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Welcome...

New Faculty Hire - Joseph DiGrazia

Graduate Program in Sociology
New Faculty Appointment
Professor Joseph DiGrazia

Photo of faculty memberI am a political sociologist who is interested in political beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes and how these topics are related to larger debates about issues like race, immigration, and policy. I received my PhD at Indiana University and have since been a postdoctoral fellow at Dartmouth College. Currently, I have ongoing projects that focus on right-wing social movements in the United States, the emergence and spread of political conspiracy theories, labor rights policy, and the role of social media in political communication and behavior. I use a diverse array of methods, though my work is primarily quantitative and employs techniques and data from the emerging area of computational social science. My work in computational social science involves developing novel data sources from the digital traces left by the public’s use of the Internet and communications technology.

Congratulations...

CSA Awards - Leigha Comer

Canadian Sociological Association
Outstanding MA Program Student
2016/2017
Recipient:  Leigha Comer

Photo of StudentFor my Master's thesis, I conducted a content analysis of the chronic pain content at three undergraduate medical schools in Ontario. Overall, I found that the medical schools differ significantly not only in the amount of pain content structured into each curriculum, but also how key topics such as pain mechanisms, pain management, and opioid prescribing practices are taught. I also found that each curriculum describes pain patients as "difficult" and "overwhelming." Content on pain management tends to link chronic pain with addiction, and pain patients are frequently framed as unrewarding to work with, demanding, and non-compliant. My hope is that my work will contribute to the growing literature on promising practices for pain management, and particularly the need to promote both technical skills and positive pain beliefs among medical students.

Welcome Baby

Congratulations go out to Amanda Salerno, who on March 18, 2017, gave birth to baby girl named Gabriella Elena Emma.  Gabriella weighed in at 7 pounds, 11 ounces.  The new family is doing well.

Graduate Program in Sociology Distinguished Dissertation Award/CSA Award

Graduate Program in Sociology Distinguished Dissertation Award, 2016 and Recipient of the Canadian Sociological Association Outstanding PhD Program Student
Recipient:  Markus Kip, PhD

 

Photo of graduate studentThe Ends of Union Solidarity: Undocumented Labour and German Trade Unions

This dissertation focuses on the contested practices of union solidarity with undocumented migrant workers in Germany. Unionists part ways when it comes to the practical meaning of solidarity with workers who lack work permits. To some union members, undocumented migrant workers ought to be included in the bonds of union solidarity by virtue of being workers. To others, undocumented migrant workers are primarily illegal and unfair competitors undermining existing practices and institutions of solidarity. Since 2008, six union centres for undocumented migrant workers called MigrAr (German “Migration & Arbeit”, English “migration & labour”) have been established by labour activists. Their institutionalization under the umbrella of German unions continues to arouse controversies among their members.

This research builds on an activist ethnography following the Extended Case Method. The researcher is positioned as an activist in the MigrAr centre in Berlin. In a critical encounter with Jürgen Habermas's work, the research charts the significance of instrumental and normative rationalities in union controversies around undocumented labour, since it became a topic two decades ago. The fieldwork shows that activists’ engagement for expanding union solidarity cannot be properly understood in relation to Habermas’s account of instrumental and normative rationality alone.

The dissertation, moreover, contests Habermas's dismissal of material reproduction, especially in relation to work and citizenship, as significant for the development of solidarity. Contrary to Habermas's premise of symmetrical reciprocity in his notion of solidarity, this research demonstrates that activists understand their own practice as being premised on conditions of asymmetry. Differences pertain among activists, as to whether this requires holding on to established labour standards and union procedures, or whether specific measures are required to practice union solidarity under the condition of undocumented workers’ legal, economic, and social vulnerabilities. Affirming the latter approach, activists in the Berlin centre encounter multiple obstacles to implement it in union organizations as the ethnography details. Drawing on participant observations and interviews, I argue that the activist practice of solidarity is motivated by what I call political imagination; the ability to imagine activist practices as a contribution towards realizing an alternative form of union solidarity.

To the award committee: Thank you! I feel humbled by this notice. This dissertation has been made possible by the outstanding support from my supervisor, Ratiba Hadj-Moussa, as well as by supervisory committee members Mark P. Thomas and Roger Keil. Many members of the graduate programme have contributed to the production of this piece of work. Here I would like to express my deep gratitude to AK Thompson, Alan Bourke, Audrey Tokiwa, Jesse Carlson, Sheryl Peters and Tia Dafnos, particularly for their feedback and help during the final phase.

