment standards. In both areas, I emphasize the relationship between dimensions of precariousness, gender relations and citizenship boundaries. Both inquiries probe the impediments to labour market membership, particularly for historically marginalized social groups.

These projects build on my early research into precarious employment. My first sole-authored book Temporary Work (2000, UTP), my edited collection Precarious Employment (2006, MQUP), and my leadership of a SSHRC-funded Community-University Research Alliance on Contingent Employment helped refocus dialogue on how the social relations of gender and citizenship shape labour market insecurity. Precariousness, I show, cuts across different forms of employment, necessitating policy interventions that extend beyond shoring up standard employment (a dominant regulatory response) to address market insecurity more effectively.

My second sole-authored book, Managing the Margins (2010, OUP), forwarded an internationalized relational understanding of precarious employment. Liberating Temporariness? (2014, MQUP), a co-edited collection, advances scholarly understandings of temporariness as it relates to migration status in relation to work, security, and settlement in Canada and elsewhere.

Focusing on temporary migrant labour, my latest sole authored book, Disrupting Deportability (Cornell University Press, 2019), investigates the struggle of a group of Mexican SAWP (Season Agricultural Worker Program) participants in British Columbia and how the ever-present threat of removal—or deportability—destabilizes legally-authorized temporary migrant agricultural workers. The book concludes by proposing a new approach to imagining migrant work programs in ways that protect workers’ well-being based on extensive field research undertaken over nearly a decade, as well as analysis of case law and administrative data on the SAWP. Flowing from this investigation, I am currently developing a new research project connected to temporary labour migration, examining the growth of mobility programs in Canada and internationally and querying the extent to which such mobility programs represent a genuine departure from the exploitative conditions of temporary foreign worker programs.

Alongside pursuing this independent research, I also recently served as Principal Investigator of a SSHRC Partnership Grant, involving 16 academic and community partners, focused on employment standards enforcement in Ontario. The project involved extensive in-depth interviews of key informants (workers and government officials), analysis of previously untapped administrative data from the Ontario Ministry of Labour, and participation in the Ontario government’s review of the Employment Standards Act in 2016. Out of this partnership, I co-authored a comprehensive study of employment standards enforcement, Closing the Enforcement Gap: Improving Employment Standards Protections for People in Precarious Jobs (University of Toronto Press, 2020). Closing the Enforcement Gap contextualizes the case of the enforcement gap in Ontario by reference to other national and global examples of employment standards models and their deficiencies, such as Quebec, United States, Britain, and Australia. Related to this project, I have been involved in the development of three database tools funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation: the Gender and Work Database (GWD), the Comparative Perspectives Database (CPD), and the Employment Standards Database (ESD). These databases make available data on precarious labour and employment standards enforcement otherwise not previously accessible to students and policymakers. A fourth tool also funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation—the Canada Labour Code-Data Analysis Infrastructure—extends the Partnership Grant’s analysis of employment standards enforcement to sectors under federal jurisdiction. Based on data from this project, I am collaborating with a team of junior and senior scholars looking into a contested legal concept known as “the core of Indianness” engaged by the Canadian courts to regulate Indigenous labours.

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, I have become involved in a number of initiatives related to the pandemic. I was invited to provide feedback to the Government of Ontario’s Provincial Committee on Jobs and Recovery My report focused in particular on the situation of precariously employed workers in Canada and provided advice on Income Support, Employment Standards, and Health and Safety in post-pandemic Ontario. Together with other researchers and scholars, I am also a founding member of the Migrant Worker Health Expert Working Group (migrantworkers.ca), which brings attention to the unsafe working conditions of temporary migrant workers on Canadian farms and provides evidence-based guidance to government agencies to ensure their health and safety is taken seriously during the pandemic (and after). As part of this working group, in 2020 I intervened in the SAWP bilateral negotiations between Canada and Mexico and Canada and participating countries in the Caribbean. Together with Professor Eric Tucker (Osgoode Law School), I am also involved in research exploring the expansion of sick and caregiving leave and pay provisions that have been enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada in light of the pre-existing statutory regime, which disadvantaged the most precariously employed workers who are disproportionately women, youth, recent immigrants, rural workers, and sales and service workers.

Selected Research Grants

Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Impact Award (Insight), 2019.

Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Awards to Scholarly Publication Program, Publication grant for manuscript “Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs,” Principal Investigator, July 2019–July 2020.

Canadian Foundation for Innovation, John Evans Leadership Opportunity Fund Grant, “Canada Labour Code Data Analysis Infrastructure (CLC-DAI),” Principal Investigator, January 2018–December 2020.

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Partnership Grant, “Closing the Enforcement Gap: Improving Employment Standards for Workers in Precarious Jobs,” Principal Investigator, March 2013–March 2018.

Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Leadership Opportunity Fund Grant, “Global Employment Standards Database (GESD),” Principal Investigator, January 2012–December 2016.

Graduate Supervision

As a faculty member who is cross-appointed to several graduate programs, and whose work is interdisciplinary, I take a hands-on approach to supervising graduate students, engaging them on multiple levels. Historically, I have supervised and participated in the committees of PhD and MA students in Sociology across a wide range of fields and topics, and I am accepting new students working in areas related to my research profile.

Graduate Students Supervised

Postdoctoral Fellows Supervised
In progress

Adam King Dr. King holds a PhD in Sociology from York University. He is working under the auspices of both the Canada Labour Code-Data Infrastructure Analysis project and the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, participating in qualitative research examining how federal labour standards inspectors undertake labour inspection and how this shapes enforcement of Part III of the Canada Labour Code. 2019–Present
Victoria Osten Dr. Osten received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Ottawa. She is involved in working on both the Canada Labour Code-Data Analysis Infrastructure project and the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, examining how federal labour standards inspectors undertake labour inspection and how this shapes enforcement of Part III of the Canada Labour Code. 2018–Present

Completed

Guliz Akkaymak Dr. Akkaymak received her PhD in Sociology & Migration and Ethnic
Relations from the University of Western Ontario. She is working under my supervision on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, particularly its Working Groups on the Enforcement Practices of the Ministry of Labour and Archives & Policy. 2016–2018
Enda Brophy Dr. Brophy received his PhD in Sociology from Queen’s University. He
was awarded a two-year SSHRC-funded postdoctoral fellowship to work under my direction on a project on the regulation of parasubordinate work (self-employment under conditions of dependency) in Italy, exploring potential applications in the Canadian context. 2008–2010
Rebecca Casey Dr. Casey received her PhD in Sociology from McMaster University. She worked under my supervision on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, contributing to the development of a survey of Ontarians’ experiences of the effects of employment standards regulations on their working lives as well as the utilization of administrative data from the Ontario Ministry of Labour. 2015–2018
Deborah Cowen Dr. Cowen earned her PhD in Geography at the University of Toronto. She was awarded a two-year SSHRC-funded postdoctoral fellowship to work under my supervision to examine the relationship between labour market insecurity and national security exploring the case of port workers in Canada and the United States. 2005–2007
Cynthia Cranford Dr. Cranford earned her PhD in Sociology at University of Southern
California. She was awarded a three-year postdoctoral fellowship to work under my supervision in conjunction with the SSHRC Community University Research Alliance on Contingent Work that I directed on the topic of Contingent Work in Community-Based Care: The Case of
Caregivers for People with Disabilities. 2001–2003
Mark Easton Dr. Easton received his PhD in Sociology at the University of Toronto. He worked under my supervision on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnerships, particularly its Statistics & Survey working group. 2018–2020.
Karen Foster A graduate of Carleton University, as a postdoctoral fellow Karen Foster examined gender and generation in the experience of precarious employment in Canada. 2011–2012
Sylvia Fuller Dr. Fuller earned her PhD in Sociology at Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA. She was awarded a two-year SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship as well as the Aileen D. Ross Fellowship, awarded to an outstanding postdoctoral fellow in Sociology whose work concerns poverty and inequality in Canada and the United States. 2004–2006
John Grundy Dr. Grundy received his PhD in Political Science from York University. He worked under my supervision on the creation of an Employment Standards Database. 2015–2018
Alice Hoe Dr. Hoe received her PhD in Sociology at the University of Toronto. She worked under my supervision on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, particularly its Statistics & Survey Working Group. 2016–2018
Parvinder Hira-Friesen Dr. Hira-Friesen received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Calgary. She worked under my supervision on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, contributing to the development of a survey of Ontarians’ experiences of the effects of employment standards regulations on their working lives as well as the utilization of administrative data from the Ontario Ministry of Labour. 2016–2017
Jaqueline Krikorian Dr. Krikorian earned her PhD in Political Science at the University of Toronto. She was awarded a two-year SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship to study the implementation of the side-agreements on labour and environment under the NAFTA and their implications for workers in precarious employment. 2004–2006
Katherine Laxer Dr. Laxer received her PhD in Sociology from York University. As a
postdoctoral visitor she studied precarious employment in comparative contexts and contributed to the development of the CPD. 2014–2015
Angran Li Dr. Li received his PhD from the University of Connecticut. He was involved in working on the Canada Labour Code-Data Analysis Infrastructure, as well as the other database tools: Gender and Work Database, Comparative Perspectives Database, and the Employment Standards Database. 2017–2019
Kelly Pike Dr. Pike received her PhD in Industrial Relations from Cornell University. As a postdoctoral fellow, she studied employment standards enforcement in Canada. 2012–2013
Deepa Rajkumar Dr. Rajkumar received her PhD in Political Science from York University, Toronto. She was a recipient of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship funded by the Government of Ontario’s Ministry of Research and Innovation and York University to work on a project examining social exclusion among new immigrants in Canada (co-supervision). 2009–2011
Justyna Sempruch Dr. Sempruch earned her PhD in Comparative Literature at the University of British Columbia. She was awarded a three-year Swiss National Science Foundation post-doctoral fellowship to undertake a comparative study of parenthood policies in Canada and Switzerland. 2005–2007
Elliot Siemiatycki Dr. Siemiatycki received his PhD in Human Geography from the University of British Columbia. As a postdoctoral visitor, he worked on the Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs research partnership, studying the enforcement practices of Ministry of Labour Officials in Ontario. 2013–2015
Bonnie Slade Dr. Slade received her PhD in Adult Education from the OISE/University of Toronto. She was awarded a two-year SSHRC-funded postdoctoral fellowship to work under my direction on a project examining how immigrants translate volunteer work into job experience in Canada. 2008–2010
Deatra Walsh Dr. Walsh received her PhD in Sociology from Memorial University. As a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow, she studied work-related mobility. 2012–2013
Marion Werner Dr. Werner received her PhD in Geography from the University of Minnesota. She was awarded a two-year SSHRC-funded postdoctoral fellowship to work under my direction on a project on the regulation of temporary agency work on the US-Mexico border. 2010–2012

Doctoral Students Supervised
In progress

Nicole Bernhardt PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Topic: Assessing Charter Agreements between the Ontario Human Rights Commission and Public Institutions: Towards Equity for Women of Colour
Tyler Chartrand PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Topic: Canada’s Temporary Migration Program and Information Technology Systems
Keelin Griffin PhD Comprehensives (in progress), Supervisor, Sociology, York University
Topic: Parental Leaves and the Challenge of Gender Equality
Vincci Li PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Social and Political Thought, York University
Topic: Crowdfunding and the Question of Social Provision
Olena Lyubchenko PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Gender Order in Transition?: Social Reproduction in Post-Soviet Russia
Tka Pinnock PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervision, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: "Bread and Butter" of Black Life: Everyday Living in the Tourist Town of Ocho Rios, Jamaica
Corey Ranford-Robinson PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Governing Hospitality, Regulation Mobility: The Transnational Field of Border Control and Migration Management
Cynthia Spring PhD Thesis (in progress), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Topic: Investing in the Future?: Debt, Mobility, and Post-Secondary Education in Ontario and Quebec
Thania Vega PhD Thesis (in progress). Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University.
Topic: The Social Construction of Skill in the Incorporation of Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs) into the Nursing Workforce

Completed

Simon Black PhD Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, February 23, 2016
Topic: Community Unionism: A Comparison of Toronto and New York
Julie Dowsett PhD Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, May 7, 2014
Topic: Commodification, Desire and Female Subjectivity
John Grundy PhD Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, October 1, 2012
Title: Administering Employability: Employment Service Delivery in the Era of Active Labour Market Policy
Rebecca Hall PhD Thesis (complete) Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 22, 2017
Title: Diamonds are Forever: A Decolonizing, Feminist Approach to Diamond Mining in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Awarded the Governor General’s Gold Medal 2018 and the Mary MacEwan Award for the Best Thesis in Feminist Studies 2018
Sandra Ignagni PhD Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, May 18, 2012
Title: Is Leisure Working? The Gendered Regulation of Working Time and Leisure in Canada, 1950–2006
David Lavin PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Sociology, York University, September 2013
Topic: Community Unionism
Tobin LeBlanc-Haley PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, York University, February 15, 2017
Title: Transinstitutionalization: A Feminist Political Economy Analysis of Ontario’s Public Mental Health Care System
reese simpkins PhD Thesis (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, December 3, 2012
Title: Making trans multiple: movement, materiality, becoming

Committee Member
In progress

Vincent Collins PhD Thesis, Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University.
Title: Canada's Just Transition: What policy failures and grassroots labour organizing tell us about how to tackle intersecting climate, health and inequality crises?
Angelica Hasbon PhD Thesis, Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Intersectional Welfare Experiences: Thinking Through Racialized Gendered Experiences Across Welfare Regimes
Hleliswa Luhlanga PhD Thesis, Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Exploring Women’s Political Ambition Within the Confines of an
Absolute Monarchy: A Comparative Analysis of Pre-Colonial (1899 to 1968) and Post -Independence Constitution Swaziland (2005 to 2018)
Kaitlin Peters PhD Thesis (in progress), Second Committee member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University Title: The Ontario Federation of Labour and Coalition-Building Praxis: Struggling Against the Exploitation of Unpaid Labour?
Nadjie Danielle Magsumbo PhD Thesis (in progress), Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies York University
Title: The Filipino Labour Diaspora: Affective Citizenship and Authoritarian Regimes
Sarah Redikopp PhD Thesis (in progress), Committee Members, Gender, Feminist & Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Intersectional Analysis of Self-Harm in Toronto Emergency Departments

Completed

Susan Braedley PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, January 20, 2009
Title: Emergencies of Care: Masculinities and Neo-Liberalism at Work
Nicole Cohen PhD Thesis (complete) Second Committee Member, Communications and Culture, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, February 13, 2013
Title: Negotiating Commodification: The Media Labour of Freelance Writers
Karine Côté-Boucher PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, November 29, 2013
Title: Regulation of Transport Industry in North America
Silvia D’Addario PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Committee Member, Geography, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 6, 2012
Title: Finding Home: Exploring the Intersections of Paid and Unpaid Work and the Relations Between Place of Residence and Work Place for Transnational Care Workers in Toronto
Monnah Green PhD Comprehensives (complete), Second Committee Member, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Women’s Experiences on Social Assistance
Krista Johnston PhD Comprehensives (complete), Committee Member, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, 2004
Bernice Kuzynski Ph.D. Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, July 2006
Title: Development Lessons in Political Economy from a Micro Perspective—A Case Study of Haulover, RAAS, Nicaragua
Samantha Ladner PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, York University, Faculty of Graduate Studies, March 2008
Title: Agency Time: Time, Work and Home in Interactive Agencies
Kate Laxer PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2014
Title: Gender, Precarious Employment and Ancillary Work in Health
Yuzhen Liu PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, May 2011
Title: Crossing Boundaries: Labour Market Experiences and Gendered Negotiations of Chinese Immigrant Women in Canada
Sarah Macharia PhD Thesis (complete), Internal External Committee Member, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, March 2008
Title: Gender and the Informal Economy in Kenya
Janine Muller PhD Comprehensives (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Social Policy of Work and Health: Investigating Working Conditions of Home Care Workers
Paula Pinto PhD Comprehensives and Thesis (complete), Second Committee Member, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2009
Title: The Diversity—Equality Riddle: Interrogating Disability, Motherhood, Citizenship and Rights
Emily Van Der Meulen PhD Thesis (complete), Internal External Committee Member, Graduate Programme in Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2009
Title: Sex for Work: How Policy Affects Sexual Labour, An Argument for Labour Legitimacy and Social Change
Melissa White PhD Comprehensives Committee Member (complete), Graduate Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, 2007

