Scholarship Recipients

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Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council - Doctoral

Kathryn Barber
Kathyrn's interest looks broadly at the intersection of migration and development. She is particularly interested in non-traditional immigrant receiving countries. Kathryn is interested to know if the experience of migration positively impacts perceptions of migrants.

Photo of graduate studentCarmen Grillo
Carmen's research interests are in social theory and social psychology. His dissertation research is focused on understanding euthanasia and physician assisted suicide as moral issues, with a particular emphasis on the affective, emotional and unconscious aspects of thinking about death and dying."

 

Photo of graduate studentColin Hastings
Colin's research on the social organization of knowledge related to HIV disclosure lies at the intersection of health studies, criminal-legal studies, and media studies. His critical inquiry on this topic has included analysis of how the criminal-legal response to HIV transmission comes to bear on the work of community-based AIDS organizations, and analyses of the content of news media reports of HIV non-disclosure criminal cases. Colin's dissertation project is an institutional ethnographic study of how people come to know about HIV criminalization that examines how news outlets produce knowledge on the topic.

Photo of graduate studentDanielle Landry (Canada Graduate Scholarship recipient)
Danielle’s research interests are in the fields of mad studies, critical disability studies, and the sociology of health and illness. Her proposed SSHRC-funded doctoral research aims to re-theorize how we understand accessibility for people with psychiatric disabilities in the workplace. This research will involve conducting a case study of social enterprises currently operating in Ontario that are run by psychiatric consumer/survivors. Danielle’s MA research (York, Sociology) used critical discourse analysis to investigate psychiatric survivor-led research in Canada. She holds a BA in Sociology (Ryerson) and a certificate in Accessibility Practices (Ryerson).

Sabrina Paillé (Canada Graduate Scholarship recipient)
Sabrina's research interests include classical and contemporary sociological theory; the sociology of modernity; ethnicity and race relations; multiculturalism; nationalism, as well as social and political philosophy. Her PhD research project will investigate the mobilization of the language of gender equality and sexual freedoms in the rejection of multiculturalism and anti-immigration discourses in Western Europe. Sabrina will address the meaning of the mobilization of gender equality and sexual minority rights, depicted as uniquely national values, with respect to the construction of the symbolic borders of the ‘nation’. Her interest in these issues was triggered by the debate on the proposed Charter of Quebec values in the fall of 2013. It relates to her broader concerns regarding processes of ‘othering’, the contemporary transformations of racism and the multiculturalism backlash.

Dean Ray (Canada Graduate Scholarship recipient)
Located at the juncture of sustainable development and community studies, Dean's research addresses how interethnic conflict and contact effects resource extraction in rural spaces. With a particular focus on rurality, he is  interested in how changing group position, the settlement of land claims by Indigenous groups in inland BC, contributes to intergroup hostility, particularly amongst Canadians of non-European origin--Sikh populations--in the forestry industry. Understanding how group conflict and contact occurs between ethnic populations contributes to pathways of sustainability, implicating social phenomena in problems that are typically seen as environmental or engineering in nature. Equally, he seeks to understand how environmentalism, broadly construed, may contribute to 'bridge building' between different ethnic groups. He hopes that his interest will find salience amongst scholars interested in sustainable development and race but also amongst non-academic populations in the Indigenous, White and Sikh communities.

Stefan Treffers
Stefan's proposed research will be looking at municipal financial governance in cities of decline. He is interested in how cash-strapped municipalities are increasingly turning to risky financial investments located in the municipal bond market to fund city services and infrastructure development, leveraging city pensions in the process, and too commonly coming up short. The bankruptcies of Stockton and Detroit, to name a few, are clear illustrations of how highly speculative financial practices, deeply embedded in market logics, have come to define contemporary strategies to deal with municipal obligations. From a development perspective, Stefan is interested in how city finances acquired through municipal bonds are spent on urban revitalization projects when not reinvested. He would like to draw on works from critical urban theory to assess to what extent these attempts at renewal are inclusive and to what extent they encourage uneven development.

Stefan's other interests include political economy, urban governance, urban marginality, criminalization, and urban regulation.

Canada Graduate Scholarship - Masters

Yasmin Ali
Yasmin's research looks at the ongoing Islamophobia directed at Somali-Canadians. This presents a unique case of race and religion's intersection within discourses of Canadian multiculturalism and alienation from the Canadian state.  Her MA research will investigate this intersection by examining how Somali-Canadian communities understand, negotiate, and transform their positions within Canadian multicultural discourses.

Ontario Graduate Scholarship

Photo of graduate studentRawan Abdelbaki
Rawan holds a BA in Sociology and Political Science from the University of Toronto, and completed her MA studies at York University (Sociology) with a research review paper titled Neoliberalism and Canadian Immigration: Rethinking the Land of (In)Opportunity. Her research interests lie in the areas of transnational migration, citizenship, political economy, racialization, political subjectivities, and diaspora studies. Her work is inspired by a smorgasbord of theoretical traditions, namely marxist, feminist, anti-racist, and postcolonial approaches. Rawan is also a labour activist, and is a graduate student affiliate of York University’s Global Labour Research Centre.