Since April 2016, I work as a postdoc at the Graduate School of Urban Studies, Faculty of Architecture at Technische Universität Darmstadt in Germany. Looking at newly built housing for refugees in Germany as well as contemporary approaches to postwar modernist architecture in an international setting, I am using architecture as a lens to understand hegemonic and contested notions of social solidarity.

Program Events

October 2017 Convocation

Convocation
June 21, 2017
Aviva Centre

The Graduate Program in Sociology is extremely proud of its most recent graduates.  We wish you all well!

 

YSGA Social

YSGA Social
Saturday, February 11, 2017
6:30
Trinity Common
303 August Avenue (Kensington Market)

All members of the Graduate Program are invited to the YSGA's 3rd social event of the year.  Come on out and celebrate the winter term with great food and drink! (.pdf)

Lunar New Year/Spring Festival

Lunar New Year/Spring Festival
Saturday, February 11, 2017
11:30
Mother's Dumplings
420 Spadina Avenu

Come on out and celebrate the Lunar New Year/Spring Festival.

Inauguration Get Together

Inauguration Get Together
Thursday, January 19, 2017
5:30
Underground Restaurant

All members of the graduate program in sociology are invited to come to this... interesting and unusual moment.

YSGA Social

YSGA  Social:  Pub Night!
Friday, December 2, 2016
8:00 p.m.
Elephant & Castle
378 Yonge Street (Yonge and Gerrard)

All members of the program are invited to the second YSGA social (pdf).  Let's get together for dinner and drinks at the Elephant and Castle and celebrate the end of the term!

Please RSVP to ysga@yorku.ca.

October 2016 Convocation

Convocation
October 20, 2016
Aviva Centre

The Graduate Program in Sociology congratulates our October 2016 graduates.  We wish you all the best!

Annual Bake Sale for the Workers' Action Centre

Annual Bake Sale for the Workers' Action Centre
Tuesday, October 26 and Wednesday, October 27
11:00-3:00
Sociology Graduate Lounge, 2071 Vari Hall

Azar Masoumi and Danielle Landry will be holding a bake sale to raise funds for the amazing Workers' Action Centre.  If you are on campus, please do drop by, enjoy some sweets and support a very good cause!

If you can't make it to the bake sale, you can still support the initiative by donating online to their team Bowl'nforce.  Even the smallest of donations is appreciated.

YSGA Social

YSGA Social
October 15, 2016
7:30-9:30
Bar + Karaoke
360 Yonge Street, #2

The York Sociology Graduate Association (YSGA) will be hosting its first social event of the year.  All graduate students and faculty in the Graduate Program in Sociology are invited to attend.

Welcome Back Reception

Welcome Back Reception
September 14, 2016
2169 Vari Hall

On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 the Graduate Program hosted a "Welcome Back Reception" where the incoming cohort were introduced to faculty and students in the program.

June 2016 Convocation

Convocation
June  22, 2016
Aviva Centre

The Graduate Program in Sociology congratulates our June 2016 graduates.  We wish you all the best!

Our Faculty and Student Research Events

Conference Report: Marx's Capital After 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism

Marx's Capital After 150 Years:  Critique and Alternative to Capitalism
May 24-26, 2017
Organized by Marx Collegium (York University)
Directorship:  Professor Marcello Musto

An international conference to mark the 150th anniversary of the first publication of Marx’s Capital was held May 24 to 26 at York University.

Organized by Marx Collegium (York University), under the directorship of Marcello Musto, associate professor of sociology, the conference brought together some of the leading scholars in the fields of sociology, political science, and philosophy from more than 20 universities and 10 countries to critically discuss the history, the content, and the relevance of this path-breaking book.

As one of the largest academic events in York University’s Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (LAPS) in many years, the three-day event attracted a large audience, with more than 1,000 students, scholars, and activists coming from as far as Nepal, Japan, Mexico and Nicaragua. The closing session, with a keynote speech by Professor Immanuel Wallerstein (Yale University), was attended by more than 300 people.