Other
In progress

Albert Bannerji PhD Thesis (complete), Dean’s Representative, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, December 13, 2010
Title: On the Frontlines: Structural Violence in Canadian Long-term Residential Care
Sylvia Fuller PhD Thesis (complete), External Examiner, Sociology, Rutgers University, March 30, 2004
Title: Broken Ladders or Boundaryless Careers? Job Instability and Worker Well-Being
Wendy Paterson PhD Thesis (complete), External Examiner, Social Science, New Castle University, Australia, 2001
Title: ‘A Desire for Social Justice’: Equal Pay, The International Labour Organization and Australian Government Policy, 1919–1975, July 2003
Eloy Rivas-Sanchez PhD Thesis (complete), External Examiner, Sociology & Anthropology, Carleton University, 2019
Title: Deportability, Labour and Health in Canada’s Late Capitalism

MA Students Supervised
In progress

Merna Fatohi M.A. (in progress), Supervisor, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Topic: Workers Compensation Legislation and the Case of Fatalities

Completed

Loren Aytona M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Communication Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, Summer 2016
Title: Unpaid Internships In Ontario and the Rise of Precarious Employment
Jan Borowy M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, April 2003
Title: “If we are so essential, why are we part-time and paid so low?”: Restructuring and Resistance to Precarious Work in the Ontario Public Service
Nicole Cohen M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, July 2006
Title: Working Youth and Worker Centres: Organizing Space for Resistance
Jesse Goldstein M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, April 2006
Topic: ‘The Benefit Bank’: Rethinking Work and Welfare in the U.S.A.
Cory Jansson M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, February 2010
Topic: A Comparative Analysis of Emerging Policies on Temporary Migration for Employment in Canada and Sweden
Tammie Hyde M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, January 12, 2006
Title: What ‘Moves’ Child Care Policy?: A Comparative Analysis of Advocacy and Policy in Ontario and Quebec
Abetha Mahallingham M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, December 2006
Title: Welcome but Underutilized and Undervalued: Exploring a Critical Anti-Racist Feminist Framework for the Integration and Utilization of Professionally Skilled Immigrant Women into their Desired Occupations in the Canadian Labour Force
Beth O’Connor M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2009
Title: ‘Bad Girls’ or Bad Policies? Social Assistance and the Moral Regulation of Teenage Mothers
Delia Popo Harding M.A (complete). Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2018.
Title: Making SAWP Workers Precarious Through Denying Access to Collective Bargaining Rights: A Comparative Policy Analysis of Quebec and Ontario SAWP Policies & Labour Codes
Randy Robinson M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2013
Title: Gender, Work, and Alcohol: Feminization and Transformation at the Liquor Control Board of Ontario
Riva Soucie M.A. (complete), Co-Supervisor, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2005
Title: Novice to Expert: The Changing Nature of Expertise Acquisition in Canadian Nursing
Cynthia Spring M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, August 2017
Title: What’s the Worth of “Women’s Work”? On Pay Equity, Job Evaluation, and Privatization in Ontario’s Healthcare Industry
Melissa White M.A. (complete), Supervisor, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2005
Title: Post-9/11 Movements for Citizenship Status in Canada

Committee Memeber
In progress

Pablo Goboy M.A. (in progress), Committee Member, Communication and Culture, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Organizing Uber Drivers
Nikolina Postic M.A. (in progress), Committee Member, Department of Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University
Title: Volunteerism in Community and Social Service Agencies in Toronto

Completed

Tim Bartiw Master of Law (complete), Committee Member, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, October 2014
Title: Labour Law and Triangular Employment Growth
Dragana Bukejlovic M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, August 2011
Title: The Feminization of Migration: Paradoxes in Security, Identity, and Temporariness
Omaya Chidiac LL.M (complete), Second Reader, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, December 2014
Title: Migrant Construction and Domestic Workers in the Arab Gulf States: Modern-Day Slaves?
Vincent Collins M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, July 2020
Title: Can the Green New Deal Provide a Way Out of the Global Pandemic That Can Overcome the Climate Crisis and Inequality?
Kevin Corpuz M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, August 2020
Title: Architectures of Resiliency: Re-Thinking and Re-purposing 'Enclave' Settlement and Integration of Filipinx-Canadians in Toronto
Kevin Donaldson M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, August 2020
Title: A Feminist Political Economy of Debt
Naoko Ikeda M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Women’s Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2005
Title: Militarizing Femininities: Current Media Discourses of ‘New Women’ in the Japan Self Defense Forces
Jessica Kelly M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate, Studies, York University, March 2009
Title: Permanent Precarity: Temporary Foreign Workers, Diaspora, and the State
Daniela Kramer M.A. (complete), External Examiner, Anthropology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, June 2003
Title: ‘In the House but Not at Home’: Haosgels in Vanuatu
Deedra-Ann Lake M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, December 2018
Title: The gendered impact of austerity in dependent capitalist countries: the case of Jamaica
Samantha Majic M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2003
Title: An Opportunity to Publicize the Private: Public Education
Campaigns and Domestic Violence in Ontario
Adrie Naylor M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, August 2011
Title: Gendered Labour in the Global City: Work and Resistance in a Toronto Neighbourhood
Jesse Newell M.A. (complete), External Examiner, Education, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, March 2009
Title: Selling Students Short: A Neo-Marxist Feminist Analysis of Formal Career Education Policy in Ontario
Donna Schatz M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2004
Title: Protecting the Rights of Women Sex Workers in Japan: An Alternative International Human Rights Approach
reese simpkins M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2003
Title: Trans Masculinities
Nancy Skinner M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, April 2002
Title: Creating ‘Third World Conditions’ Within the First World: A Study of Ontario’s Single Mothers on Social Assistance
Kristin Skinner M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, March 2003
Title: Women’s Organizing and Transgender Issues
Breanne Whitwell M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, September 2007
Title: ‘Why We Need a New Welfare State’—Rediscovering the “Good Life” in Absentia: Rethinking Work, the Welfare State and Community in Canada

Other
Completed

Meghan Edwards M.A. (complete), Second Reader, Sociology, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Ryerson University, September 2017
Title: Charting Precarious Employment in Ontario: Considering Gender and Household Organization
Jackson Enoh MSc. (complete), External Examiner, Dhillon School of Business, University of Lethbridge, 2020
Title: The Experiences of Male and Female Contract Academic Staff (CAS) Regarding their use of Work-Life Balance Programs

Courses Taught

York University

  • The Contemporary Politics of Work and Labour POLS 4406 (3 credits), Fall 2013-Spring 2019
  • Canadian Social Policy in Comparative Perspective POLS 4165, Winter 2009
  • The Political Economy of Work and Welfare GS POLS 6775 (Cross-listed with GS WMST 6207 3.0 and GS SOCI 6683 3.0), Winter 2002-Present
  • Advanced Studies in Women and Politics GS POLS 6770, Fall 2002- Fall 2015, Winter 2020
  • Special Seminar in Feminist Political Economy GS POLS 6990 (6 credits), Winter 2003/Summer 2003

Books (Authored)

Vosko, Leah F., et al. (2020). Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Improving Protections for People in Precarious Jobs. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (Received grant from Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences Aid to Scholarly Publications Programme) (480 pgs) utorontopress.com/ca/closing-the-enforcement-gap-4

Vosko, Leah F. (2019). Disrupting Deportability: Transnational Workers Organize. Ithaca: Cornell University Press (ILR Imprint). (192 pgs) www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501742149/disrupting-deportability/#bookTabs=1

Vosko, Leah F. (2010). Managing the Margins: Gender, Citizenship and the International Regulation of Precarious Employment. (Politics and Business Series) Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (311 pgs) oxford.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199574810.001.0001/acprof-9780199574810

Cranford, Cynthia, Judy Fudge, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (2005). Self-Employed Workers Organize: Law, Policy, and Unions. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. (208 pgs) www.mqup.ca/self-employed-workers-organize-products-9780773528727.php

Vosko, Leah F. (2000). Temporary Work: The Gendered Rise of a Precarious Employment Relationship. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (Received grant from Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences Aid to Scholarly Publications Programme) (380 pgs) utorontopress.com/ca/temporary-work-3

Monographs (Authored)

Vosko, Leah F., Andrea M. Noack and Eric Tucker. (2016). “Employment Standards (‘ES’) Coverage and Enforcement: A scan of employment standards complaints and their resolution under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (‘ESA’).” Ontario Ministry of Labour Changing Workplaces Review. (128 pgs)

Vosko, Leah F., Andrea M. Noack and Mark P. Thomas. (2016). “Employment Standards (‘ES’) Coverage: How far does the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (‘ESA’) extend and what are the gaps in coverage?” Ontario Ministry of Labour Changing Workplaces Review. (122 pgs)

Vosko, Leah F., Eric Tucker, Mark P. Thomas and Mary Gellatly. (2012). “New Approaches to Enforcement and Compliance with Labour Regulatory Standards: The Case of Ontario, Canada.” Toronto: Law Commission of Ontario. (160 pgs)

Noack, Andrea M. and Leah F. Vosko. (2012). “Precarious Jobs in Ontario: Mapping Dimensions of Labour Market in Security by Workers’ Social Location and Context.” Toronto: Law Commission of Ontario. (60 pgs)

Vosko, Leah F. (2011). “The Challenge of Expanding EI Coverage: Charting Exclusions and Partial Exclusions on the Bases of Gender, Immigration Status, Age, and Place of Residence and Exploring Avenues for Inclusive Policy Redesign.” Toronto: Mowat Centre for Public Policy. (50 pgs)

Vosko, Leah F. (2004). “Confronting the Norm: Gender and the International Regulation of Precarious Work.” Ottawa: Law Commission of Canada. (136 pgs) dsp-psd.pwgsc.gc.ca/Collection/JL2-27-2004E.pdf

Fudge, Judy, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (2002). “The Legal Concept of Employment: Marginalizing Workers. Ottawa: The Law Commission of Canada.” (125 pgs) www.atkinson.yorku.ca/ace/publications/Law_Commission_of_Canada.pdf

Vosko, Leah F. (2002). “Rethinking Feminization: Gendered Precariousness in the Canadian Labour Market and the Crisis in Social Reproduction.” a monograph prepared for the Annual Robarts Lecture, John P. Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies. (90 pgs) www.genderwork.ca/modules/precarious/papers/vosko.2002.rethinking.pdf

Books and Special Issues (Edited)

Thomas, Mark P., Leah F. Vosko, Carlo Fanelli and Olena Lyubchenko (eds). (2019). Change and Continuity: Rethinking the New Canadian Political Economy. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Vosko, Leah F., Valerie Preston and Robert Latham (eds.). (2014). Liberating Temporariness?: Migration, Work and Citizenship in an Age of Insecurity. McGill-Queen’s University Press: Montreal and Kingston. www.mqup.ca/liberating-temporariness--products-9780773543829.php

Braedley, Susan, Jacinthe Michaud and Leah F. Vosko (eds.) (2012). Feminism, Policy and Collective Action: un dialogue entre le Québec et l'Ontario. Canadian Women’s Studies. November.

Vosko, Leah F., Martha MacDonald and Iain Campbell (eds.). (2009). Gender and the Contours of Precarious Employment. London and New York: Routledge Press (Advances in Feminist Economics Series). www.routledge.com/Gender-and-the-Contours-of-Precarious-Employment/Vosko-MacDonald-Campbell/p/book/9780415494540

Vosko, Leah F. (ed.). (2006). Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. (Received grant from Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences Aid to Scholarly Publications Programme) www.mqup.ca/precarious-employment-products-9780773529618.php

Vosko, Leah F. (2004). Special Issue: Benefiting Women? Women’s Labour Rights. Canadian Women’s Studies. 23, 3, 4. (Guest Editorial Board)

Stanford, Jim and Leah F. Vosko (eds). (2004). Challenging the Market: The Struggle to Regulate Work and Income. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press. www.mqup.ca/challenging-the-market-products-9780773527263.php

Vosko, Leah F. (ed.). (2003). Just Labour: Forum on Precarious Employment. (Special Issue: Includes Editors’ Introduction): September.

Clement, Wallace and Leah F. Vosko (eds.). (2003). Changing Canada: The Political Economy of Transformation. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press. www.mqup.ca/changing-canada-products-9780773525313.php

Andrew, Caroline, Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Wallace Clement and Leah F. Vosko (eds.). (2003). Studies in Political Economy: Developments in Feminism. Toronto: Women’s Press.

Select Refereed Journal Articles

Vosko, Leah F. (forthcoming). "Temporary Labour Migration by Any Other Name: Differential Inclusion under Canada’s “New” International Mobility Regime." Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2020.1834839

Marsden, Sarah, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (forthcoming). ““Flawed by Design?: A Case Study of Federal Enforcement of Migrant Workers’ Labour Rights in Canada.” Canadian Employment and Labour Law Journal.

Easton, Mark, Andrea M. Noack and Leah F. Vosko (2020). "Are Franchises More Likely to Violate Employment Standards than Other Types of Businesses? Evidence from Ontario, Canada." Economic and Labour Relations Review. DOI: doi/10.1177/1035304620961862

Boris, Eileen and Leah F. Vosko. (2020). "Point-Counterpoint: The Making of the Woman Worker". Labor: Studies in Working Class History. 174, 4 (December):106-112.

Andrea M. Noack, Alice Hoe and Leah F. Vosko. (2020). “Who to inspect? Using employee complaint data to inform workplace inspections in Ontario.” Canadian Public Policy. 46, 3 (September): 429-433.

Chartrand, Tyler and Leah F. Vosko. (2020). “Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker and International Mobility Programs: Charting Change and Continuity Among Source Countries.” International Migration. 59(1): 1-22.

Thomas, Mark P., Leah F. Vosko, Eric Tucker, Mercedes Steedman, Andrea M. Noack, John Grundy, Mary Gellatly and Lisa Leinveer. (2019). “The Employment Standards Enforcement Gap and the Overtime Pay Exemption in Ontario.” Labour/Le Travail. 84(Fall) 25-51.

Vosko, Leah F., Eric Tucker and Rebecca M. Casey. (2019). “Enforcing Employment Standards for Migrant Agricultural Workers in Ontario: Exposing Underexplored Layers of Vulnerability.” International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations 35(2) 227-254.

Tucker, Eric, Leah F. Vosko, Rebecca Casey, Mark P. Thomas, John Grundy and Andrea M. Noack. (2019). “Carrying Little Sticks: Is there a ‘Deterrence Gap’ in Employment Standards Enforcement in Ontario, Canada?” International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations. 35(1) 1-30.