Rhonda George
Rhonda's research interests include, but are not limited to: Sociology of Education, Sociology of Sport, Critical Race Theory, Social Reproduction, Cultural Studies and Caribbean Diasporas. Her current doctoral research explores how Black Canadian female basketball athletes that have pursued U.S. athletic scholarships navigate social, academic and athletic contexts. Her research project is also concerned with how this pursuit of U.S. athletic scholarships impacts athletic and educational outcomes.

Caitlin Janzen
Caitlin's research works at the interface of the social and the psychic to explore the role of women as spectators, witnesses and/or consumers of graphic depictions of violence against other women. Influenced by feminist uses of psychoanalysis, critical theory, critical race theories, and postcolonial studies, her research uses case studies from the Canadian news media to film and television in order to analyze women's aggression towards the feminine, and the social and political structures that support and perpetuate such forms of aggression.

Adam King
Adam's research deals with the changing labour relations in the mining sector. He is doing work in Sudbury, Ontario on the political economy of work precarity (particularly the increasing use of contract work) and its relation to 'flexible' and 'riskier' forms of capital accumulation. Thus far, he has completed interviews with unionized mine workers on the historical memory of the 2009 Vale strike and role of collective remembering in the making and remaking of class consciousness and union culture. His goal is to link these issues of structural and material change to the interesting and contradictory ways that workers reconcile these transformations in their daily practice.

Azar Masoumi
Broadly, Azar works in the field of Critical Citizenship Studies, and has a background and interest in Critical Race Theory and Queer Theory. Her dissertation work explores the intersections of gender, sexuality and citizenship, by looking at processes of requesting asylum for lesbian refugees from Iran. She also has an interest in methodology, especially questions of epistemology in qualitative and interview methods.

Rana Sukarieh
Rana's research interests are in the areas of transnational social movements, social movements and political economy in the Middle East and postcolonialism. Her dissertation focuses on the theory of solidarity among transnational activists, with focus on the Palestinian Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement and the anti-sweatshop movements.

Ishrat Sultana
Ishrat's research examines the identity construction of the Burmese Rohingya refugee youth who were born and/or raised in Bangladeshi camps, and how their sense of belonging is influenced by their refugeeness and lack of citizenship. Her research location is both registered and unregistered refugee camps in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Using an ethnographic qualitative approach, she has conducted individual in-depth interviews and Focused Group Discussions with them in early 2016. She is expecting to complete data analysis by early 2017.

Armand and Denise LaBarge Graduate Scholarship in Multiculturalism

Azar Masoumi
Broadly, Azar works in the field of Critical Citizenship Studies, and has a background and interest in Critical Race Theory and Queer Theory. Her dissertation work explores the intersections of gender, sexuality and citizenship, by looking at processes of requesting asylum for lesbian refugees from Iran. She also has an interest in methodology, especially questions of epistemology in qualitative and interview methods.

Dissertation Prize

David Moffette
Dissertation Title:  Governing Irregular Migration:  Logics and Practices in Spanish Immigration Policy

David's research brings forth and examines various contemporary issues involving the complex interplay between legal practices and policies, as well as the ideological underpinnings of criminal and immigration laws, with issues related to state multiculturalism and racism vis-à-vis the securitization of immigration, borders and bordering practices.

David is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa.

Graduate Program in Sociology Distinguished Dissertation Award

David Moffette
Dissertation Title:  Governing Irregular Migration:  Logics and Practices in Spanish Immigration Policy

David's research brings forth and examines various contemporary issues involving the complex interplay between legal practices and policies, as well as the ideological underpinnings of criminal and immigration laws, with issues related to state multiculturalism and racism vis-à-vis the securitization of immigration, borders and bordering practices.

David is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa.

Nathanson Fellowship

Rana Sukarieh
Rana's research interests are in the areas of transnational social movements, social movements and political economy in the Middle East and postcolonialism. Her dissertation focuses on the theory of solidarity among transnational activists, with focus on the Palestinian Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement and the anti-sweatshop movements.

St. George's Society of Toronto Endowment for Graduate Student Award

Leigha Comer
Leigha's research is focused generally on the social organization of health care for the treatment of chronic diseases in Canada. As someone living with chronic pain, she is especially interested in chronic pain as a disease in its own right. Leigha is interested in the organization of health care for chronic pain, but also the impacts of chronic pain on sufferers' lives and identities. For her PhD, she will focus on multidisciplinary pain clinics and how social determinants of health affect treatment outcomes in chronic pain patients.

Victor Hedges Graduate Scholarship

Photo of graduate studentKritee Ahmed
Kritee’s interests lie in the study of the dailiness of work in Toronto and London, UK public transport organizations, in which the importance of customer service is increasingly emphasized.  To investigate how this organizational discourse influences the understanding of work that serves the public, he uses a broad theoretical approach that integrates governmentality studies, political economy and cultural studies. Kritee also has an evolving interest in race and racialization in the contemporary Canadian policy-making context.