For more on this story, please see yfile:  http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2017/06/07/york-hosts-international-conference-marxs-capital-after-150-years-critique-and-alternative-to-capitalism/#.WTjM6xL-pjw.twitter

Call for Proposals - Global Labour Research Centre

Call for Proposals
International Graduate Student Symposium
October 26-27, 2017
York University
Deadline for Submissions:  July 21, 2017

The Global Labour Research Centre at York University invites proposals for presentations at its upcoming third annual international graduate student symposium, which will take place on October 26-27, 2017.  To encourage the formation of the broadest intellectual community, they invite proposals on a wide range of issues and areas of research, including, but no limited to: work, employment, and labour rights; migration, citizenship, and work; inequality, work, and labour markets; gender relations at work and in labour movements; revitalization of workers' movements; work and popular culture; labour, colonialism, and decolonization; work, labour movements, and the environment.  Please see their call for proposals for more information. (.pdf)

Symposium Organizing Committee:  Rawan Abdelbaki, Matthew Corbeil, Lacey Croft, Jolin Joseph, Adam King, Professor Mark Thomas

Roundtable: Performing Perversion with Professor Sheila Cavanagh

Roundtable with Professor Sheila Cavanagh
Performing Perversion
Wednesday, June 7, 2017
10:00-11:30
519 Kaneff

Professor Sheila Cavanagh participates in this roundtable through the Summer Institute of Sexuality Studies. (.pdf)

Book Launch - Pat Armstrong

Book Launch
Wash, Wear and Care:  Clothing and Laundry in Long-Term Residential Care
Professor Pat Armstrong and Dr. Suzanne Day
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
4:30
Pantages Hotel, Drama Room 7
200 Victoria Street
Toronto, Ontario

Clothes are inextricably tied to dignity and personal identity. They take on a particular significance in places such as long-term residential care, where they are among the only personal indicators of identity residents may retain.

In Wash, Wear and Care: Clothing and Laundry in Long-Term Residential Care, Sociology Professor Pat Armstrong and Suzanne Day, a graduate of York’s Sociology Doctoral Program, use the particular case of clothes in nursing homes to raise larger questions about care, women’s labour, privatization and dignity for both those who need and those who provide care.

The book is based primarily on ethnographic research from a seven-year SSHRC-funded project Re-imagining Long-term Residential Care: An internationals Study of Promising Practices and a smaller CIHR funded one on Healthy Aging in Residential Places. Examined through the critical lens of feminist political economy, the neglected issues related to clothes and the labour involved in their care are used to explore the myriad shifting political and economic dynamics experienced by staff, residents, families, volunteers and managers of long-term care homes, the impacts on the health-care system and the implications of health care reform.

Growing out of her research on women’s work and on health care, Armstrong has for more than a decade been researching issues relating to the lives of seniors and the work involved in their care. As of June 2016, she is a co-investigator on a four-year project, “Seniors Adding Life to Years” that received $2 million to study quality of life of seniors living in residential long-term care settings, their caregivers and supporters.

The book will be launched at a public event on May 30 at 4:30pm in Drama Room 7 of the Pantages Hotel, 200 Victoria St., Toronto. Intended to coincide with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, the panel on privatization presented by members of the research team will be followed by a reception.

Research Matters' Parliament Hill Pop-Up

On May 17, York University participated in the Council of Ontario Universities (COU)'s Research Matters annual Pop-Up Research Park on Parliament Hill.  Vice-President, Research and Innovation Robert Hache and sociology's Professor Fuyuki Kurasawa attended with Kurasawa's display, on how digital culture is tackling the world's problems, attracting considerable attention from members of Parliament.  Research Matters chose Kurasawa's work to represent York due to is engaging and timely relevance.  For the full story, please see http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2017/05/23/york-u-showcases-research-at-research-matters-parliament-hill-pop-up/.

International Conference - The Marx Collegium

Marx's Capital After 150 Years:  Critique and Alternatives to Capitalism
Professor Marcello Musto, Conference Organizer
May 24, 2017 - May 26, 2017
York University
Toronto, Ontario
http://www.marxcollegium.org/

After the eruption of the international financial crisis in 2008, Marx's Capital received renewed academic and popular attention. Leading newspapers throughout the world discussed again the contemporary relevance of its pages. Faced with a deep new crisis of capitalism, many are now looking to an author who in the past was often wrongly associated with the "actually existing socialism", and who was hastily dismissed after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

For many scholars, today Marx's analyses are arguably resonating even more strongly than they did in Marx's own time. This international conference brings together several world-renowned sociologists, political theorists, economists, and philosophers, from diverse fields and 13 countries. Its aim is to explore diverse scholarly perspectives and critical insights into the principal contradictions of contemporary capitalism and, in so doing, to draw attention to alternative economic and social models.
The presenters will critically reconsider Marx's Capital as a work that continues to provide an effective framework to understand the nature of capitalism and the transformations of our times.