Vosko, Leah F., John Grundy, Rebecca Casey, Andrea M. Noack and Mark P. Thomas. (2018). “A Tattered Quilt: Exemptions and Special Rules under Ontario’s Employment Standards Act (2000).” Canadian Employment and Labour Law Journal. 21(2) 267-298.

Casey, Rebecca, Eric Tucker, Leah F. Vosko and Andrea M. Noack. (2018). “Using tickets in employment standards inspections: Deterrence as effective enforcement in Ontario, Canada?” Economic and Industrial Relations Review. 29(2) 228-249.

Vosko, Leah F. (2018). “Legal but Deportable: Institutionalized Deportability and the Limits of Collective Bargaining among Participants in Canada’s Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program.” ILR Review Special Issue on The Impact of Immigrant Legalization Initiatives: International Perspectives. 71(4), 882-907. DOI:10.1177/0019793918756055.

Vosko, Leah F., John Grundy, Mark P. Thomas, Eric Tucker, Andrea M. Noack, Rebecca Casey, Mary Gellatly and Jennifer Mussell. (2017). “The Compliance Model of Employment Standards Enforcement: An Evidence-based Assessment of its Efficacy in Instances of Wage Theft.” Industrial Relations Journal. 48(3) 256-273.

Grundy, John, Andrea M. Noack, Leah F. Vosko and Rebecca Hii. (2017). “The Enforcement of Ontario’s Employment Standards Act: The Impact of Reforms.” Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de politiques (shared second authorship with Noack, 30%). 43(3) 190-201.

Mirchandani, Kiran, Leah F. Vosko, Urvashi Soni-Sinha, Adam Perry, Andrea M. Noack, Rebecca Hall and Mary Gellatly. (2016). “Methodological k/nots: Designing research on the enforcement of labor standards.” Journal of Mixed Methods Research. June 8, 2016: 1-15. DOI: 10.1177/1558689816651793

Vosko, Leah F., John Grundy and Mark P. Thomas. (2016). “Challenging New Governance: Evaluating New Approaches to Employment Standards Enforcement in Common Law Jurisdictions.” Economic and Industrial Democracy. 37: 373-398. DOI:10.1177/0143831X14546237

Tucker, Eric, Alan Hall, Leah F. Vosko, Rebecca Hall and Elliot Siemiatycki. (2016). “Making or Administering Law and Policy? Discretion and Judgement in Employment Standards Enforcement in Ontario.” Canadian Journal of Law & Society / La Revue Canadienne Droit et Société. 31 (April), 1: 65-86. DOI: 10.1017/cls.2015.34.

Vosko, Leah F. (2016). “Blacklisting as a Modality of Deportability: Mexico’s Response to Circular Migrant Agricultural Workers’ Pursuit of Collective Bargaining Rights in British Columbia, Canada.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 42(8) 1371-1387. DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2015.1111134

Noack, Andrea, Leah F. Vosko and John Grundy. (2015). “Measuring Employment Standards Violations, Evasion and Erosion using a Telephone Survey.” Industrial Relations/Relations Industrielles. (equal first authorship with Noack), 70(1) 86-109.

Vosko, Leah F. (2014). “Tenuously Unionized: Temporary Migrant Workers and the Limits of Formal Mechanisms Designed to Promote Collective Bargaining in British Columbia, Canada.” Industrial Law Journal. 43(4) 451-84.

Vosko, Leah F. and Mark P. Thomas. (2014). “Confronting the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: Exploring the Potential of Union Engagement in Employment Law in Ontario, Canada.” Journal of Industrial Relations. 56: 631-652.

Vosko, Leah F. (2013). “National Sovereignty and Transnational Labour: the case of Mexican seasonal agricultural workers in British Columbia, Canada.” Industrial Relations Journal. 56(44) 514–532.

Vosko, Leah F. (2013). “‘Rights without Remedies’: Enforcing Employment Standards in Ontario by Maximizing Voice among Workers in Precarious Jobs.” Osgoode Hall Law Journal. 50(4) 845-873.

Rajkumar, Deepa, Laurel Berkowitz, Leah F. Vosko, Valerie Preston and Robert Latham (2012). “At the Temporary-Permanent Divide: How Canada Produces Temporariness and Makes Citizens through its Security, Work, and Settlement Policies.” Citizenship Studies. 16(3-4) 483-510.

Gellatly, Mary, John Grundy, Kiran Mirchandani, Adam Perry, Mark P. Thomas and Leah F. Vosko (2011). “‘Modernizing’ Employment Standards? Administrative Efficiency, Market Regulation, and the Production of the Illegitimate Claimant in Ontario, Canada.” Economic and Labour Relations Review. 22 (2) 81-106.

Vosko, Leah F. (2010). “A New Approach to Regulating Temporary Agency Work in Ontario or Back to the Future?” Industrial Relations/Relations Industrielles. 65, 4 (December): 632-653. (This article has been reprinted and translated into Swedish. It appears as: Vosko, Leah F. (2013). “Ett nytt synsätt på reglering av arbete vid bemanningsföretag i Ontario, ellerTillbaka till framtiden?” Arbetarhistori. 3-4: 16-26.

Vosko, Leah F. (2009). “Less than Adequate: Regulating Temporary Agency Work in the EU in the Face of an Internal Market in Services.” Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy, and Society. (special issue on “Transforming Work”). Electronic copy: April, 1-17; Hard copy 2, 3, November.

Vosko, Leah F. (2008). “Temporary Work in Transnational Labour Regulation: SER Centrism and the Risk of Exacerbating Gendered Precariousness.” Social Indicators Research. 88(1) August: 131-145.

Fuller, Sylvia and Leah F. Vosko. (2008). “Temporary Employment and Social Inequality in Canada: Exploring Intersections of Gender, Race and Migration.” Social Indicators Research. 88(1) August: 31-50.

Vosko, Leah. F. (2007). “Precarious Part-Time Work in Australia and in Transnational Labour Regulation: The Gendered Limits of SER-Centrism.” Labour and Industry. 17(3) April: 99-125.

Fudge, Judy, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (2003). “Changing Boundaries in Employment: Developing a New Platform for Labour Law.” Canada Labour and Employment Law Journal. 10(3) 361-399.

Vosko, Leah F., Nancy Zukewich and Cynthia Cranford. (2003). “Precarious Jobs: A New Typology of Employment.” Perspectives on Labour and Income. Ottawa: Statistics Canada: October: 16-26.

Cranford, Cynthia, Leah F. Vosko and Nancy Zukewich. (2003). “The Gender of Precarious Employment in Canada.” Relations Industrielles/Industrial Relations. 58(3) 454-482.

Vosko, Leah F. (2003). “Precarious Employment in Canada: Taking Stock, Taking Action.” (editor’s introduction). Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society. 3, Fall: 1-5.

Cranford, Cynthia, Leah F. Vosko and Nancy Zukewich. (2003). “Precarious Employment in the Canadian Labour Market: A Statistical Portrait.” Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society. 3, Fall: 6-22.

Fudge, Judy, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (2003). “Employee or Independent Contractor? Charting the Legal Significance of the Distinction in Canada.” Canadian Journal of Labour and Employment Law. 10(2) 193-230.

Griffin-Cohen, Marjorie, Laurell Ritchie, Michelle Swenarchuk and Leah F. Vosko. (2002). “Globalization: Some Implications and Strategies for Women.” Canadian Women’s Studies. 21/22(4/1) 6-14.

Vosko, Leah F. (2002) “The Pasts (and Futures) of Feminism and Political Economy in Canada: Reviving the Debate.” Studies in Political Economy. Summer: 55-85.

Vosko, Leah F. (2002). “‘Decent Work’: The Shifting Role of the ILO and the Struggle for Global Social Justice.” Global Social Policy. 2(1) April: 19-45. (This article was published as the centre piece of a special issue on trade and labour standards. It was accompanied by three commentaries prepared by scholars from the U.S., Canada, and the UK.)

Fudge, Judy and Leah F. Vosko. (2001). “By Whose Standards? Re-Regulating the Canadian Labour Market.” Economic and Industrial Democracy. 22(3) 327-356.

Fudge, Judy and Leah F. Vosko. (2001). “Gender, Segmentation and the Standard Employment Relationship in Canadian Labour Law and Policy.” Economic and Industrial Democracy. 22(2) 271-310.

Vosko, Leah F. and David Witwer. (2001). “‘Not a man’s union’: Women in the Teamsters Union During the 1940s and 1950s.” Journal of Women’s History. 13(3) Autumn: 169–92.

Vosko, Leah F. (1998). “Workfare Temporaries: Workfare and the Rise of the Temporary Employment Relationship in Ontario.” Canadian Review of Social Policy. November: 55-79.

Vosko, Leah F. (1998). “Regulating Precariousness?: The Temporary Employment Relationship Under the NAFTA and the EC Treaty.” Relations Industrielles/Industrial Relations. 53(1) March: 123-153.

Luxton, Meg and Leah F. Vosko. (1998). “Where Women’s Efforts Count: The 1996 Census Campaign and ‘Family Politics’ in Canada.” Studies in Political Economy. 56, Summer: 49–82.

Vosko, Leah F. (1997). “Legitimizing the Triangular Employment Relationship: Emerging International Labour Standards from a Comparative Perspective.” Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal. Fall: 43–77.

Vosko, Leah F. (1993). “Fabric Friends and Clothing Foes: A Comparative Analysis of Textile and Apparel Industries under the NAFTA.” Review of Radical Political Economics. New York: Basil Blackwell Publishers, 25(4) 45-58.

Vosko, Leah F. (1993). The Last Thread: Analysis of the Apparel Goods Provisions in the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Impact on Women. Ottawa: The Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives.

Chapters in Books

Thomas, Mark P. and Leah F. Vosko (2019). “Canadian Political Economy in the New Millennium,” in Thomas, Mark P., Leah F. Vosko, Carlo Fanelli and Olena Lyubchenko (eds.), Change and Continuity: Rethinking the New Canadian Political Economy. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 1–22.

Vosko, Leah F. (2019) “Feminist Political Economy and Everyday Research on Work and Employment: The Case of the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap,” in Thomas, Mark P., Leah F. Vosko, Carlo Fanelli and Olena Lyubchenko (eds.), Change and Continuity: Rethinking the New Canadian Political Economy. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 41-59.

Vosko, Leah F., Grundy, John and Mark P. Thomas. (2017). “Beyond New Governance: Evaluating New Approaches to Employment Standards Enforcement in Liberal Market Economies,” in Fenwick, Colin (ed.), Regulating for Equitable and Job-Rich Growth. Palgrave/International Labour Organization. International Institute for Labour Studies: ILO, Geneva.

Latham, Robert, Leah F. Vosko, Valerie Preston and Melisa Breton. (2014). “Challenges to Liberating Temporariness: Imagining Alternatives to Permanence as a Pathway for Social Inclusion,” in Vosko, Leah F., Valerie Preston and Robert Latham (eds.), Liberating Temporariness?: Migration, Work and Citizenship in an Age of Insecurity. McGill-Queen’s University Press: Montreal and Kingston. (shared first authorship between Latham, Vosko and Preston).

Vosko, Leah F. (2012). “The Challenge of Expanding EI Coverage,” in Banting, Keith and Jon Medow (eds.), Making EI Work: Research from the Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force. Toronto and Montreal: Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation, McGill-Queen’s University Press and Queen’s School of Policy Studies: 57-119.

Vosko, Leah F. (2011). “Out of the Shadows? The Non-Binding Multilateral Framework on Migration (2006) and Prospects for Forging Global Labour Market Membership through International Labour Regulation,” in Davidov, Guy and Brian Langille (eds.), The Idea of Labour Law. London, Hart Publishing: 365-384.

Vosko, Leah F. (2011). “Precarious Employment and the Problem of SER-Centrism: Regulating for ‘Decent Work’,” in Lee, Sangheon and Deirdre McCann (eds.), Regulating for Decent Work: New Directions in Labour Market Regulation. Geneva and London: ILO/Palgrave: 57-89.

Vosko, Leah F., Martha MacDonald and Iain Campbell. (2009). “Introduction: Gender and the Concept of Precarious Employment,” in Vosko, Leah F., Martha MacDonald and Iain Campbell (eds.), Gender and the Contours of Precarious Employment. London and New York: Routledge Press: 1-25.

Vosko, Leah F. and Lisa F. Clark. (2009). “Gendered Precariousness and Social Reproduction in Canada,” in Vosko, Leah F., Martha MacDonald and Iain Campbell (eds.), Gender and the Contours of Precarious Employment. London and New York: Routledge Press: 26-42.

Vosko, Leah F. (2009). “Precarious Employment and the Challenges for Employment Policy,” in Cohen, Marjorie and Jane Pulkingham (eds.), Public Policy for Women in Canada: The State, Income Security, and Labour Market Issues. Toronto: University of Toronto Press: 374–395.

Vosko, Leah F. (2008). “‘Lifelong Learning’ and Precarious Work: Challenging the Paradigm of Employability Security,” in Livingstone, David, Kiran Mirchandani and Peter Sawchuk (eds.), The Future of Lifelong Learning and Work: Critical Perspectives. Sense Publishers, Rotterdam: 157-170.

Vosko, Leah F. (2008) “ILO Action on ‘The Scope of the Employment Relationship’: Lessons from Canada on Fostering Social Cohesion,” in O’Brien, Robert (ed.), Solidarity First: Canadian Workers and Social Cohesion. Vancouver: UBC Press: 169–189.

Vosko, Leah F. (2007). “Representing Informal Economy Workers: Emerging Global Strategies and their Lessons for North American Unions,” in Cobble, Dorothy Sue (ed.), The Sex of Class: Women and America’s New Labour Movements. Ithaca: Cornell University Press: 272–290.

Vosko, Leah F. (2007). “Gendered Labour Market Insecurities: Manifestations of Precarious Employment in Different Locations,” in Shalla, Vivian and Wallace Clement (eds.), Work and Labour in Tumultuous Times: Critical Perspectives. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 50-95.

Vosko, Leah F. (2006). “Crisis Tendencies in Social Reproduction: The Case of Ontario’s Early Year’s Plan,” in Bezanson, Kate and Meg Luxton (eds.), Rethinking Social Reproduction: Feminist Political Economy Challenges Neo-liberalism. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 145-172.

Vosko, Leah F. (2006). “Gender, Precarious Work and the International Labour Code: The Ghost in the Closet,” in Fudge, Judy and Rosemary Owens (eds.), Precarious Work, Women and the New Economy: The Challenge to Legal Norms. Oxford, UK: Hart Publishing: 53-75.

Vosko, Leah F. (2006). “Precarious Employment: Towards an Improved Understanding of Labour Market Insecurity,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 3-39.

Vosko, Leah F. (2006). “What Is to Be Done? Harnessing Knowledge to Mitigate Precarious Employment,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 379-388.

Cranford, Cynthia J. and Leah F. Vosko. (2006). “Conceptualizing Precarious Employment: Mapping Wage Work across Social Location and Occupational Context,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 43-66.

Vosko, Leah F. and Nancy Zukewich. (2006). “Precarious by Choice? Gender and Self-Employment,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 67-89.

Bernstein, Stephanie, Katherine Lippel, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko. (2006). “Precarious Employment and the Law’s Flaws: Identifying Regulatory Failure and Securing Effective Protection for Workers,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 203-220.

Cranford, Cynthia J., Tania Das Gupta, Deena Ladd and Leah F. Vosko. (2006). “Thinking through Community Unionism,” in Vosko, Leah F. (ed.), Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 353-377.

Cranford, Cynthia J., Mary Gellatly, Deena Ladd and Leah F. Vosko. (2006). “Community Unionism and Labour Movement Renewal: Organizing for Fair Employment,” in Kumar, Pradeep and Christopher Schenk (eds.), Paths to Union Renewal: Canadian Experiences. Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press, Garamond Press, and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: 237–249.

Vosko, Leah F. (2004). “Standard-Setting at the ILO: The Case of Precarious Employment,” in Kirton, John and Michael J. Trebilcock (eds.), Hard Choices, Soft Law: Combining Trade, Environment, and Social Cohesion in Global Governance. New York: Ashgate: 139-157.

Stanford, Jim and Leah F. Vosko. (2004). “Challenging the Market: The Struggle to Regulate Work and Income,” in Stanford, Jim and Leah F. Vosko (eds.), Challenging the Market: The Struggle to Regulate Work and Income. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 3-33.

Vosko, Leah F. (2003). “‘Decent Work’: The Shifting Role of the ILO and the Struggle for Global Social Justice,” in Cohen, Marjorie and Stephen McBride (eds.), Global Turbulence: Social Activists and State Responses to Globalization. UK: Ashgate 174-191. *(chapter designed for classroom use based on article in Global Social Policy 2002 April).

Vosko, Leah F. (2003). “The Pasts (and Futures) of Feminist Political Economy in Canada: Reviving the Debate,” in Andrew, Caroline, Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Wallace Clement, and Leah F. Vosko (eds.), Studies in Political Economy: Developments in Feminism. Toronto: Women’s Press: 305-332. *(abbreviated version of SPE 2002 April).

Armstrong, Pat, Caroline Andrew, and Leah F. Vosko (2003). “General Introduction,” in Andrew, Caroline, Pat Armstrong, Hugh Armstrong, Wallace Clement and Leah F. Vosko (eds.), Studies in Political Economy: Developments in Feminism. Toronto: Women’s Press: 1-10.

Vosko, Leah F. (2003). “Gender Differentiation and the Standard/ Non-Standard Employment Distinction: A Genealogy of Policy Intervention in Canada,” in Juteau, Danielle (ed.), Patterns and Processes of Social Differentiation: The Construction of Gender, Age, ‘Race/Ethnicity’ and Locality. University of Toronto Press/ University of Montreal Press (French and English): 25-80.

Clement, Wallace and Leah F. Vosko. (2003). “Changing Canada: Political Economy As Transformation,” in Clement, Wallace and Leah F. Vosko (eds.), Changing Canada: Political Economy as Transformation. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: xi-xxxii.

Fudge, Judy and Leah F. Vosko. (2003). “Gendered Paradoxes and the Rise of Contingent Work: Towards a Transformative Feminist Political Economy of the Labour Market,” in Clement, Wallace and Leah F. Vosko (eds.), Changing Canada: Political Economy as Transformation. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press: 183-213.

Vosko, Leah F. (2002). “Mandatory ‘Marriage’ or Obligatory Waged Work: Social Assistance and Single Mothers in Wisconsin and Ontario,” in Bashevkin, Sylvia (ed.), Women’s Work is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Care-Giving, Employment, and Social Policy Reform. New York, Routledge: 165-199.

Cobble, Dorothy Sue and Leah F. Vosko. (2000). “Historical Perspectives on Representing Workers in ‘Non-Standard’ Employment,” in F. Carre, M.A. Ferber, I. Golden and S.A. Herzenberg (eds.), Nonstandard Work: The Nature and Challenges of Changing Employment Relations. Champagne, IL: Industrial Relations Research Association: 291-312.

Vosko, Leah F. (1999). “Workfare Temporaries: Workfare and the Rise of the Temporary Employment Relationship in Ontario,” in Broad, David (ed.), Citizens or Consumers: Social Policy in a Market Society. Halifax and Vancouver: Fernwood Press: 55-79 (Reprinted from Canadian Review of Social Policy. November 1998).

Vosko, Leah F. (1996). “Irregular Workers, New Involuntary Social Exiles: Women and UI
Reform,” in Pulkingham, J. and G. Ternowetsky (eds.), Remaking Canadian Social Policy: Social Security in the Late 1990s. Toronto: Fernwood Press: 265-272.

Vosko, Leah F. (1995). “Recreating Dependency: Women and UI Reform,” in Drache, D. and A.
Ranikin (eds.), Warm Heart, Cold Country. Toronto: Caledon Press: 213-231.

Other Publications

Technical Reports

Basok, Tanya…. Vosko, Leah F. et al (2020). "2020 Canada-Mexico SAWP Negotiations: Recommendations from the Migrant Worker Health Expert Working Group (MHEWG)," Prepared at the Annual Bilateral Negotations, Ottawa, Canada, November 17, 2020.

Basok, Tanya…. Vosko, Leah F. et al (2020). "2020 Canada-Caribbean SAWP Negotiations: Recommendations from the Migrant Worker Health Expert Working Group (MHEWG)," Prepared at the Annual Bilateral Negotiations, Ottawa, Canada, November 30, 2020.

Basok, Tanya…. Vosko, Leah F. et al (2020). COVID-19 Recommendations Regarding Migrant Agricultural Workers in Canada to the Federal Government; COVID-19 Recommendations Regarding Migrant Agricultural Workers in Canada to the Province of Ontario; Follow-up Letter to the Federal Government. Prepared by the Migrant Worker Heath Expert Working Group (MHEWG), June-July 2020. Available at: www.migrantworker.ca

King, Adam K., Veldon Coburn, Leah F. Vosko, Olena Lyubchenko, Rebecca J. Hall, Andrea M. Noack, and Tyler Chartrand (2020). “What’s at the ‘Core of Indianness’?: Bill C-92, Labour & Indigenous Social Services,” a brief prepared for the Yellowhead Institute, November 10, 2020. yellowheadinstitute.org/2020/11/10/whats-at-the-core-of-indianness-bill-c92-labour-and-indigenous-social-services/

Marsden, Sarah, Eric Tucker and Leah F. Vosko (2020). “Federal Enforcement of Migrant Workers’ Labour Rights in Canada: A Research Report.” Osgoode Legal Studies Research Paper. papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3601870

Vosko, Leah F. (2020). Submission to the Ontario Jobs and Recovery Committee, Government of Ontario. May 5.

Closing the Enforcement Gap Research Group. (PI Leah F. Vosko). (2018). Modernizing Part III of the Canada Labour Code. Submission to the Network of Experts on Federal Labour Standards, Employment and Social Development Canada, December.

Vosko, Leah F., John Grundy, Eric Tucker, Andrea M. Noack, Alan Hall, Mark P. Thomas, Rebecca Casey and Kiran Mirchandani. (2017). Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap: An Agenda for Change. June. (58 pgs)

Tucker, Eric, Leah F. Vosko, John Grundy and Alec Stromdahl. (2016). “Outsourcing and Supply Chains in Canada,” in Comparative Labor Law Dossier. IUS Labor 3/2016: 150-157.

Vosko, Leah F., John Grundy, Eric Tucker, Andrea M. Noack, Alan Hall, Mark P. Thomas, Rebecca Casey and Guliz Akkaymak. (2016). A Research Brief Addressing Options Identified in the Interim Report of the Changing Workplaces Review October 14, 2016. (95 pgs)

Tucker, Eric and Leah F. Vosko. (2016). “Working Time and Flexibility in Canada,” in Comparative Labor Law Dossier. IUSLabor 1: 154-164.

Vosko, Leah F. (2005-2016). Annual Advice Reports to Labour Commissioner, Employment Insurance Commission of Canada on the choice and design of studies to be undertaken as part of the Monitoring and Assessment Report (MAR) on the Implementation of Employment Insurance Policies and Programs.

Vosko, Leah F. and Sylvia Fuller. (2005). Contribution on Canada in “Chapter Employment, Gender and Poverty,” in United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). Progress of the World's Women 2005: Women, Work and Poverty. New York: UNIFEM.

Vosko, Leah F. (2002). “Decent work in the informal economy: A Discussion Paper on Item VI of the 90th Session of the International Labour Conference, 2002,” a report prepared for Women in the Informal Economy Globalizing and Organizing.

Vosko, Leah F. (2001). “Challenging Limitations on Freedom of Association and the Right to Organize and Bargain Collectively: The Case of Temporary Workers,” a report prepared for a workshop on The Right to Organize and Bargain Collectively organized under the North American Accord on Labour Cooperation, Toronto.

Vosko, Leah F. (1997). “The Role of Inter-Governmental, Inter-Ministerial and Tripartite Consultation on ILO Matters: A Comparative Discussion,” a discussion paper prepared for Human Resources and Development Canada.

Vosko, Leah F. (1997). “The Rise of the Temporary Help Industry in Canada and Its Relationship to the Decline of the Standard Employment Relationship as the Normative Model of Employment,” background paper prepared for Collective Reflections on a Changing Workplace, The Labour Programme, Human Resources and Development Canada.

Book Reviews/Review Essays

Stone, Katherine V.W. and Harry Arthurs (eds.). (2013). Rethinking Workplace Regulation: Beyond the Standard Contract of Employment, (New York, NY, Russell Sage Foundation. Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal. 35, 1, October: 101-106.

Johnson, Laura C. (2004). The Co-Workplace: Teleworking in the Neighbourhood. Toronto and Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. Labour. Le Travail. 53, Spring: 261-263.

Briskin, Linda and Mona Eliasson. (2001). Women’s Organizing and Public Policy in Canada and Sweden. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Canadian Review of American Studies. Summer: 556-559.

Rogers, Jackie Krakas. (2000). Temps: The Many Faces of the Changing Workplace. New York: Cornell University Press. Relations Industrielles/ Industrial Relations. 25, 4: 779-780.

Other Publications

Weiler, Anelyse, Stephanie Mayell, Leah F. Vosko and Jenna Hennebry (2020). “Let’s Accept Migrant Farmworkers as Members of Our Community,” Toronto Star, September 7, 2020. Available: www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2020/09/07/lets-accept-migrant-farmworkers-as-members-of-our-food-community.html

v

2019 Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Impact Award
(Insight)
2010–Present Canada Research Chair (Tier 1), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
2013–Present Research Fellow, Broadbent Institute
2020 CAWLS (Canadian Association for Work & Labour Studies) Book Prize (for Disrupting Deportability)
2020 York University Research Leader 2020, awarded jointly by the Offices of the President and the Vice-President Research and Innovation
2019 Impact Award (Insight Category), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
2017 York University Research Leader 2017, awarded jointly by the Offices of the President and the Vice-President Research and Innovation
2016 Charles Taylor Prize for Excellence in Policy Research, awarded by the Broadbent Institute
2016 York University Research Leader 2016, awarded jointly by the Offices of the President and the Vice-President Research and Innovation
2015 Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada
2014 York University Research Leader 2014, awarded jointly by the Offices of the President and the Vice-President Research and Innovation
2011–2012 Research Fellowship, Industrial and Labor Relations School, Cornell University
2006–2007 Research Fellow, Institute of Gender Studies, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, UK
2006–2007 Research Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Oxford, UK
2006 Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Visiting Fellowship, Melbourne, Australia
2005–2010 (Ontario) Premier’s Research Excellence Award
2004 Featured Guest on Ideas, CBC Radio, Aired March 30 (Rebroadcast on September 6 (Labour Day)
2003–2004 Virtual Scholar in Residence, Law Commission of Canada
2002 Robarts Chairholder Lecturer, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University
2001–2010 Canada Research Chair (Tier 2), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
1998–1999 Canada-U.S. Fulbright Fellowship, Institute for Research on Women, and Research Fellow, Centre for Women and Work, Rutgers University
2020–Present Member, Expert Working Group on Migrant Worker Health Projec
2019–Present Member, Expert Working Group on Temporary Labour Migration, International Labour Organization
2017–Present Member, Network of Experts on Federal Labour Standards, Government of Canada
2013–Present Research Fellow, Broadbent Institute
2009–Present Research Associate, Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law at the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
2016–2017 Advisor, Academic Reference Group, Changing Workplace Review, Government of Ontario
2010–2012 Co-Director, Centre for Research on Work and Society/ Global Labour Research Centre, York University
2005–2018 Academic Advisor, Labour Commissioner, Employment Insurance Commission of Canada, (Assists in design of studies towards the annual Monitoring and Assessment Report on the Implementation of Employment Insurance Policies and Programs mandated by the Parliament of Canada.)

I am committed to engaging in independent and collaborative research that has an impact not only within but beyond academia. As a consequence, at the international level, I have consulted with the International Labour Organization on developing statistical indicators for decent work and more recently on temporary migrant work as part of the ILO's Expert Working Group on Temporary Labour Migration (2019-Present). Nationally, my Partnership Grant team participated in the Government of Canada’s Network of Experts in a review of the Canada Labour Code (2018), a consultation that is ongoing with our development of the Canada Labour Code-Data Analysis Infrastructure. In Ontario, I also served as an academic advisor to the Ministry of Labour’s Changing Workplace Review (2015–16), which proposed changes to the province’s Employment Standards Act. This review contributed to the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act (2017), which contained provisions shaped by our research. I have also consulted with other national governments on labour standards enforcement, including the Chinese and British governments. Public engagement with my research intensified with the COVID-19 outbreak, leading me to collaborate with other researchers to address the health, safety and labour rights of temporary migrant farmworkers. To date, I have made policy recommendations to the federal and provincial governments, worked with journalists to publicize the issues (including writing opinion pieces for outlets such as the Toronto Star) and, in 2020, I participated as an intervener in the annual bilateral negotiations between Canada and Mexico and Canada and the Caribbean on the terms of the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program. COVD-19 has put into stark relief the precarious situation of temporary farmworkers and, by speaking out, we hope this crisis will finally lead to the achievement of reforms for which many of us have been advocating for decades.


photo of Amar WahabAmar Wahab

Associate Professor

BSc Agriculture, University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago,
MA Environmental Studies, Shimane University, Japan,
PhD Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

Faculty Profile

Amar Wahab is Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies at York University. He has taught in the areas of critical sexuality studies, critical studies in masculinity, critical race studies, introductory and advanced sociological theory and Caribbean cultural studies. His research interests include: sexual citizenship in liberal and postcolonial nation-state formations (mainly related to the Caribbean and Canada), race and queer transnational politics, critiques of queer liberalism, and race, gender and the politics of representation. His current research focuses on queer anti-racist critiques of homonationalism in Canada and issues of migration and sexual citizenship in the Anglo-Caribbean.

Research areas

My key research areas include: Gender and Sexuality studies, Queer studies, Critical Race studies, Transnational and Postcolonial Cultural studies.

Current Research Activities

My research demonstrates a keen commitment to and meaningful scholarly engagement with issues of gender, sexuality and race through postcolonial, queer, and critical anti-racist perspectives, all of which position my scholarship within a feminist perspective – grounded in the notion that all forms of difference are socially constructed, co-constitutive and sites of power/knowledge. This engagement began in the discipline of sociology during my doctoral research, but has expanded through an interdisciplinary approach that seeks critical and productive dialogue across a range of fields such as: gender and women’s studies, queer/sexuality studies, critical race studies, postcolonial studies, and cultural studies. The primary question underlying my research concerns the production, mobilization and effects of power and difference, more specifically in understanding how gender, sexuality and race meaningfully inform each other, grounded in particular spatial and temporal contexts. The corpus of my scholarly contributions can be broadly organized into two streams: (a) (Post)Colonial Studies and Indian indentureship (in the Caribbean) (b) Queerness, sexuality and race in contemporary Canada and the Global South.