ADMISSION TO THIS CONFERENCE IS FREE - NO REGISTRATION (.pdf)

The Global Digital Citizenship Lab Speaker Series - April 4, 2017

Hate Trolls and Freedom of Expression Online:  What To Do?
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
12:00 - 1:30
103 Rogers Communication Centre
Ryerson University
80 Gould Street

The surge in both online abuse, most commonly gendered, racially-, sexually-, or religiously-based and in technologically-enabled harassment demands we reconsider the thorny question of how democratic societies deal with abusive discourse while preserving the right to free expression.

Panelists will include among others, Penni Stewart, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, York University, and Fuyuki Kurasawa, Research Chair in Global Digital Citizenship, York University. (.pdf)

Book Launch - Philip Walsh

Book Launch
The Anthem Companion to Hannah Arendt
with co-editor Philip Walsh
Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
3:00-5:00
Founders College Senior Common Room
305 Founders College

Join Professor Walsh and a panel discussion with graduate students who will discuss the influence of Hannah Arendt on their research. (.pdf)

YSGA 7th Annual Graduate Symposium

York Sociology Graduate Association
7th Annual Graduate Symposium
"What is Your Sociological Program?"
Friday, March 10, 2017
9:00 - 5:00
Sociology Common Room
2101 Vari Hall

All students and faculty in the Graduate Program in Sociology, as well as invited guests, are welcome to attend the 7th Annual YSGA Symposium.  Come on out and hear about the research that's being done by your peers.  A complete list of talks will be distributed soon. (.pdf)

Immediately following the Symposium, everyone is invited to attend the social in the Underground restaurant on campus.  Plan to be there for around 6:00 p.m.! (.pdf)

Book Launch - Deborah Davidson

Book Launch
The Tattoo Project
edited by Professor Deborah Davidson
Thursday, March 2, 2017
1:00 - 4:00
McLaughlin Senior Common Room
140 McLaughlin College

Please see the schedule of events running 1:00-4:00. (.pdf)  Please note that Professor Davidson will be available 1:00-4:00 to discuss and sign her book, and to discuss a plan for a York Commemorates Tattoo Exhibit.

The Global Digital Citizenship Lab Speaker Series - Jennifer R. Whitson

Jennifer R. Whitson
University of Waterloo
CITIZEN, SUBJECT, AVATAR: Gamifying Social Problems with Surveillance
Wednesday, February 15, 2017
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Qualitative Research and Resource Centre
N141 Ross Building

The presentation provides an introduction to gamification and the quantified self. By first defining gamification, games, and play, and then linking the effectiveness of gamification to the quantification of everyday life, the paper shows how quantification in gamification is different from quantification in both analog spaces and digital non-game spaces. The presentation draws from governmentality studies to illustrate how quantification is leveraged in terms of surveillance, using three examples to demonstrate the social effects and impacts of gamified behaviour. These examples range from gamifying everyday life using self-surveillance, to the participatory surveillance evoked by social networking services, to the hierarchical surveillance of the gamified call-centre. Importantly, the call-centre example becomes a limit case, emphasizing the inability to gamify all spaces, especially those framed by work and not play. Ultimately, without knowing first what games and play are, we cannot accurately respond to and critique the playful surveillant technologies that gamification leverage, and the very real, very insidious, governance structures that are embedded within. (.pdf)

Jennifer R. Whitson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology & Legal Studies at the University of Waterloo. She works at the nexus of digital games and surveillance studies, having conducted ethnographic fieldwork with game developers since 2012. Her research centres on the shifting production models of the global game industry, tracing how risk management practices, datamining, and digital distribution shape developers' creative work and the larger cultural role of games and play. More generally, she studies digital media surveillance, social influences on software development processes, gamification, and governance in online domains. She is on the board of the University of Waterloo’s Games Institute and their Cybersecurity and Privacy Centre, and is a Research Advisor for Execution Labs, an investment platform for game studios. She is an associate editor of Surveillance and Society, and her work can be found in a number of edited collections, such as The Gameful World (MIT Press), as well as journals such as First Monday, Economy & Society, and FibreCulture.