Selected Research Grants

  1. SSHRC IDG 2020-2022: ‘No Country for Refuge: A Critical Case Study of Venezuelan Migrants, Asylum-Seekers and Refugees in Trinidad and Tobago,’
    The principal goal of this two-year research project is to critically investigate the production and contestation of the ‘refugee crisis script’ in the global South based on a case study of state regulation and violence against Venezuelan migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in Trinidad and Tobago. The research will explore the multiple and complex ways in which stakeholders of the specific ‘crisis’ actively engage the process of ‘migration management’ as a discourse of national security. The study will specifically focus on: (1) the government of Trinidad and Tobago’s management policies and practices of regulating Venezuelan migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees; (2) the interventions of non-governmental organizations (local and international) in mediating an imminent humanitarian crisis in Trinidad and Tobago, and: (3) the voices and experiences of Venezuelan migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as their individual and collective responses to social, political, economic, and xenophobic anti-migrant/refugee violence. The project will attempt to place these stakeholders into conversation to open up possibilities for transformative social justice knowledge production through collaboration.
  2. Minor Research Grant 2020: An Exploration of Race, Gender and Sexuality in the LGBTQ+ community in Trinidad and Tobago
    While there is a growing corpus of research on homophobia and LGBTQ+ rights activism in Jamaica, research on the rest of the Anglo-Caribbean remains very limited, despite the branding of the region as exceptionally queer/trans/homo-phobic. In addition, few of the existing scholarly studies explore gender and sexuality from the perspective of LGBTQ+ members’ experiences. This project will explore the politics of identity – specifically regarding the intersections of race, gender and sexuality – within the LGBTQ+ community in Trinidad and Tobago. It will foreground the experiences and voices of out LGBTQ+ folks, focusing on how they construct and negotiate their identities, relations and sense of community within the context of state-sponsored queer/trans/homo-phobia and the denial of non-normative gendered and sexual citizenship. This will simultaneously entail understanding the ways in which the LGBTQ+ community contests queer/trans/homo-phobic nationalism at institutional and cultural levels.

Graduate Supervision

I currently supervise students doing research at the intersections of race and sexuality in the Canadian context, as well as in the global South (specifically the Anglo-Caribbean).

Graduate Students Supervised

Supervisor: Masters Research Paper, The Politics of Respectability: A Racialized and Colonial Discourse, A Site of Black Queer Refusal and Resistance (Candace Trusty) – completed October, 2020.

Second reader: Masters Research Paper: Race reification in popular video games with emphasis on the World of Warcraft (Christopher Zakher) – completed December 2014.

Internal Examiner: The Second Sex of Tomorrow?: Constructions of Masculinity in the Moral Panic About Boys’ Education. A Content Analysis of Canadian News Media (Markus Gerke) – completed June 2015.

Courses Taught

GWST1501 6.0 Introduction to Gender & Women’s Studies
SXST1601 6.0 Introduction to Sexuality Studies
GWST2512 6.0 Race, Gender & Sexuality
SXST4600 6.0 Advanced Seminar in Sexuality Studies
SXST4601 6.0 Queer Methods & Sex Research
GFWS6904 3.0 Critical Approaches to “Race” and Racism
GFWS6905 3.0 Race, Transnationalism & Diaspora

Books

2019 Disciplining Coolies: An Archival Footprint of Trinidad, 1846, Volume I, Series on Transnationalism, Peter Lang Publishing Inc., (294 pages).

2010 Colonial Inventions: Landscape, Power and Representation in Nineteenth-Century ‘Trinidad,’ Cambridge Scholars Publishing, (284 pages).

Chapters in Books

2020 ‘Decolonial interventions to Queer Necropolitics and Homonationalisms.’ (co-authored with Gül Çalışkan, Kayla Preston, Gary Kinsman, and Ghaida Moussa). In Gül Çalışkan and Kayla Preston (eds.) Gendering Globalization, Globalizing Gender: Post-Colonial Perspectives, Oxford University Press, (pp. 40-60).

2018 ‘Queer Affirmations: Negotiating the Possibilities and Limits of Sexual Citizenship in St. Lucia.’ In Nancy Nicol et al (eds.), Envisioning Global LGBT Human Rights, Institute for Commonwealth Studies, University of London, (pp. 131-156).

2015 ‘Unveiling Fetishnationalism: Bidding for Citizenship in Queer Times.’ In Suzanne Lenon and OmiSoore Dryden (eds.), Disturbing Queer Inclusion: Canadian Homonationalisms and the Politics of Belonging. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press, (pp. 35-48).

2007 ‘Island of the Blest’: (Re)naturalizing the Natural Landscape in 19th-Century Trinidad.’ In E. Sommerville and C. Campbell (eds.) What is the Earthly Paradise?: Ecocritical Responses to the Caribbean, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, (pp. 50-72).

2005 ‘Consuming Narratives: Questioning Authority and the Politics of Representation in Social Science Research.’ In: George Dei (ed.) Critical Issues in Anti-Racist Research Methodologies. Peter Lang Publishers, (pp. 29-51).

Refereed Journal Articles

2020 ‘Queer Antiracist Vigilance: Pinkwatching ‘Queer Investments’ in State Racist Violence,’ Journal of Visual Ethnography, Vol. 9, Issue 1: 195-213.

2020 ‘The Darker the Fruit’?: Disciplinary Homonationalism, Racialized Homophobia and Neoliberal Tourism in the St. Lucian-US Contact Zone,’ International Feminist Journal of Politics.
10.1080/14616742.2020.1758589.

2019 ‘(Re)Tracing Queerness: Archiving Indentureship’s ‘Coolie Homo/erotic’,’ Journal of Visual Studies, Vol. 39, Issue 4: 388-394.

2019 ‘Debrisn-1: Visualizing a Bullerman Erotics. Fieldsights: Visual and New Media Review (part of the Journal of Cultural Anthropology). culanth.org/fieldsights/debrisn-1

2019 ‘Affective Mobilizations: Pinkwashing and Racialized Homophobia in Out There.’ Journal of Homosexuality. Online:
10.1080/00918369.2019.1667158.

2018 ‘Indentureship’s Ghostworld: Re-imagining the Coolie Archive,’ Journal of Visual Ethnography, Vol. 7, No. 1: 151-169.

2016 ‘Calling ‘Homophobia’ into Place (Jamaica): Homo/trans/nationalism in the Stop Murder Music Campaign.’ Interventions: Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 18, No. 6: 908-928.

2016 ‘Homosexuality/Homophobia is un/African?: Un/Mapping Transnational Discourses in the context of Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill/Act.’ Journal of Homosexuality, Vol. 63, No. 5: 685-718.

2012 ‘Homophobia as the State of Reason: The Case of Postcolonial Trinidad and Tobago.’ GLQ: Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies, Issue 18.4:481-505.

2011 ‘In the Name of Reason: Colonial Liberalism and the Government of West Indian Indentureship’ Journal of Historical Sociology Volume 24, Issue 2: 209-234.

2009 ‘Queerness in the Transnational Caribbean Canadian Diaspora.’ (co-authored with Dwaine Plaza) Caribbean Review of Gender Studies Special Issue on Critical Sexualities, Vol. 3, pp. 32.

2008 ‘Race, Gender, and Visuality: Regulating Indian Women Subjects in the Colonial Caribbean.’ Caribbean Review of Gender Studies Vol. 2, pp. 23.

2007 ‘Mapping West Indian Orientalism: Race, Gender and Representations of Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth-Century British West Indies.’ Journal of Asian American Studies, Vol. 10, No. 3: 283-311.

2006 ‘Contesting Cultural Citizenship?: The East Indian ‘Big House’ in Trinidad’s Nationalist Discourse.’ Journal of Works and Days: Intellectual Intersections and Racial/Ethnic Crossings, 47/48, Vol. 24, Nos. 1 & 2: 141-165.

2005 ‘Re-Writing Colonized Subjects: Disciplinary Gestures in Charles Kingsley’s At Last: A Christmas in the West Indies (1871).’ Revista Mexicana del Caribe, No. 16: 133-178.

Other Publications

2020 They Came in Ships: Queering Indentureship, Visual Arts of South Asia Festival Exhibition, Canada (15 August–30 November) www.vasaartsfestival.ca.

2019 Coolie Hauntings, Exhibition at Canadian Language Museum, Canada (24 October–5 November). www.languagemuseum.ca


Philip D Walsh

Associate Professor

BA, Philosophy, University of Delaware, USA,
MA, Philosophy and Social Theory, Warwick University,
PhD, Sociology, Warwick University, UK.

Faculty Profile

Biography

I came to Sociology from a background in Philosophy. My work and interests are primarily in sociological theory and the theoretical foundations of the social sciences. I wrote my Ph.D on the epistemological links between the German Idealist philosophical tradition and the critical social theory of the Frankfurt School. My more recent research has argued for the significance of the work of the political theorist, Hannah Arendt, for sociological theory. My current research explores the significance of Critical Realism in the fields of the sociology of knowledge and of emotions.

Research areas

Classical and Contemporary Social Theory; Sociology of Knowledge; Sociology of Emotions, Political Sociology; Philosophy of Social Science.

Current Research Activities

I continue to publish work on the significance of Hannah Arendt and the Frankfurt School for sociology. However, my recent publications have been concerned with critical realism, a distinctive approach to the social sciences that emphasizes the importance of social ontology. I bring this approach to bear on problems within the sociology of knowledge and the sociology of emotions. In these areas, I have been particularly influenced by the work of Norbert Elias.

Selected Research Grants

I don’t do a lot of grant writing. Most of my grants have been small grants from within York.

Graduate Supervision

I am accepting new graduate students. Most of my students have some background in philosophy.

Courses Taught

Key Debates in Sociological Theory,
Political Sociology,
The Sociolpogy of Knowledge,
Critical Theories of Knowledge

Books

Re-Raking the Universe: William S. Burroughs in an Age of Globalization (Pluto, 2005)

Skepticism, Modernity and Critical Theory (Palgrave, 2005)

Arendt Contra Sociology: Theory, Society and its Science (Routledge, 2015)

The Anthem Companion to Hannah Arendt (co-edited with Peter Baehr) (Anthem, 2017)

Refereed Journal Articles

Walsh, Philip (forthcoming, 2021) “Emotions, Personhood and Social Ontology: A Critical Realist Approach”, Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour

Walsh, Philip (2014) “Is a Post-Philosophical Sociology Possible? Insights from Norbert Elias’s Sociology of Knowledge”, Philosophy of the Social Sciences Vol. 44(2), pp. 179-200

Walsh, Philip (2013) “Knowledge and the Constitution of Society: Dead Ends and Ways Forward in the Sociology of Knowledge”, Journal of Classical Sociology Vol. 13 (1), pp. 405-29

Walsh, Philip (2011) “The Human Condition as Social Ontology: Hannah Arendt on Society, Action and Knowledge”, History of the Human Sciences 24 (2), pp. 120-137

Walsh, Philip (2008) “Hannah Arendt, Sociology and Political Modernity”, Journal of Classical Sociology 8 (3)

Walsh, Philip (2007) “Herbert Marcuse and Contemporary Social Theory: Beyond the Consumer Society”, Current Perspectives in Social Theory, Vol. 25, "No Social Science Without Critical Theory" (ed. Harry F. Dahms)

Chapters in Books

Walsh, Philip (2019) “Hannah Arendt and Max Weber on Politics, Technology and Action”, in The Bloomsbury Companion to Hannah Arendt (eds. Peter Gratton and Yasemin Sari). London: Bloomsbury.

Walsh, Philip (2018) “Karl Mannheim and Hannah Arendt on Rationality, Politics and Action”, in The Anthem Companion to Karl Mannheim (eds. David Kettler and Volker Meja). New York: Anthem.

Walsh, Philip (2017) “Hannah Arendt on Thinking, Personhood and Meaning”, in The Anthem Companion to Hannah Arendt. New York: Anthem

Baehr, Peter and Philip Walsh (2017) “Introduction”, in The Anthem Companion to Hannah Arendt. New York: Anthem

Walsh, Philip (2016) “Judgment, Care and Informed Consent: Insights from Hannah Arendt”, in The Art of Care: Knowledge, Communication and the Cultures of Caregiving, edited by Alan Blum and Stuart J. Murray. Farnham: Ashgate

Walsh, Philip, (2015), “Sociology and Classicality: Texts, Borders and Borderline Classics”, in Founders, Classics, Canons: Modern Disputes over the Origins and Appraisal of Sociology’s Heritage, edited by Peter Baehr and Steven Lukes, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers

Walsh, Philip (2014) “Hannah Arendt on the Social”. In Hannah Arendt: Key Concepts, ed. P. Hayden. London: Routledge, pp. 124-37.

Walsh, Philip (2013) “Norbert Elias and Hannah Arendt on Philosophy, Sociology and Science”. In Norbert Elias and Social Theory, edited by Francois Dépelteau and Tatiana Landini. London and New York: Palgrave-MacMillan, pp. 245-60.

Walsh, Philip (2005) "Re-Activating the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Burroughs as Critical Theorist", in Retaking the Universe: William S. Burroughs in an Age of Globalization (pp. 58-73)

Schneiderman, Davis and Philip Walsh (2005) “Millions of People of People Reading the Same Words”, in Retaking the Universe: William S. Burroughs in an Age of Globalization (pp. 1-12)

  • Editorial Board, European Journal of Social Theory

Lorna Weir

Professor

  •  | Founders College, 310 |
  •    ext. 33198 |
  •    lweir@yorku.ca |

Faculty Profile


photo of James WilliamsJames W. Williams

Associate Professor

BAH Sociology, Queen's University (1994),
MA Social and Political Thought, York University (1998),
PhD Sociology, York University (2002)

Faculty Profile

Biography

James W. Williams is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Science and member of the undergraduate Criminology program and Graduate Programs in Sociology and Socio-Legal Studies. Current areas of research include: social impact bonds and the funding of social programs in Canada, the U.S., and the UK; financialization of crime prevention; and blue finance and ocean pollution. His previous research included the role of private firms in policing financial crime, and the regulation of financial markets. He has a book on security enforcement published by Routledge in 2012, Policing the Markets: Inside the Black Box of Securities Enforcement, and has published in journals including the Journal of Urban Affairs, Social Studies of Science, Economy and Society, Theoretical Criminology, and the British Journal of Criminology.

Research areas

Critical Criminology; Sociology of Law; Economic Sociology; Science and Technology Studies

Current Research Activities

My current research includes a study of social impact bonds and the funding of social programs in Canada, the U.S., and the UK. The study has been supported by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

Graduate Supervision

I am currently accepting graduate students for supervision who are pursuing research in areas of: critical criminology; sociology of law; economic sociology; and science and technology studies.

Graduate Students Supervised

Stefan Treffers (PhD Sociology) “Life, Liberty, and Security in an Austere City: Revitalization and Security Politics in Post-Bankruptcy Detroit.” In Progress.

Sana Affara (PhD, Socio-Legal Studies) “Family Mediation as an Alternative to the Family Justice System? Issues, Problems, and Critiques of Mediation” In Progress.

Nick Cristiano (PhD, Sociology) “Managing Risk Environments: An Ethnographic Study of Club Drug Use and Harm Reduction in the EDM Scene.” Completed September, 2020.

Tia Dafnos (PhD, Sociology) “Negotiating Colonial Encounters: (Un)mapping the Contemporary Policing of Indigenous Protests in Canada.” Completed September, 2014.

Jefferd Bryan (MA, Socio-Legal Studies) “Bitcoin’s Semi-Autonomous Social Field: Examining the Impact of Conflict Between Internal Rules and the Law on Bitcoin’s Social Utility.” August, 2020.

Jocelyn MacDonald (MA, Sociology) “Examining the Cost of Kindness: Causes of Food Insecurity in Canada.” February, 2017.

Shan Abraham (MA, Socio-Legal Studies) “The New York Bit License: Bitcoin Regulation in the Context of Attempts to Regulate Hawala.” August, 2015.

Jason Joseph (MA, Socio-Legal Studies) “Neoliberalism and Workers’ Rights: A Case for the Rejuvenation of Labour and Law.” August, 2014.

Shawn Baldeo (MA, Socio-Legal Studies) “Exploring Barriers to Policing White-Collar Crime.” August, 2013.

Courses Taught

Advanced Research Strategies in Socio-Legal Methods, SLST 6005 3.0

Politics of Security and Regulation, SLST 6030 3.0

Books

Williams, James W. (2012) Policing the Markets: Inside the Black Box of Securities Enforcement. New York: Routledge.

Select Refereed Journal Article

Williams, James W. (2020) “Surveying the SIB Economy: Social Impact Bonds, ‘Local’ Challenges, and Shifting Markets in Urban Social Problems” Journal of Urban Affairs. 42(6): 907-919.

Williams, James W. and Nikolai M. Cook (2016) “Econometrics as Evidence?: Examining the ‘Causal’ Connections between Financial Speculation and Commodities Prices” Social Studies of Science. 46(5): 701-724.

Williams, James W. (2015) “Dodging Dodd-Frank: Excessive Speculation, Commodities Markets, and the Burden of Proof” Law and Policy. 37(102): 119-152.

Williams, James W. (2014) “Feeding Finance: A Critical Analysis of the Shifting Relationships between Finance, Food, and Farming” Economy and Society. 43(3): 401-431.

Williams, James W. (2014) “Surveying the Field of Forensic Accounting in Canada” Journal of Forensic and Investigative Accounting. 6(3): 27-47.

Williams, James W. (2013) “Regulatory Technologies, Risky Subjects, and Financial Boundaries: Governing ‘Fraud’ in the Financial Markets” Accounting, Organizations, and Society. 38(6): 544-558.

Lippert, Randy and James W. Williams (2012) “Taking Exception: The Cases of Financial and Urban Governance” Social and Legal Studies. 21(1): 51-72.

Williams, James W. (2009) “Envisioning Financial Disorder: Financial Surveillance and the Securities Industry” Economy and Society. 38(3): 460-491.

Williams, James W. (2008) “The Lessons of ‘Enron’: Media Accounts, Corporate Crimes, and Financial Markets” Theoretical Criminology. 12(4): 471-499.

Williams, James W. (2008) “Out of Place and Out of Line: Positioning the Police in the Regulation of Financial Markets” Law and Policy 30(3): 306-335.

Select Chapters in Books

Williams, James W. (2020) “Recidivists, Rough Sleepers, and the Unemployed as Financial Assets: Social Impact Bonds and the Creation of New Markets in Social Services” in Kean Birch and Fabian Muniesa eds. Assetization: Turnings Things into Assets in Technoscientific Capitalism. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Williams, James W. (2014) “The Private Eyes of Corporate Culture: The Forensic Accounting and Corporate Investigation Industry and the Production of Corporate Financial Security” in Kevin Walby and Randy Lippert eds. Corporate Security in the 21st Century: Theory and Practice in International Perspective. pp. 56-77. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Williams, James W. (2010) “Whither Corporate and White-Collar Crime?: Reflections on the Study of Financial Wrongdoing in the Age of Neo-Liberalism” in Aaron Doyle and Dawn Moore eds. Critical Criminology in Canada: New Voices, New Directions. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Technical Reports

Williams, James W. (2019) From Visions of Promise, to Signs of Struggle: Exploring Social Impact Bonds and the Funding of Social Services in Canada, the US, and the UK. Toronto: York University.


Daphne Winland

Associate Professor

Faculty Profile


stylized photo of Lesley WoodLesley Wood

Associate Professor and Chair

BA (Hon) Sociology, Queen's University (1991),
MSc (Econ) Sociology, London School of Economics and Political Science (1994),
Ph.D. Sociology, Columbia University (2005)

Faculty Profile

Biography

As a kid, I read, I watched, and I wondered. I was allowed the freedom to explore, and took full advantage, wandering through Toronto, and joining groups. As a teenager, I became active in the struggles against apartheid in South Africa, against nuclear war, and fought against reintroducing the death penalty. Perhaps due to their backgrounds in Irish and Jewish communities, my parents encouraged my sense that history, politics and culture mattered. Sociology, being one of the broadest of fields, became an intellectual home. Its theories of power, perception and social life dovetailed with my anti-authoritarian, embodied, intersectional politics.

My path to the here and now was indirect. I travelled across Europe, the Middle East and Africa for two years. I worked outside the university as a tree planter, a temp secretary, a securities courier, a painter, a community organizer, an elevator operator, a receptionist, and a drag king. I worked at the City of Toronto, helped to start a restaurant, worked in a bike shop, and in many random offices.

In the academy, and outside of it, I have learned so much from so many mentors, students, and fellow travellers. Most of the time, I see my work as a joy, an incredible privilege and a responsibility. I try to ensure that my work is useful for grassroots struggles of marginalized folks. I believe that there are patterns in power and action that can help to make sustainable change, and I know that they are difficult to understand. This means that careful research methods and conceptualisations are important. I know that I, that we, don’t really understand social life that well, and we shouldn’t take ourselves too seriously. While I spend a lot of time in meetings, if given the chance, I’d rather be dancing.

Research areas

I am interested in how ideas travel, how time matters, how power operates, how institutions change, how conversations influence practices, how people resist and how conflict starts, transform and ends.

Current Research Activities

Peoples Global Action oral history project—Peoples Global Action was an international grassroots network that brought together social movements against neoliberalism and for humanity. I’m part of an international team of activists and scholars collecting the stories and lessons from this formation, with the goal of creating a digital archive. pgaoralhistory.net/ | www.nadir.org/nadir/initiativ/agp/ Funded by LA&PS Small Grant, and Antipode Foundation.

Methods of studying social movements—When we attempt to map protest activity, we often rely on the reports of the mainstream media. However, social media is emerging as a source of protest data. This project, alongside my DARE funded undergraduate research assistant Dyllan Goldstein, is comparing event catalogues created from Twitter, data, with those revealed by other newsmedia. Funded by LA&PS DARE Grant.

Policing of protest—Continuing the research for Crisis and Control: The Militarization of Protest Policing,/em>, this project is mapping the changes in protest policing tactics in Canada, the US and through international policing networks.

Time perception and temporality in social movements—Continuing theorization of the role of temporality in social movements. Most recently resulting in co-editing a special issue of Social Movement Studies www.tandfonline.com/toc/csms20/19/5-6

Recent Research Grants

2020 SSHRC Connection Grant, Imagining Abolitionist and Decolonizing Futures. Co-investigator.
2019 SSHRC Connection Grant, Decolonizing Abolition Co-investigator.
2016 Antipode Foundation Scholar-Activist Grant, “People’s Global Action and the Alterglobalisation ‘Movement of Movements’: An Oral History of Transnational Organising for Today’s Struggles” (co-applicant) Laurence Cox (National University of Ireland Maynooth, Ireland), Lesley Wood (York University, Toronto, ON, Canada) and Uri Gordon (Loughborough University, UK).

Graduate Supervision

I currently work with a large number of graduate students, but occasionally consider new students, if the projects seem like ones I can learn from, and to which I can offer useful guidance.

Graduate Students Supervised

Matthew Hayter, 2017. Quest(ion)s of Anarchist Power: Rethinking Power-To, Power-Over, and Power-With in the Radical Democratic Praxis of Consensus Decision-Making. PhD Social and Political Thought.(2008-17).

Craig Fortier. 2016. Unsettling Movements: Decolonizing Non-Indigenous Radical Struggles in Settler Colonial States. PhD Sociology (2011-16) Now Assistant Professor at University of Waterloo.

Gulay Kilicaslan (PhD 2014-). “Deprovincializing Kurdish Politics: Forced Migration, Politics of Scale and Activism across Kurdistan, Turkey and Europe.” (completing PhD in Sociology)

Rana Sukarieh (PhD 2016-) writing dissertation. “Building a Sustained Transborder Political Solidarity: The Case of Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions in Toronto.” (completing PhD in Sociology)

Chanelle Gallant (2017 -2020), RRP “Can Sex Be Work: A Critical Reflection.” (MA Sociology)

Kathryn Wells (2017-19); “Activism in a Post-Disaster Setting: How displacement contributes to participation in Environmental Justice Movements.” (MA SOCI and Disaster Management)

Christine Montgomerie-Mione (2014-2016),”Exploring the Emergence of Social Movements during Times of Economic Crisis” (MA Sociology)

Saad Sayeed (2008-12), Thesis: INVENTING ISLAM: State and Subjectivity in Pakistan (MA Interdisciplinary Studies)

Lindsay Windhager (2013) (MA Social and Political Thought)

Courses Taught

SOCI5995 MA Workshop
SOCI6795 Public Space and Political Culture
SOCI6711 Social Movements
SOCI6090 Selected Topics in Empirical Methods—Historical Comparative Methods

Books

Tilly, C., Castaneda, E., Wood, L.J. 2019 Social Movements 1768–2018 4th edition. Routledge

Wood, L.J. 2014 Crisis and Control: The Militarization of Protest Policing. Pluto Books Limited. (Canadian edition, Between the Lines; US distribution, University of Chicago)
– 2015 [French translation] Mater la Meute. Lux Editeur.
– In process [Turkish translation]

Wood, L. J. 2012/2014 Direct Action, Deliberation, and Diffusion: Collective Action after the WTO Protests in Seattle. Cambridge University Press.

Tilly, C., Wood, L.J. 2013. Social Movements 1768–2012 3rd Edition. Paradigm PublishersTilly, C., Wood, L.J. 2008 Social Movements 1768–2008 2nd Edition. Paradigm Publishers.
– 2009/10 [Spanish edition] Editorial Critica

Select Refereed Journal Articles

2020 (Dis)Assembling Event Identities: Anarchists, Liberals, Socialists and Feminists—Toronto’s G20 Protests. Poetics. With Glenn S. Stalker.

2020 “Policing Counter-protest,” Sociology Compass.

2020 “The Seattle Model,” “Seattle+20: Movements at the Millennium.” Socialism and Democracy 34:1

2019 “Anarchist Gatherings 1986–2017.” ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies. September.

2017 “Eventful Events: Local Outcomes of G20 Summit Protests in Pittsburgh and Toronto,” with Suzanne Staggenborg, Glenn Stalker and Rachel Kutz-Flammenbaum. Social Movement Studies 16(5):1-15

2015 “Policing with Impunity,” Socialist Register 2016

2015 “Idle No More, Diffusion and Facebook,” Social Movement Studies, May 2015

2012 “Reaching Beyond the Net: Political Circuits and Participation in Toronto’s G20 Protests.” With Glenn J. Stalker. Social Movement Studies,

2010 “Horizontalist Youth Camps and the Bolivarian Revolution: A Story of Blocked Diffusion.” Journal of World Systems Research Special Issue. (Volume XVI, Number 1, 2010) pp 48-62.

2008 “The Impacts of State Surveillance on Political Assembly and Association: A Socio-Legal Analysis,” with Luis A. Fernandez, Amory Starr, Randall Amster and Manuel J. Caro. Qualitative Sociology. Special Issue on Political Violence, 31:3 September 2008.

2007 “Breaking the Wave: Repression, Identity and the Seattle TacticsMobilization 12:4. December 2007. 377-388.

2004 “Breaking the Bank and Taking to the Streets” Journal of World-Systems Research, pp. 3-23. Special issue: ‘Global Social Movements Before and After 9/11.

Chapters in Books

(Recent & Selected)
2020 “Social Movements as Essential Services” in Alerta Global. Políticas y movimientos en tiempos de pandemia, with Breno Bringel, Buenos Aires: CLACSO, 2020. ISBN 978-987-722-646-1

2020 “Anarchist Gatherings,” in Remaking Radicalism: A Grassroots Documentary Reader of the United States, 1973–2001 Edited by Emily Hobson and Dan Berger, University of Georgia Press

2020 “Policing and the Police” in We Resist. Cynthia Levine-Rasky and Kowalchuk. McGill-Queen’s Press.

2019 “Alt-right and Antifa: Movement-countermovement dynamics in the Trump Era” in The Future of Social Movements in Canada. Ed. Robert Brym and Anna Slavina. Proceedings from the S.D. Clark Symposium. Rocks Mills Press

2019 “Repression, Solidarity and Transnational Escalation” in Rule and Resistance beyond the Nation State: Contestation, Escalation, Exit. Edited by F. Anderl/ C. Daase/ N. Deitelhoff/ V. Kempf/ J. Pfister/P. Wallmeier. Rowman & Littlefield International. Oct 2019

2019 “The Political Economy of Social Movements” in Change and Continuity: Rethinking the New Canadian Political Economy. Edited by Mark Thomas, Leah F. Vosko, Carlo Fanelli. McGill—Queen’s University Press

2018 “Fighting Back and Building Another World: Contention in the 21st century,” in Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives. Pp. 296-99. Edited by Patricia Albanese and Lorne Tepperman, Emily Alexander. Oxford University Press

2017 “Waves of Protest, the Eros Effect and the Social Relations of Diffusion” in Spontaneous Combustion. Jason DelGandio and AK Thompson, eds. SUNY Press

2017 “Neither Cooptation nor Charity” in Why Don’t the Poor Rise Up?. Edited by Michael Truscello and Ajamu Nanwaya. AK Press.

2016 “Consent and Coercion—The Criminalization of Dissent” with Craig Fortier in A World To Win: Organizing Dissent: Contemporary Social Movements in Theory and Practice., 2nd edition. William Carroll and Kanchan Sarkar, eds. Arbeiter Ring Press

2015 “Uncooperative Movements, Militarized Protest Policing and the Social Movement Society.” In Protest and Politics: The Promise of Social Movement Societies. Edited by Kathleen Rogers and Howard Ramos. UBC Press, May 2015.

2014 York U. LA&PS Faculty Award for Distinction in Research, Emerging Researcher Category

2014 York University “Research Leader” Recognition 2013-14

2013 John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award. Direct Action, Deliberation and Diffusion. Canadian Sociological Association.

2008 John O’Neill Award for Teaching in Sociology, Sociology Undergraduate Students Association, York University

2010– North American Co-Editor: Interface: A Journal For and About Social Movements

2003–2012 Advisory Board: Upping the Anti: A Journal of Theory and Action.

2018– Book Series Editorial Board Member—Engaged Studies in Social Movements, Pluto Press


photo of Cary WuCary Wu

Assistant Professor

Ph.D. 2019, University of British Columbia

Twitter: @carywoo
Faculty Profile
Website

Biography

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at York University. I am also a research associate at the York Centre for Asian Research (2019-), and an associate researcher at the Laboratory for Comparative Social Research in the Higher School of Economics, Russia (2015-). I was a visiting fellow at GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany (2016). Before coming to Canada, I studied in China and the US. I received my PhD in sociology from the University of British Columbia (2019).

My research focusing on political culture and inequality has appeared in more than 20 peer-reviewed journals such as Social Science Research, Social Forces, The Sociological Quarterly, International Political Science Review, International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Social Indicators Research, Urban Studies, Geoforum, Chinese Sociological Review, Journal of Contemporary China, PNAS, and PLOS One.