Discussant: Alex Cybulski (iSchool, University of Toronto)
Sponsored by the York Research Chair in Global Digital Citizenship (Fuyuki Kurasawa)

Social Theory Reading Group-January 11, 2017

Social Theory Reading Group
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
6:00 p.m.
Sociology Common Room
2101 Vari Hall

Graduate students from all disciplines are invited to attend the Social Theory Reading Group on Wednesday, January 11. The reading for this week is Anna Tsing's "Friction:  An Ethnography of Global Connection".  Anyone who wishes to attend is invited to read as much as they'd like of chapters 1, 2 and 4, or if you'd like, you can read the whole book. (.pdf)

YSGA 7th Annual Symposium - Call for Abstracts

The York Sociology Graduate Association is pleased to invite all graduate students in our program to submit an abstract for its 7th Annual Sociology Graduate Symposium on March 10, 2017 (.pdf).

The Global Digital Citizenship Lab Speaker Series - Linsey McGoey

LINSEY MCGOEY (University of Essex)
THE ELUSIVE RENTIER RICH: Piketty’s Data Battles and the Power of Absent Evidence
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2016
2:00pm–3:30pm
Qualitative Research & Resource Centre (N141 Ross)

The popularity of Thomas Piketty’s research on wealth disparities raises a question: why was wealth inequality neglected in mainstream neoclassical economic theory during the latter half of the twentieth century? To explore this question, I draw on the writing of the early neoclassical economist John Bates Clark, who introduced the notion of the marginal productivity of income distribution at the end of the nineteenth century. I then turn to Piketty’s Capital in order to analyze the salience of marginal productivity theories of income today. I suggest that most of the criticism and praise for Piketty’s research is focused on data that is accessible and measurable, obscuring attention to questions over whether current methods for measuring economic capital are defensible or not. Debates over the robustness of Piketty’s data have had unanticipated effects, such as the implication that mainstream economics is marked by a high degree of internal tension and fruitful disciplinary discord. In reality, mainstream theory resists challenges to core disciplinary beliefs, such as the belief that remuneration levels reflect one’s economic contribution. I explore how ‘absent’ data in economics as a whole helps to reinforce blind-spots within mainstream economic theory.

Linsey McGoey is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Essex. She’s currently working on two main research projects. The first explores the relationship between global philanthropy and growing economic inequality, with a focus on new, hybrid forms of philanthropy that direct charitable resources to for-profit recipients. The second is a project on abundance and scarcity in economic and social thought, with an emphasis on work by Georges Bataille and Henry George. McGoey is co-editor (with Matthias Gross) of the International Routledge Handbook of Ignorance Studies (2015), and the author of No Such Thing as a Free Gift: The Gates Foundation and the Price of Philanthropy (Verso, 2015). (.pdf)

Discussant: Kean Birch (Department of Social Science, York University)

Refreshments will be provided at the event.

Sponsored by the York Research Chair in Global Digital Citizenship (Fuyuki Kurasawa)

Social Theory Reading Group - November 30, 2016

Social Theory Reading Group
Wednesday, November 30, 2016
6:00 p.m.
Sociology Common Room
2101 Vari Hall

Picture of Social Theory Reading Group AdvertisementGraduate students from all disciplines are invited to attend the Social Theory Reading Group  on Wednesday, November 30. The reading for this week is Feminism Without Borders by Chandra Talpade Mohanty.  If you're unable to read the whole book, feel free to read the "Introduction" and the last two chapters: "Underwesternized" and "Reorienting Feminism".

 

The Global Digital Citizenship Lab Speaker Series - Dorit Geva

"No to the Ideology of Gender!": French Mobilization Against Same-Sex Marriage and Bourgeois Politics of Distinction
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m
Department of Sociology Common Room
2101 Vari Hall

The “Manif Pour Tous” (MPT) is a French social movement that mobilized during the spring of 2013 against legalization of same-sex marriage. Drawing from ethnographic observation of MPT events, supplemented by interviews with founding members, the paper analyzes
the complex moral claims of MPT activists. It seeks to understand why they mobilized against “gender,” at the same time that they claimed that they were not homophobic, and even self-identified as feminist. The paper argues that MPT members viewed their own ideational complexity as standing against the “ideology of gender” propagated by “bobos,” or bourgeois-bohemian secular elites who putatively dominate French universities and the French state. The politics of gender and sexuality have therefore become a stage upon which intrabourgeois class struggles are being played out in contemporary France.