I also believe strongly in the importance of sharing and disseminating my research findings. I have published opinion articles in The Conversation, Macleans, and Global Dialogue. I have shared my research with the public via national and international radio and newspaper forums including NPR, CBC, Times Higher Education, and Toronto Star.

Research

I am a political sociologist. My research is motivated by two general questions. The first concerns how value orientations such as social and political trust are formed, while the second asks why structural inequality based on gender, race, and ethnicity persists. I approach these questions through both single-context focused investigation of countries that include Canada, China, and the United States, as well as cross-national comparison at the regional and global level. My methodological strategy is primarily quantitative (e.g., survey and big data analysis), although I have also made use of qualitative interviews and ethnographic field work.

I am particularly interested in when and where people learn to trust in others and in their government. I have looked at Quebecers and U.S. Southerners (both have low trust) and whether they become more trusting when they move to high trust places (The Sociological Quarterly 2020; Social Indicators Research 2020). I find that trust has its deep roots in early life socialization but it can also respond to larger institutional contexts (Chinese Sociological Review 2020). I have also considered how victimization and experiences of discrimination affect people’s trust in others (Social Science Research 2020; Frontiers in Sociology 2019) and developed a majority-minority approach to study ethnicity and trust association cross-nationally (Social Forces 2018). I have made contributions to explaining why trust is lower among minority groups (PNAS 2016; Oxford Handbook of Social and Political Trust 2017).

I have made major contributions in the study of global patterns of trust and political support. To explain why people in authoritarian China hold the highest levels of political trust in the world, I consider differences in the within-country trust patterns between China and other Asian societies, identifying political control as an essential cause of Chinese exceptionalism (International Political Science Review 2018; Journal of Contemporary China 2018). To understand why political trust in Western democracies has been declining, especially when it remains stable and high in many authoritarian societies, I developed a response pattern model to study the relationship between democracy, critical citizenship and trust (International Journal of Comparative Sociology 2018).

I am also part of the Three Worlds of Trust–a 1.5 million project funded by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences. The project investigates how welfare state conditions the effect of experience of hardships in early life on trust, happiness, and life satisfaction. As part of this project, we are currently using data from both longitudinal and cross-sectional surveys to investigate the decline of social trust (Social Science Research R&R), and how political contacts affect people’s social and political trust.

I am also interested in why people move from one place to another and how migration shapes their well being. I have studied international students’ migration experiences and how they further shape their future migration plans (Geoforum 2017). Focusing on Chinese society, I have explored whether returning immigrants from urban China are more likely to become self-employed in their rural home (The China Review 2018), and how hukou registration creates durable categorical inequalities in mental illness between immigrants and local populations in urban China (Chinese Journal of Sociology 2018). Currently, I am working on projects that consider how childhood victimization affects people’s migratory decisions later in life in Canada.

I have been re-thinking the subject matter in urban sociology, calling for urban sociology to shift its focus to the sociology of the city (The American Sociologist 2016). I am also part of a team involved in the Scenes Project at the University of Chicago and we have explored how the theory of scenes can be used to address current debates in urban theory (Urban Studies 2018; Springer Handbook of Classical Sociological Theory, forthcoming). I recently received YCAR Canada-China Fund and the LA&PS Dean’s Award for Research Excellence (with my student Joanne Ong) to study urbanization in Toronto (International Sociology, forthcoming).

I also care very much about the persistence of gender inequality. I have explained why women researchers are less likely to comment on men’s published work (PLOS One 2020). I have also shown a gender gap in citation counts, but the gap can only explain very little of the long-standing gender wage gap among professors in Canada (Canadian Review of Sociology, under review).

Most recently, with the support from Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), I have started new research projects investigating how political culture and social norms shape COVID-19 response (Contexts 2020; Chinese Sociological Review 2020) and how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities (Canadian Diversity 2020; Ethnic and Racial Studies R&R).

Selected Research Grants

  • 2020, Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), $176, 256 (PI: Cary Wu
  • 2020, Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), $975, 802 (Co-applicant: Cary Wu
  • 2020, Seed Fund for Research in the Time of COVID 19 at York University, $5,000 (PI: Cary Wu)
  • 2020, LA&PS Dean’s Award Research for Research Excellence (PI: Cary Wu, with undergraduate student Joanne Ong)
  • 2020, McLuhan Centre at University of Toronto, $9,100 (Co-applicant: Cary Wu
  • 2019, YCAR Canada-China Initiatives Fund, $15,154 (PI: Cary Wu)

Graduate Supervision

I am highly committed to training and mentoring students. I have mentored more than 10 students who have gone on to Master’s or doctoral programs at the U of T, UBC, York, NYU, Columbia, UCLA, Oxford, John Hopkins University, LSE, and Hebrew University.Graduate Students Supervised

  • Jana Borras, PhD dissertation committee
  • Lisa Seiler, PhD comprehensive exam committee
  • Joanne Ong, undergraduate directed studies, LA&PS DARE research supervisor

Courses Taught

I teach graduate level Quantitative Analysis (SOCI 6112) and undergraduate level Social Statistics (SOCI 3030).

Selected Papers in Peer-reviewed Journals

Wu, Cary. forthcoming. Social capital and COVID-19: A multidimensional and multilevel approach. Chinese Sociological Review.

Wu, Cary. 2020. How does gun violence affect Americans’ trust in each other?. Social Science Research 91:1-15.

Wu, Cary. 2020. How stable is generalized trust? Internal migration and the stability of trust among Canadians. Social Indicators Research. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-020-02484-8

Wu, Cary, Rima Wilkes, Malcolm Fairbrother, and Giuseppe Giordano. 2020. Social capital, trust, and state coronavirus testing. Contexts.

Wu, Cary, Sylvia Fuller, Zhilei Shi, and Rima Wilkes. 2020. The gender gap in commenting: Women are less likely than men to comment on (men’s) published research. PLOS ONE.

Wu, Cary. 2020. Does migration affect trust? Internal migration and the stability of trust among Americans. The Sociological Quarterly: 1-21.

Wu, Cary, and Zhilei Shi. 2019. Education and social trust in transitional China. Chinese Sociological Review: 1-29.

Wu, Cary, Rima Wilkes, Daniel Silver, and Terry Clark. 2019. Current debates in urban theory from a scale perspective: Introducing a scenes approach. Urban Studies 56.8: 1487-1497.

Wilkes, Rima, and Cary Wu. 2019. Immigration, discrimination, and trust: A simply complex relationship. Front. Sociol. 4: 32. doi: 10.3389/fsoc.

Wilkes, Rima, and Cary Wu. 2018. Ethnicity, democracy, trust: a majority-minority approach. Social Forces 97.1: 465-494.

Wu, Cary, and Rima Wilkes. 2018. Local–national political trust patterns: Why China is an exception. International Political Science Review 39.4: 436-454.

Sher, Chloe, and Cary Wu. 2018. Fracking in China: community impacts and public support of shale gas development. Journal of Contemporary China 27.112: 626-641.

Wu, Cary, and Rima Wilkes. 2018. Finding critical trusters: A response pattern model of political trust. International Journal of Comparative Sociology 59.2: 110-138.

Wu, Cary, et al. 2018. Does Migration Pay Off? Returnees, Family Background, and Self-Employment in Rural China. China Review,/em> 18.1: 59-78.

Fu, Qiang, Cary Wu, et al. 2018. Live like mosquitoes: Hukou, rural–urban disparity, and depression. Chinese Journal of Sociology 4.1: 56-78.

Wu, Cary, and Rima Wilkes. 2017. International students’ post-graduation migration plans and the search for home. Geoforum 80: 123-132.

Wu, Cary. 2016. Moving from Urban Sociology to the Sociology of the City. The American Sociologist 47.1: 102-114.

Wu, Cary, and Rima Wilkes. 2016. Durable power and generalized trust in everyday social exchange. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113.11: E1417-E1417.

Book Chapters

Wu, Cary and Terry Clark. 2020. Urbanization theorizing. In Seth Abrutyn and Omar Lizardo (editors). Handbook of Classical Theory. New York: Springer.

Wilkes, Rima, and Cary Wu. 2018. Trust and minority groups. The Oxford Handbook of Social and Political Trust: 231.

Wu, Cary. 2016. Understanding associations and trust patterns. In Meghan Kallman and Terry Clark. The Third Sector: Community Organizations, NGOs, and Nonprofits. Illinois: University of Illinois Press.

Op-Eds

Wu, Cary. Gun violence has fuelled enduring trust issues for many Americans. The Conversation (September 7, 2020)

Wu, Cary and Terry Clark. Adding culture in Scenes to the demography of urbanization. Perspectives: Newsletter of the ASA theory section (Summer, 2020)

Wu, Cary, Sylvia Fuller, and Rima Wilkes. Women less likely to critique men’s research in academic journals. The Conversation (August 17, 2020)

Wu, Cary. How Chinese citizens view their government’s coronavirus response. The Conversation (June 4, 2020)

Wu, Cary. Do immigrants gain trust in high trust Canada?. Global Dialogue: Magazine of the International Sociological Association (Summer 2018)

Wu, Cary and Rima Wilkes. The stats bear it out: In Quebec, trust is low. Maclean’s (March 30, 2017)

Wu, Cary. One Canada and three immigrant populations: education and trust inequalities. UBC Think Sociology Newsletter (Fall, 2017)

Wu, Cary. When ‘home’ isn’t what you think it is. The Ubyssey (March 23, 2014)

News and Media Interviews

The Jerry Agar Show (September 11, 2020): How trustful you are maybe a product of where you grew up.

NPR (September 2, 2020): Hostility Toward China Is Growing In The U.S., Poll Numbers Show.

Toronto Star (August 31, 2020): Henry. Hinshaw. They’ve been heroes of COVID-19. But back-to-school anxiety is testing the public’s faith.

Toronto Star (June 19, 2020): East Asian Canadians face a ‘disproportionate’ mental health impact of COVID, study says.

VICE (June 18, 2020): NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh Tossed From Parliament For Calling Another Politician Racist.

Public Discourse (May 13, 2020): How social capital helps communities weather the COVID-19 storm.

Institute of Family Studies (May 11, 2020): More marriage, less COVID: How communities with more marriage are weathering the storm.

Fairchild TV (May 13, 2020). TV interview.

CBC (March 31, 2020): Experts study how coronavirus pandemic affects trust in officials, ourselves.

Times Higher Education (March 23, 2020): Coronavirus sparks a rising tide of xenophobia worldwide.

Toronto Star (March 14, 2020): In the time of coronavirus, what are your rights?

Maisonneuve (February 7, 2020): Testing the Waters.

The Source (April 25, 2017): Post-graduation migration: non-binary for international students.

University Herald (February 23, 2017): International Students’ Concept of ‘Home’ Influence Future Career Plans, According To Study.

Roundhouse radio (February 23,2017). Sense of place with Minelle Mahtani.

CBC (February 21, 2017). UBC exchange student study.

Mingbao Canada news (February 17, 2017). International students and their post-graduate migration plans.

Committees

2020–, Expert Advisory Committee, COVID-19 Social Impacts Network, Association for Canadian Studies (ACS)

2020–, Hakka Research Committee, York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)

2020–, Tenure and Promotions Committee, York Sociology

2019-, Research and Awards Committee, York Sociology

Invited Seminars and Oral Presentations

Wu, Cary. Gun violence and trust. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Online, 2020-08.

Wu, Cary. Gender bias in academic commenting. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Online, 2020-08.

Wu, Cary. Urbanization theorizing. Junior Theorists Symposium,, University of California at Berkeley. Online, 2020-08.

Wu, Cary. The migration of trust. American Political Science Association Annual Meeting. Boston, 2018-09.

Wu, Cary. Education lowers trust in transitional China. International Chinese Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Princeton University, 2018-08.

Wu, Cary. Finding critical trusters. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, 2018-08.

Wu, Cary. A theory of home in migration. Society for the Study of Social Problems Annual Meeting, Montréal, 2017-08.

Wu, Cary. Does early life matter for trust? Parental responsibeness and generalized trust in later life. Canada Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Toronto, 2017-05.

Wu, Cary. Political refugees and trust inequalities in Canada. Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies Annual Conference. Victoria, 2017-05.

Wu, Cary. Local-national political trust patterns: Why China is an exception. Carleton University China Studies Workshop. Ottawa, 2017-02.

Wu, Cary. Local-national political trust patterns: Why China is an exception. Hong Kong Baptist University Young Scholars Conference. Hong Kong, 2016-12.

Wu, Cary. Scenes and urban theories. University of Chicago scenes workshop (invited). Chicago, 2016-06.

Wu, Cary. International students’ post-graduation migration and the search for home. Canada Sociological Association Annual Meeting-P2P Migration Workshop. Calgary, 2016-06.

Wu, Cary. Local-national political trust patterns: Why China is an exception. University of California San Diego China Centre (invited). San Diego, 2016-05.

Wu, Cary. Ethnicity, democracy and trust. Three Worlds of Trust Workshop. Stockholm, 2016-01.

Wu, Cary. Relative Political Trust and Why China is an Exception. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Chicago. 2015-08.

Wu, Cary. A response pattern of political trust. 5th LCSR International Workshop. Moscow, 2015-04.

Wu, Cary. In market we trust? Changing power relations in global commodity markets (organizer). Liu Institute of Global Studies. Vancouver, 2014-09.

Wu, Cary. An evolutionary theory of trust. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. San Francisco, 2014-08.

Wu, Cary. Rethinking political trust in China. World Congress of Sociology. Yokohama, 2014-07.

Ad Hoc Reviewer

American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, American Political Science Review, Social Forces, Social Science Research, British Journal of Sociology, European Journal of Political Research, Urban Studies, City & Community, Sociology of Education, Population Research and Policy Review, International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Sociological Forum, Frontiers Psychology, International Political Science Review, Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Chinese Journal of Communication, Social & Cultural Geography, Journal of Contemporary China, and Canadian Review of Sociology.


Emeritus Faculty

photo of Alan BlumAlan Blum

Emeritus Professor

Because of pandemic, contact should be done through email or phone: (647) 763-7722

BA Anthropology and Sociology Roosevelt University,
MA University of Chicago,
PhD Sociology and Social Psychology University of Chicago

Faculty Profile

I am Executive Director of the Culture of Cities Centre in Toronto; Senior Professor in Sociology, Social and Political Thought, and Communication and Culture at York University, Toronto; and Adjunct Professor at St. Jerome’s University at the University of Waterloo. I received my Phd from the University of Chicago, and was US National Institutes of Mental Health Fellow in the department of Psychiatry at Harvard University, and a Visiting Fellow at King's College of Cambridge University, England before becoming Professor of Sociology first at Columbia University and then New York University. I have been a Visiting Professor at universities in the US and the UK including the University of Wales, The Institute of Social Change of the University of California at Berkeley, Virginia Commonwealth University, the New College of the University of South Florida, and have received research fellowships from foundations such as Leverhulme, and the MacArthur among others.

Biography

Over the years I framed and conducted research on the problem of ambiguity, first as vestigial and indeterminate meaning that exceeds determination in ways that remain unspoken in any discourse. I pursued such a problem in a variety of studies and sought to develop qualitative methods for analyzing ambiguity as if a system of adjustments taking shape for speakers in a discourse. I developed the notion of an abeyance from Michael Foley’s research on constitutions (Foley, 1989) to examine the way in which silence towards assumptions and interpretations are ways of holding in abeyance or deferring conflict that would occur if all of the unstated implications were made explicit.

This approach to methods gained force in the collaboration with Peter McHugh in 1974 that led us to begin with studies that explored speech acts in everyday settings (charges of bias, ascribing motives, identifying snubs, official rejections of papers in a physics journal, etc) as behavior which we then translated into representations of collective images of problems that they seemed to assume as if unthought conditions of action. We analyzed the material by viewing each setting as a situation of problem-solving(with McHugh et al 1974) where the (real) problem to be solved seemed always to be how to endure the unfinished remains or ambiguity of such formulative work.

I focus upon situations that destabilize expectations in order to bring into view the grounds for the expectations that are effected. These are not simply occasions of obvious transgression, major crises or large scale conflicts, but can even apply to mundane conduct that creates irresolution over conflicting opinions, judgments, and decisions, say a film review or a discussion of any matter that generates various choices that are contested. Instead of inventorying the various views as in a survey, we try to read them for the argumentative structure as expectations, aspirations, and objectives that seem to bind them as a common horizon.

Orientation
In the sociological canon, Max Weber has presented the rudimentary conception of the symbolic nature of everyday life through his conception of the normative order and of social life as irremediably evaluative. All distinguishing expresses ranking and the struggle for interpretive control over social life as a rank order that makes sociology inevitably into an interpretive art that can at worst examine such beliefs as their attempt to stay in the game, or try to imitate science.

Here is what I start to explore: (1) if social life is an evaluative order as Weber says, then evaluation and its various implications are part of the human actor’s being in the world and as such, a matter for which one must persistently seek clarification; (2) this matter takes shape in distinctions that necessarily exceed whatever they reference and that necessarily limit whatever they sense in ways that can appear definite while remaining irresolute; (3) Such distinctions—what we call concepts, signifiers, and/or more fundamentally words, can only reveal distinguishing in social practices that orient to language from ‘within’ language and as courses of action that are about language, being both in and orienting to being out at the same time; (4)The human actor’s encounter with such distinctions by taking them up or leaving them untouched, is part of what it is to be in the world and to suffer its ambiguity for better or for worse, ambiguity as this mix of insidedness and outsidedness; (5) the suffering of such ambiguity comes to view in cases in which circularity is intensified in ethical collisions over meaning that become loci of contestation for situations of action;(6) these tensions persist as sites of struggle over control of the means of interpretation; (7) this struggle over the question of meaning is registered in Durkheim’s formula of the communicative function of the concept and in the tension between the concept as medium and method of sociation and its function of designating correct conditions for its use; (8) McLuhan’s mantra that the medium is the message means that any content is the site of such struggle and so a locus of collective problem-solving that serves as the dramatic center of the narrative; (9) the drama narrates the struggle to theorize the familiar modes of collectivization disclosed in the routine use of the concept.

In my research I try to recover the relationship between values and social action as the fundamental region of ambiguity, and that as an implicit locus of contestation, is invariably an occasion for exhibiting the working-through of meaning as a situation of problem solving. In this way I do inquiry that identifies fundamental ambiguity as the focus of its problem solving and that formulates discourses that present and contest intended solutions in relation to such problems.

Recent Research Contributions

2016 SSHRC Connections Grant: Intangible Heritage

2014 SSHRC Connections Grant: Affective Cities

2014–2013 CIHR Knowledge Dissemination Grant (with Professor Stuart Murray, Director of the Rhetoric and Ethics Research Laboratory, Carleton University), “Ethical Foundations of Health Care.”

2011–2006 Principal Director, City Life and Well-Being: The Grey Zone of Health and Illness (funded by CIHR), The Culture of Cities Centre, Toronto, Ontario

2005–1999 Principal Director, Culture of the City: Montreal, Toronto, Berlin, Dublin (funded as a Major Collaborative Research Initiatives Award, SSHRC), The Culture of Cities Centre, Toronto, Ontario.

Recent Research Projects

2018– to Present Initiated ongoing field research, participant observation and interviewing in Greece, China and Indonesia on Cultural Identity and Heritage.

Novels

2019 Somebody Nobody Anybody: When the Cows Come Home. Toronto: Quattro Press.

Current Research

My current research is derived from the studies noted in my publications, ostensibly on the Culture of the City project most recently and forthcoming (The Material City...), and on Health and Illness (most recently The Ethics of Care; The Dying Body as a Lived Experience, and a number of essays cited under Publications). Specifically, the projects are directed to the problem of the relations between Heritage and the culture of a community and how what UNESCO names the intangible heritage is more than the arts as they imply but the unspoken relations of a collective to its property system and its ‘unconscious’ heart of darkness. In this respect I am inquiring into the grounds of policy informed initiatives to create Truth and Reconciliation committee reviews and action as these can be discerned in something like a canon that is illustrated in various attempts to reconsider past injustices. Cases include reconstructions of the Holocaust, and current debates over the legitimacy of memorials and such examples, and in addition, the examples of official committees that were created in the past to evaluate domestic conflicts such as the Kerner Report of Chicago that was designed to evaluate the problem of race in the US.

Qualitative Methods/Case Studies: Unspoken Assumptions, Underlying Values, and the Method of Dialectical Interpretation.

My teaching has focused on the development of an interest and aptitude for interpretive research by using the following trajectory as a flexible model. The teaching seeks to inject the spirit of dialectical interpretation into qualitative research by encouraging students to focus on tensions and contradictions in verbal and written materials in order to explore and begin to describe the values that are in play.

As an analytic format I try to model the design of research that first recovers from speeches and texts about matters of fact, implicit arguments over best ways of resolving the matter. The analysis then attempts to translate such debates into conversational data for the inquirer to analyze through particular methods by showing how the ‘debate’ makes reference to a common problem that is unspoken. In contrast to typical qualitative research that focuses on eliciting speech and opinions that can be characterized, tabulated, and converted into themes, such analysis uses its methods to go “beyond” these surfaces of speech in ways specifically attuned to subjective and qualitative registers that are often held in abeyance. Here we begin to identify provocative elements integral and intangible in the most innocuous kinds of speech and actions in order to create research situations where such provocations can be used to stimulate conversation that becomes data for the analysis of beliefs related to many issues.

Context/Background

This model of analysis originated as the method of Revealed Differences,/em> at the Social Psychology Laboratory of the University of Chicago, and was refined through my translation of the practices of improvisational theater that were used in the research of the Jury Project of that university, and then further developed at the Harvard University Medical School through situations involving the training of medical students and psychiatrists, and then through interviewing and field work on the families of schizophrenic patients.

This approach was expanded in studies at Columbia University and its Community Psychiatry Program of Roosevelt Hospital in New York, in the reformulation of Socratic exchanges as ethical collisions at King's College of Cambridge University, and in Canada in interviews with families of visually impaired children for the Canadian National Institute of the Blind. Eventually, I applied it in research for the Ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario on conflicts over Voice appropriation, and in a project on Race and Legal Aid for the Commission on Systematic Racism and the Office of the Attorney.

Studies that illustrate the method in practice include are intended to make students familiar with its use in studies of juror decision-making regarding insanity, of personal ads that search for relationships, of the self- reports of addicts, and in research on the attributions of motives, domestic conflicts, of family discussion about the birth of a visually impaired child, and complaints of residents of Venice Italy about changes to the city and the influx of foreign visitors. Students are then encouraged to examine research studies that they can introduce from their own readings and work that seem relevant examples. Based upon this kind of preparation, students are expected to learn to use and apply such methods and theories in creating their own research and to review and evaluate the research of others. On this basis, eventually students are invited to frame a qualitative case study related to their own current work, research, or history.

Learning Outcomes for students

  1. To mix and match theories as practical methods for qualitative research from influential models in psychoanalysis, rhetoric, ethnomethodology, ordinary language philosophy, phenomenology, hermeneutics, narrative methods, and symbolic interaction.
  2. To distinguish between causal analysis and the analysis of meaning in addressing human conduct.
  3. To identify the argumentative structure and common problem(s) in qualitative material and to rise above argument in analysis.
  4. To convert the data of discrete responses into dialogue form.
  5. To apply methods of interpretation to collective documents such as policies, reports, advertisements, statistics, legal materials, visual representations, commodities and other objects and to the messages conveyed by symbols and images.
  6. To handle tensions of objectivity and subjectivity as an inquirer in qualitative research through a method that seeks to befriend the data as a way of strengthening the subject.

Books

Sole Author

2019 Forthcoming. The Material City: The Weight of Numbers. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s Press
2016 The Lived Experience of the Dying Body. London: Routledge Press.
2011 The Grey Zone of Health and Illness. Bristol: Intellect Press.
2003 The Imaginative Structure of the City. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.
1978 Socrates: The Original and its Images. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul
1974 Theorizing. London: Heinemanns.

Co-Authored

1988 Self-Reflection in the Human Sciences, with Michael Brown, Fred Dallmayr, Maurice Roche, and Kurt Wolff. Edited by Max Van Manen. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press.
1984 Self-Reflection in the Arts and Sciences, with Peter McHugh. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press.
1974 On the Beginning of Social Inquiry, with Peter McHugh, Stanley Raffel, and Daniel Foss. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Co-Edited

2016 The Ethics of Care: Moral Knowledge, Communication and the Art of Care-Giving. Co-edited with Professor Stuart Murray. London: Ashgate Press.

Recent Book Chapters

2019 “Towards Delicacy, Desire and Dream in the Work of Peter McHugh: A Sociology of Jouissance” in Memory of Peter McHugh. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s Press.
2016 “Introduction” In The Ethics of Care: Moral Knowledge, Communication and the Art of Care-Giving, edited by Alan Blum and Stuart Murray. London: Ashgate Press, pp. 1-25.
2016 "End of Life as a Symbolic Order: Age in an Era of Mechanical Reproduction" In The Ethics of Care: Moral Knowledge, Communication and the Art of Care-Giving, edited by Alan Blum and Stuart Murray. London: Ashgate Press, pp.134-149
2016 "The Mental Life of the Metropolis" in Place, Space and Hermeneutics, edited by Bruce Janz. Springer Press, pp. 361-378
2016 "On the Unending Beginning of Social Inquiry" in The Reflexive Initiative: On the Grounds and Prospects of Analytic Theorizing, edited by Stanley Raffel and Barry Sandywell. Routledge Advances in Sociology Series, pp. 263-288.
2011 “Life, Death and the In-Between: The Duck/Rabbit and the Face of the Clown.” In Spectacular Death: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Mortality and (Un)representability, edited by Tristanne Connolly. Bristol: Intellect Press, pp. 21-41.
2010 “The Imaginary of Self-Satisfaction.” In: Circulation and the City: Essays on Mobility: and Urban Culture Circulation w, edited by Will Straw and Alexandra Boutros, 64–93. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Refereed Journal Articles

2015 “The Border between Intimacy and Anonymity in Innocuous Action: The Greeting as a Social Form.” Journal of Classical Sociology. 16(1): 69-83.
2014 “Durkheim's Ruse: The Concept as a Seduction.” The Canadian Journal of Sociology. 39(4): 367- 394.
2014 “Death, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life.” Journal of Classical Sociology. 15(1): 24-38.
2014 “Guide(s) for the Perplexed: Science and Literature as Equipment for Living”. Philosophy and Rhetoric. 48(1): 54-72.
2014 “The Ordeal of Solitude”. History of Human Sciences. 27(1): 118-132.
2014 “Age as a Social Form: The Phenomenology of the Passage”. Journal of Medical Humanities. 35(1): 19-36.
2014 “Motive, Desire, Drive: The Discourse of Force”. Compasso: Journal of Comparative Research in Anthropology and Sociology. 4(2): 5-18.
2012 “The Enigma of the Brain and its Place as Cause, Character, and Pretext in the Imaginary of Dementia.” History of the Human Sciences. 25(4): 108-124.
2010 “Peter McHugh 1929-2010: The Unique Gesture.” Human Studies. 33: 231-252.

Recent Presentations and Invited Talks

2019 Invited Keynote Presentation. “Urban Governance and Culture: Care for the Urban Way of Life.” Global Forum on Urban Governance Innovation at the Institute for Urban Governance of Peking University and University of Sanya, China.
2018 Plenary Address: “The Worm’s Eye View of Life: An Essay on Desperation” Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization. University College, Cork, Ireland, Nov. 2-3.
2018 Plenary Address: “Impasse Analysis: Unspoken Assumptions, Underlying Values, and the Method of Dialectical Interpretation” 5th Annual Meeting of the Analytic Theory Association, Syros, Greece July 16-18.
2018 Plenary Address: “The Transmission of Heritage as a Social Phenomenon”, Intangible Heritage: Scenes of Urban Innovation V, 5th Annual Conference of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC). July 10-13, Athens.
2017 Keynote Address: “Writing, Analyzing: Towards and Analysis of Subjectivity”, 5th Annual Meeting of the Analytic Theory Association. Syros, Greece, July.
2017 Keynote Address: “Death and Life: Theorizing Mortality” in Crossing Over: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Death and Morbidity.” Humanities Program, York University, February.
2016 Plenary Address: “Heritage and Scenes of Innovation.” Heritage in Transition: Scenes of Urban Innovation, 4th Annual Conference of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC). Syros Greece, July.
2016 Plenary Address: “Further on Travesty: The Possibility of a Passionate Writing.” 3rd Annual Meeting of the Analytic Theory Association, Syros Greece, July.
2015 Keynote Address: “The Libidinal City”. Libidinal Circuits: Scenes of Urban Innovation, 3rd Annual Conference of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC) University of Liverpool, School of The Arts, July.
2015 Plenary Address: “Tragedy, Comedy and the Fate of the Symptom”, Interpretive Theory and Social Inquiry, 2nd Annual Meeting of the Analytic Theory Association, Syros Greece.
2014 Plenary Address: “The Provocative Uses of Affect in Imagining the Life of the City.” Affective Cities: Scenes of Urban Innovation II, 2nd Annual Conference of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC). Toronto, August.
2014 Keynote Address: “On the Unending Beginning of Social Inquiry. Presented at the Conference on the 40th Anniversary of the book On the Beginning of Social Inquiry (1974), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, June 9–11.
2014 “Age, Dementia, Death: the Caregiver’s Dilemma, paper presented at the conference on Ethical Foundations of Care, Centre for Social Innovation, May 5.
2013 Keynote Address: “The Art of Innovation and its Bottom Line: Making Do, Making and/as Doing, Making Music Together.” Poeticizing the Urban Apparatus: Scenes of Urban Innovation, 1st Annual Conference of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC). New York, August 13.
2013 “The Jouissance of Ethnomethodology: Imaginary, Desire, Drive.” Presented at the International Institute for Ethnomethodology and Conversational Analysis (IIEMCA) Conference, held at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, August 6.
2013 Symposium on Social Innovation in Health Care: Ethical Foundations of Caregiving. Centre for Social Innovation, Toronto, May.
2012 Plenary Address: “The Soul of the City.” The City and the Senses., Great Works Symposium. Drexel University, Philadelphia, June.
2012 “Urbanities.” Presented at the Round Table discussion at the Comparative Literature session of the Learned Societies of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario, May.
2011 “The Writing on the Wall: Science, Literature, and the Unknown.” Presented at the Pharmakon conference held by the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts in Kitchener, Ontario, September 22–25.
2011 “Keeping Up with Keeping Up.” Opening remarks given at the Keeping Up: Enthusiasm, Anxiety and the Culture of Wellbeing conference held at the Culture of Cities Centre in Toronto, Ontario, June 23–26.