Dorit Geva is Associate Professor of Sociology at the Central European University (Budapest), and is currently a EURIAS fellow at the Collegium de Lyon. After completing her Ph.D. in Sociology at New York University, she was the Vincent Wright Fellow in Comparative Politics at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute, and spent four years as a Harper Schmidt Fellow teaching social theory at the University of Chicago before joining the Central European University in 2011. She has published a comparative book on the gender politics of military service in France and the United States (Cambridge University Press, 2013) as well as articles in the American Journal of Sociology, Polity, Politics and Society, and Social Politics. With the support of a European
Commission Marie Curie Grant, she has been gathering data on the gender politics of right-wing movements and parties in France. She remains a Torontonian at heart. (.pdf)

Sponsored by the Jean Monnet Chair at York University (Heather MacRae) and the York Research Chair in Global Digital Citizenship (Fuyuki Kurasawa)

Book Launch - Centre For Refugee Studies

Centre for Refugee Studies Seminar Series
Wednesday, November 9, 2016
2:30-4:00 p.m.
Common Area, 8th Floor Kaneff Tower

After the Flight:  The Dynamics of Refugee Settlement and Integration
Co-edited by Professors Morgan Poteet, Department of Sociology, Mount Allison University and graduate of the Graduate Program in Sociology at York University, and Shiva Nourpanah, Department of Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University (with contributions from Michaela Hynie and Susan McGrath, York University).

Social Theory Reading Group - November 9, 2016

Social Theory Reading Group
Wednesday, November 9, 2016
6:00 p.m.
Sociology Common Room
2101 Vari Hall

Graduate students from all disciplines are invited to attend the Social Theory Reading Group  on Wednesday, November 9. The reading for this week is Liquid Modernity by Zygmunt Bauman.

Visions(s) of Politics: The Thought of Sheldon Wolin

Visions(s) of Politics:  The Thought of Sheldon Wolin
November 3-4, 2016
Verney Room
6th Floor South Ross

This conference is free and open to the York community and to the public, but because space is limited please inform the conference organizers that you're coming:  wolinconference2016@gmail.com.

Professor Philip Walsh will be Chairing a session on November 3, 10:30-11:15 called "Dana Villa - Between Arendt and Gadamer:  Re-Reading Politics and Vision".

Reception Contexts

Reception Contexts
October 12, 2016
9:15 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Harry Crowe Room, 109 Atkinson College

Dr. Christopher Kyriakides, York's Canada Research Chair in Socially Engaged Research in Race and Racialization, Department of Sociology, invites you to attend a Panel entitled Reception Contexts, a one-day synergy event hosted in partnership with York's Centre for Refugee Studies.  Reception Contexts will connect graduate students, emerging and established scholars working in the broad areas of ethnic exclusion, racialization and immigration in Europe, North America and the Middle East so as to explore and consider how their work can help to shed light on exclusionary practices related to the reception of 'Syrian refugees' in various national contexts. For more information on this event, including information on the panels, please see here (.pdf).

Social Theory Reading Group - October 5, 2016

Social Theory Reading Group
Wednesday, October 5, 2016
6:10 p.m.
Cucinetta Italian Cafe (York Lanes)

Graduate students from all disciplines are invited to attend the Social Theory Reading Group (.pdf) on Wednesday, October 5 at 6:10 in the Cucinetta Italian Cafe (York Lanes).  This is the first meeting of the Reading Group organized by students in the Graduate Program in Sociology.

Book Launch for Kathy Bischoping and Amber Gazso

Book Launch
Analyzing Talk in the Social Sciences. Narrative, Conversation and Discourse Strategies
Professors Kathy Bischoping and Amber Gazso
April 26, 2016

 

YSGA Presentation Workshop

On Thursday, April 21, 2016, the York Sociology Graduate Association hosted a one-day YSGA Presentation Workshop (.pdf) which provided an opportunity for the students to workshop a presentation and get feedback from their peers and faculty.

ysga-workshop-presentation-photo

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